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by Maureen A. Taylor

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# Tuesday, March 26, 2013
RootsTech 2013 Report
Posted by Maureen

It's easy to describe FamilySearch's RootsTech conference with one word: Wow!

Photos were the focus this year. Here are a few highlights:

Thank you to all the readers who stopped by to say hello. I provided photo consultations in the Bringing Stories to Life section of the exhibit hall.

Since the focus of the conference is technology, I decided to tweet some of the photos I saw. I used my iPad to photograph images and upload them to Twitter and Facebook. You can see them @photodetective on Twitter.  The most unusual image is of a man posed shaving. You'll also see a painted tintype. I'm hoping to share a very different type of photo mystery next week.

family search.jpg
A promo for uploading pictures to your FamilySearch family tree.

findmypast.jpg
Findmypast.com had an old-fashioned photo studio in the exhibit hall complete with props. How could I resist?

findmypast2.jpg

photofacematch.jpg
PhotoFaceMatch.com was just one of the new companies exhibiting.  This is a facial recognition site, and It's very interesting to see how this technology is developing. You can try the site for free.

pogue.jpg
On Saturday, David Pogue, personal technology columnist for the New York Times, gave the keynote speech complete with a grand piano. I'm a big fan of his columns and Missing Manual series of books.

Whether you were one of the close to 7,000 attendees or someone who watched the live streaming sessions from home, RootsTech was amazing. Can't wait until next year.

Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • photo backgrounds | Rootstech | snapshots | unusual photos
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 2:52:28 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 18, 2013
    Intinerant Tintype Artists and Your Family
    Posted by Maureen

    Jim Cat found this photo when his grandmother died. It's one of those family photo mysteries—Jim doesn't know who these women are.

    Cat2.jpg

    I love the way the photographer captured four young women sitting on their front stairs.

    Jim labeled it a daguerreotype, but it's actually a tintype. The spontaneous pose reminds the viewer of a paper snapshot. In fact, tintype "snapshots" were available long before George Eastman invented his amateur negative camera. The word snapshot refers to taking an "instantaneous" image using a handheld camera. It generally means an amateur was taking the picture, but there were professional photographers who specialized in capturing these fleeting moments.

    Itinerant tintypists traveled from town to town in wagons loaded with chemicals, plates and darkroom equipment. Tintype photographers also walked the streets of major cities enticing customers to memorialize their visit with a photo. 

    The tintype was usually presented to a customer in a paper sleeve. I've seen sleeves in bright pink, red, blue and just about every other shade. Some have embossed designs like this one, while others have printed decorations.

    What they all have in common is a tendency to deteriorate. If you own one of these early 20th-century tintypes in a paper sleeve, you should scan it at a high resolution—at least 600 dpi—to preserve the content.

    From the dress styles and the hair, the date of Jim's picture is circa 1910.  The short sleeves and lightweight fabric suggest a warm weather month.

    The woman second from the left has rested a hand on her adjacent companions, a clear sign these are close friends or relatives. Cat thinks these women may be family. I'm waiting for additional information to help with that detail.


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1910s photos | candid photos | snapshots | Tintypes | women
    Monday, March 18, 2013 2:12:06 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 11, 2013
    Smartphone Camera Tip: Viewing Old Negatives
    Posted by Maureen

    I'm a relatively new smartphone user. While I was waiting for an upgrade, lots of folks got iPhones and other types of smartphones. A few months ago, I finally qualified and picked up a Samsung Galaxy.  

    Some attendees to last month's Who Do You Think You Are? Live! show brought negatives with them for us to decipher. James Morley, of What's That Picture showed me a neat trick with the camera function. If you find yourself facing a batch of negatives at a relative's house and own a smart phone, try the following:
    • Select your camera app
    • Go to settings. On my phone it looks like a gear.
    • Select Effects
    • Select Negative

    Point your camera at the negative and take a picture. It becomes a positive image. This was taken quickly and it works for identification purposes.  It's only a low-resolution picture. Although this isn't a high quality picture worth printing, it's a great way to preview those negatives.

    editWDYTYA negative.jpg

    My apologies to the woman who brought in this glass negative—I can't find your name in my London notes. Thank you for letting me use your picture to illustrate this article.



    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • negatives | preserving photos | unusual photos
    Monday, March 11, 2013 4:02:37 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, March 03, 2013
    WDYTYA London and a Launch
    Posted by Maureen

    What a busy week! Last week at this time, I was walking through Shakespeare's birthplace recovering from two action-packed days of looking at photos at Who Do You Think You Are? Live! in London.  I have some pictures to share.

    As soon as I came home a new project launched: The Last Muster series of books that focus on images of Revolutionary War era folks is becoming a documentary. Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad shared the news. 

    If you're curious about what it's about, watch the trailer in Diane's post and read Judy Russell's blog post at The Legal Genealogist.

    Back to London.

    Guess who I saw when I was there?  Lisa Louise Cooke of the Genealogy Gems and Family Tree Magazine podcasts AND Janet Horvoka of Family Chart Masters, aka the Chart Chick. It was cold in London, thus my fleece jacket and scarf.

     WDYTYA1.jpg

    English genealogists love a certain American product too. Couldn't miss this booth:

    WDYTYA2.jpg

    Love to Learn, an English company specializing in online education, gave us a nice place to work with photographs. James Morley of What's That Picture.com and I met with folks on Friday and Saturday. The lines were long again this year. People waited up to two hours to show us their photos.

    WDYTYA4.jpg

    WDYTYA3.jpg

    We saw some amazing pictures, such as the pair of painted daguerreotypes held by these women.

    WDYTYA5.jpg

    This year I decided to count the number of pictures we saw. The total for the two days was over 500!


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • cased images | Photos from abroad | Revolutionary War | unusual clothing | women
    Sunday, March 03, 2013 6:40:38 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]