Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
October, 2014 (3)
September, 2014 (5)
August, 2014 (4)
July, 2014 (4)
June, 2014 (5)
May, 2014 (4)
April, 2014 (4)
March, 2014 (5)
February, 2014 (4)
January, 2014 (4)
December, 2013 (5)
November, 2013 (4)
October, 2013 (4)
September, 2013 (5)
August, 2013 (4)
July, 2013 (4)
June, 2013 (5)
May, 2013 (4)
April, 2013 (5)
March, 2013 (4)
February, 2013 (4)
January, 2013 (4)
December, 2012 (5)
November, 2012 (4)
October, 2012 (5)
September, 2012 (4)
August, 2012 (5)
July, 2012 (5)
June, 2012 (4)
May, 2012 (4)
April, 2012 (5)
March, 2012 (4)
February, 2012 (4)
January, 2012 (5)
December, 2011 (5)
November, 2011 (4)
October, 2011 (5)
September, 2011 (4)
August, 2011 (5)
July, 2011 (5)
June, 2011 (6)
May, 2011 (7)
April, 2011 (4)
March, 2011 (5)
February, 2011 (3)
January, 2011 (5)
December, 2010 (4)
November, 2010 (5)
October, 2010 (4)
September, 2010 (4)
August, 2010 (5)
July, 2010 (4)
June, 2010 (5)
May, 2010 (4)
April, 2010 (4)
March, 2010 (5)
February, 2010 (4)
January, 2010 (4)
December, 2009 (3)
November, 2009 (5)
October, 2009 (4)
September, 2009 (4)
August, 2009 (5)
July, 2009 (4)
June, 2009 (5)
May, 2009 (4)
April, 2009 (5)
March, 2009 (6)
February, 2009 (5)
January, 2009 (5)
December, 2008 (4)
November, 2008 (4)
October, 2008 (6)
September, 2008 (5)
August, 2008 (5)
July, 2008 (4)
June, 2008 (6)
May, 2008 (5)
April, 2008 (5)
March, 2008 (4)
February, 2008 (4)
January, 2008 (5)
December, 2007 (4)
November, 2007 (4)
October, 2007 (6)
September, 2007 (4)
August, 2007 (4)
July, 2007 (5)
June, 2007 (4)
May, 2007 (3)
April, 2007 (2)
March, 2007 (1)

Search

Archives

<October 2014>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2829301234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930311
2345678

by Maureen A. Taylor

More Links










# Sunday, August 24, 2014
An Identification True or False
Posted by Maureen

Since I'm packing for the FGS conference in San Antonio, I thought I'd select a image from Texas for this week's old photo mystery.

Suzanne Wood owns two mystery photos. An elderly uncle identified this pictures as Elenor South (1839-1924), but Suzanne isn't sure if she trusts his memory. Could he have gotten it wrong and it's really Elenor's mother depicted? Elenor's mother was Maradyann Bascom South (1810-1859).



This tintype has had a hard life. There are rust spots and abrasions on the surface. You also can see the outline of an oval: A mat once covered this image. It suggests that this particular photo was once in a case. 

The fullness of the skirt suggests that this woman is wearing a lot of petticoats. It's an early 1860s portrait.

The big question is how old is the woman in this picture? In 1862, Elenor would be 23, and her mother, 52. When her mother was in her 20s, photography wasn't available.

Further evidence for the identification is a second photograph of Elenor and her first husband. 



A side by side comparison of the two faces is helpful.



The woman on the right appears to match—same nose, small mouth, deep set eyes and full face.  Both of these images could depict Elenor (or a sister).

Here's a photo of a sister Harriet South Reynolds, with her two children taken circa 1875:
 
wood1874 Harriet Ann South Reymolds-2 (2).jpg

Hope to see you at FGS! 



Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album



  • 1860s photos | Tintypes | women
    Sunday, August 24, 2014 8:18:32 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, August 17, 2014
    The Well-Dressed Couple Again and Solving a Group Photo Mystery
    Posted by Maureen

    Last week I showed you a picture of an unknown well-dressed couple circa 1905.

    Where there's one unidentified photo there are usually more. That's true for Amir Evenchik's collection of images. He owns several other pictures of the same couple taken a few years later. Unfortunately, no one can identify them.



    This one has a caption on it, "Henrik with Feige (a nickname for bird in Hebrew) taken in Baden-Baden." Henrik's gained a few pounds since the first image. The woman's suit and hat date this photo closer to 1910. Having a first name for the husband is a great clue, but it doesn't bring Amir any closer to figuring out their identity.  

    Since most of his ancestors lived in Poland or Belarus, then why are they in Baden-Baden, Germany? It was a popular tourist location, so perhaps the couple is on vacation, or they may be visiting relatives.

    His other unidentified photograph is a group portrait without a single person named.



    Figuring out who's in a big portrait can unlock other photo mysteries in the family. It's likely that there are other images of these 13 people taken later on. This image dates from the early 1900s. 



    • The matriarch of the family is front and center. She's an elderly woman. She wears an older style dress.

    • Are the two men flanking her her sons, or did the photographer place them on either side of her? At least one of them is likely her son, but it's possible that both of them are.

    • Working with that assumption, then the women sitting next to those men would be their wives.
    • Are the three women in the back row her daughters? If so, then there are five of her children in this portrait, two men and three women. The woman standing in the center is dressed very fashionably for the circa 1906 period.

    • The children in the picture are the matriarch's grandchildren.

    Solving a picture mystery like this is about breaking the image down into family groups (which children go with which parents), coming up with a series of assumptions, then testing them by looking at your family tree for possibilities. For instance, the youngest grandson sits on the left.  He's likely 8 to 10 years of age. If this picture was taken in 1906, then he was born in approximately 1896 to 1898. 

    There are plenty of variables in dating fashion from economic status to where the image was taken. The assumptions give you place to start.


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • group photos | hats | Jewish | men
    Sunday, August 17, 2014 5:23:51 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, August 10, 2014
    A Well-Dressed Couple
    Posted by Maureen



    Old pictures have a tendency to turn up unexpectedly. For Amir Evenchik, this photo was recently found at his parent's house. It's the usual story:  No one knows the identity of the couple or where they posed for this lovely formal portrait.

    Dating this photo is the easy part. Determining where an image was taken is a matter of matching up image clues with family history. Below are four clues (I've used Pixlr.com to create a numbered collage of the evidence):



    • Photos 1 and 3: In the early years of the 20th century, women wore their hair swept up in an exaggerated puff in front of the head. The goal was the S-shaped head-to-toe curve that was popular circa 1905. Undergarments helped women achieve this curve.

    Mid-decade, women wore little jackets over their dresses. This is a very fashionably dressed woman, whose outfit is complete with long gloves and a fan.


    • Photo 2: The woman's companion wears his mustache in the style of the late 1890s, when waxing facial hair created extreme twirls. It's a fad that remained common into the 20th century. Notice how the front of his hair has a wave. This was typical at the turn of the century.

    • Photo 4: Looking at a background can help you place a photo. This could be a unique, hand-painted design. The photographer probably used the same backdrop in many portraits. Locating other images taken in the same area with the same background could help determine where the couple is from. 


    Other factors to consider in identifying this image:
    • Does the couple look like any other family members?
    • Based on their appearance, this is a couple of financial means. 
    • Evenchik should estimate the couple's ages, then find couples on his family tree of the right ages around the time this photo was taken. 



    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1900-1910 photos | hairstyles | Jewish | men
    Sunday, August 10, 2014 1:54:39 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, August 03, 2014
    Family Reunions
    Posted by Maureen

    It's that time again: The every-other-year gathering of the Miller clan in Vermont. It grew from a gathering of siblings on a family farm in New York state to a cluster of cousins more than 60 years later. My husband's family is dedicated to keeping this tradition alive.

    Summer is the usual time for family reunions. In my husband's family we pose for photos in groups of families descended from the original siblings (all now deceased). Sitting or standing for family photographs is a time-honored part of a reunion experience.

    The photo below, from the collection of the Library of Congress, shows the Pershing family posing in 1923. It's a huge group of people, captured in a large panoramic image—these were quite popular in the early part of the 20th century. Today, panoramic images are usually found rolled up in a photo collection.



    For a better look at the original image, try this link. If you own one of these and no one has marked an X over the head of your grandmother or grandfather, it may take hours to figure out who's who.



    A short cut to start determining identities is to look at the center of the front row. That's usually where the oldest members of the family sit.

    While our reunion features photo albums of every gathering, there's a lot more we could do at the event. The Chart Chick, Janet Hovorka has Five Fabulous Family Reunion Ideas on her blog.

    As I head off for our reunion I have a few questions for you:
    • Have you ever attended or participated in a reunion?
    • What's the largest number of relatives in attendance? We usually have around 50 people with folks flying in from as far away as Australia! 
    • What type of family history activities take place at your family gatherings? The Pershings had an Infantry band on hand to entertain attendees:



    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • family reunion | panoramic photos
    Sunday, August 03, 2014 4:46:43 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [1]