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# Monday, 26 December 2016
A Year of Passionate Photo Detecting: What Did You Miss?
Posted by Maureen

On this Photo Detective blog, 2016 was a year of early color (and colorized) photos, photo-ID tips and crowd-sourcing. 

If you missed the most-popular posts, don't worry. The links in this 2016 wrap-up will take you them.

Photo Identification Tips

Newspapers
We started the year off right with a big tip. Newspapers solved one woman's photo mystery—they might help with your pictures too. The King family case study shows you how to apply those tips.

Google
I made a breakthrough in my own family history this year. Google helped me locate images of all the ships on which my Civil War ancestor served. Can you say jackpot? Follow my tips and see what you discover.

Group Picture Mysteries
My favorite old photo this year was the group portrait with the girl sleeping (or blinking?) in the second row. Can you spot the clues in this Old Family Gathering photo?

Foreign Images
Captions in a foreign language or pictures taken in an unfamiliar-sounding place can be a research problem. In two columns, Foreign Caption Mystery and Caption Mystery, you can learn more about how how tackle this photo-identification trouble.

Can You Help Solve This Mystery?
Two high school- or college-aged girls are in this picture. The date is about 1910, but who are these young ladies, and where are they?  Read about the clues and see if you can help. 



Coloring the Past
Wherever you stand on the colorizing of photos, you'll find the images pretty neat to look at.

See how the details pop in a Thanksgiving tablescape colorized using Algorithma, an online coloring tool.

The Library of Congress has a very large collection of period color images called Photochroms. They're amazing!  The real scenes of ancestral hometowns will keep you mesmerized for hours.

Thank you for another fantastic year of family photo mysteries! Here's where to find instructions on how to share your mystery photos for possible free analysis on this blog. Can't wait to see what you'll share in 2017!


Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • Save
    1900-1910 photos | 1910s photos | enhanced images | family reunion | group photos | Photo fun | unusual photos
    Monday, 26 December 2016 20:32:34 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, 18 December 2016
    Dating Old Family Photos: Clues Under the Christmas Tree
    Posted by Maureen



    There are heaps of clues in this charming old picture of two children admiring their Christmas tree. It's an image from the Library of Congress, whose cataloging record dates it to between 1910 and 1935. That's a pretty big 25-year time frame. 

    Can you spot the clues in this picture? They include:
    • tree ornaments and trimmings
    • children's clothing
    • vintage train set
    • household decorations

    Keep reading for a little more about each clue.

    Tree Trimmings

     

    The glass tree topper in this picture looks a lot like the one my mother always put on our tree. F.W. Woolworth's led the American market by first selling glass ornaments made in Germany and later, ones made in the United States. There is a good chance your ancestors bought their tree trimmings at Woolworth's.

    Tinsel has a long history that dates back to Germany in 1610. By the 20th century, artificial, aluminum-based tree trimmings had replaced natural garland made from cranberries and popcorn. Some were lead-based. The FDA didn't restrict the sales of lead-based tree materials until 1971. 

    Clothing



    Bobbed hairstyles for girls became popular about 1915 and remained in style throughout the estimated time frame for this picture. Dropped-waist dresses for little girls debuted at about the same time, but this outfit has a scalloped hemline. Those were common in the early 1920s.

    Vintage Train Set



    A whole village with "snow"-frosted foliage rests under this tree. It's an electric train set with real street lights. It could belong to the children's father or be a gift for the Christmas shown.

    If you have a toy train collector in your family, show him or her this photo and let's see if they can date the era of this set. The National Toy Train Museum is another resource. Weigh in on this train set on our Facebook page.

    Household Decor

    Similar household decorations could be found in the Sears Catalog, which is digitized on Ancestry.com. (I'll look there for the train, too.) Dating photos based household items is difficult, because families would keep themse items for years. The rug in this house is well-worn with a big spot near the train track, so the curtains and carpet also could be several years old.

    Dating this picture relies on all the clues. The train could be key.

    Count The Clues in Your Own Images

    This image is a good example of how to break a picture down into clues. Establishing the dates for specific clues will not only help you verify the time frame for a picture, it'll also help you tell a holiday tale.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • Save
    children | Christmas
    Sunday, 18 December 2016 18:53:02 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [3]
    # Sunday, 11 December 2016
    Old-Photo Problem Solving: A Man Named "Christmas"
    Posted by Maureen

    Genealogists groan when they find a Smith, Brown or Taylor (don't I know it!) on their family trees.

    Common-name woes abound, but what about a name that triggers too many search results for a different reason: It's also a holiday. Take the surname Christmas, for instance.

    In searching for holiday-themed photos, I went to the Library of Congress website and started looking for pictures featuring Kwanzaa, Hanukkah and Christmas.

    That last one caused the problem. There were plenty of images relating to Dec. 25th but mixed in was a man's portrait titled "Christmas, Joseph." But is this Joseph?



    Let's start with the facts. According to the LOC cataloging record, the C.M. Bell studio of Washington, D.C., made this picture between February 1894 and February 1901. The studio was in business from 1873 to 1916. You can view more images by Bell on the Library of Congress website.

    Along the top left edge of this photo is a negative number:
     


    This young man in a striped silk bowtie has a sparse mustache, suggesting he might be in his late teens or early 20s. The bad areas on the right of the photo are damaged areas of the original negative.

    Now here's where the problem comes in. "Joseph Christmas" is written on the negative envelope. But that label doesn't specify if that's the name of the person pictured, or if this picture was taken for a client named Joseph Christmas. So is this Joseph Christmas or someone else?

    City directories for Washington, D.C., for this period list one Joseph Christmas. A quick Ancestry.com search for the name in 1898 plus or minus five years turns up a few possibilities, but none are a good match to the age of the man in this image. 

    In the 1900 census, there is a Joseph Christmas living in Washington, D.C., and born in Germany in 1838. Could he be a relative if the man pictured?

    It might take a Christmas miracle to solve this mystery, or at least a LOT more searching.

    Have you encountered problems like this in researching your own surname?



    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • Save
    1900-1910 photos | Christmas | men
    Sunday, 11 December 2016 21:28:51 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [8]
    # Sunday, 04 December 2016
    Colorized Old Photos Offer Rare Glimpses of Your Ancestors' World
    Posted by Maureen

    Recently a collection of colorized historical images of immigrants at Ellis Island went viral. It's a pretty snazzy group of pictures. And these images are historically accurate: The historians behind this project researched actual colors in use at the time. You can see the photos here.

    Somehow, the color makes the people seem more real. The black-and-white images seem to create a visual distance between us and them.  It's wonderful to have an idea of how our immigrant ancestors dressed and the colors they wore. 

    Did you know that the Library of Congress has a collection that shows our immigrant ancestors' hometowns? Every one of the images in that collection is in color. They're called "photochrom prints".



    Produced between 1890 and 1910 by Photoglob and the Detroit Publishing Co., they feature scenes popular with travelers—more than 6,000 photochrom prints of Europe and the Middle East, and 500 of the United States. Most are 6.5x9 inches.

    I'm in love with the collection. Not only can you time travel to foreign lands, but you can view images of people wearing their native costumes.  Get ready ... hours will go by before you think to look up from your screen!

    The newly reorganized Library of Congress user interface makes it easy to look at collection overviews, view specific collections organized by country or read articles on the topic.

    Let me know what you found out about ancestral homelands by viewing this collection.




    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • SaveSave
    photochrom
    Sunday, 04 December 2016 21:05:36 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, 27 November 2016
    Clues in a Curious Old Family Photo: The First Mannequin Challenge?
    Posted by Maureen

    It's not the first time a family photo begs the question "What were they thinking?" That's the case with this image of family sitting as though they're doing a mannequin challenge.



    The story behind this clowning for the camera has been lost, and the picture lacks identification. It was found in the collection of Sherry Yates' great-grandmother. Sherry and her mother wonder if the older woman in the middle could be Mary S. Veal Parker (1834-1908).



    Approximating Ages

    Mary was Sherry's great-great-grandmother, who lived in Glassboro, Gloucester County, NJ, and died in 1908. Whether this is Mary depends on the date of the image. The clothing clues suggest a date from just before 1908, so it's quite possible this is Mary. 

    If it is her, then identifying the rest of the folks may fall into place. A family group sheet of who's living and their ages in about 1905 should help with that task. The little boy in the front, for example, is around 5 years of age. 

    Interior Views
    When you find an indoor photo in your collection, take a good look around. It's a glimpse into the everyday life of your ancestors.

    In the days before HGTV, decorating ideas came from magazines, which included instructions on how to make table scarves and wall hangings.  Sometimes you can spot photos of other family members hanging on the wall.

    Have you spotted the frame on the left side?



    Unfortunately we can't enlarge it to see the picture itself. It looks like a group portrait—there are multiple heads.

    My favorite part of this picture is this duo (father and son?) staring into each others eyes in the foreground. So cute!



    Family group portraits are a challenge worth trying to solve.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • SaveSaveSave
    1900-1910 photos | group photos | unusual photos
    Sunday, 27 November 2016 20:30:56 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, 20 November 2016
    Colorizing Old Photos: A 1923 Thanksgiving Tablescape
    Posted by Maureen



    Our Ancestors' Thanksgiving

    Happy Thanksgiving! This 1920s table is set for a holiday meal. In 1923, the Underwood Co., publisher of stereoviews, sold this image. I'm not sure the intent of the picture, but perhaps it shows a model for our ancestors' idea of the perfect holiday meal.

    You can tell a story with a single picture. What do you see in this image?
    • two chairs
    • two candles
    • two place settings
    • a turkey (or perhaps a large chicken)
    • a cloth table covering
    • a basket cornucopia of fruits and vegetables (the centerpiece)

    Besides the table, this room has a hanging lamp, a couple of pictures on the wall and a combination sideboard/hutch (on the right).

    This picture gives us insight into the holiday festivities for this mythical couple. It's a time capsule of Thanksgiving in 1923.

    This particular image tells us that only two people were at dinner and that the turkey/chicken was the main part of the meal.

    Have you ever taken a picture of your holiday table before everyone sits down? I have. It helps me remember what we had for dinner that year, how I decorated the table (now called a "tablescape" on the decorating shows), how many people came, and who brought what dish.

    Colorize Old Pictures for a Look at Your Ancestor's World

    It's easy to imagine our ancestors' world as black and white, but of course they were surrounded by color. Algorithmia is a free site that helps you colorize black-and-white pictures to bring them closer to a real-life view.

    It's easy to use. Upload a picture to the site and see a comparison of the image in black and white, and color. You can move the purple line to see where the tinting happens. In this case, the stark-looking setting becomes a warm dining room. 




    Here's the colored image. Notice that not all of the items on the table were colorized. This isn't a professionally Photoshopped colorization with historically accurate shades, but it does enable you to quickly take a different look at your pictures.

    You can download the comparison and the final colorized image, albeit with the site's watermark.

     

    This Thanksgiving, take a break from the after-dinner clean-up and see  how this site transforms your old family photos. The dishes can wait.

    See others' colorized photos and share your favorite colorized photo with us on the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page. We'd love to see them!


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • SaveSave
    1920s photos | facebook | Photo fun | thanksgiving
    Sunday, 20 November 2016 16:59:49 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, 13 November 2016
    Behind the Scenes in Old Photos: How Your Ancestors Got The Thanksgiving Turkey
    Posted by Diane


    Few tables in America are without a turkey on Thanksgiving Day. It's an old tradition to roast a bird (although whether a turkey was actually at the Pilgrims' Thanksgiving is unknown).

    This father, accompanied by his young son, went to pick out a turkey big enough for their family gathering. (See the picture larger here.) In the middle of the photo, the poultry farmer weighs a turkey on a scale. The two men on the right of the image may be buying that particular specimen. Behind them are a lot of turkey's already cleaned and ready for purchase.  Doesn't look like they sell gravy and potatoes like the farm I used to go to though!

    The Bain News Agency took this image around 1910-1915. It's a great everyday scene captured for a newspaper. The George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress contains thousands of images of newsworthy pictures.

    This photo connects us to our ancestors. For years I visited a turkey farm to purchase the main course, but most nowadays get a frozen or fresh turkey from the grocery store. Our ancestors either shot one, took one from their own poultry stock or bought one in a setting like this. They were also available in city butcher shops.

    While shopping is usually done by women in the family, from this image it appears that obtaining the turkey was man's work. It was usually Mom's job to pluck and clean the bird.

    Preserve your Thanksgiving celebration by making like a news photographer:
    • If you buy your turkey at a farm, take a picture. That farm may not always be around. By doing so you're documenting a bit of local history.

    • I'm not sure how a grocery store would feel about you taking pictures as you shop, but imagine your grandchildren looking back on that image years from now. What would be familiar or foreign to them?

    • Using a video app on your smart phone, make a movie of a relative preparing a traditional side-dish or dessert. If they'd rather not be photographed, try zooming in on their hands and the ingredients.
    • Take pictures of guests. You can also delegate that responsibility to a younger member of the family, and have the child ask each person a family history question.

    The StoryCorps Great American Thanksgiving Listen encourages families to share stories this holiday. You may be asked by a student in your family for an interview. If not, be the person to bring up family history!


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • SaveSaveSaveSave
    1900-1910 photos | storycorps | thanksgiving
    Sunday, 13 November 2016 18:54:04 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, 06 November 2016
    Clues in a 1900s Mystery Photo of the Old Family Farm
    Posted by Maureen



    Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Planning a menu for that important family meal makes me think about how all that food ended up on my grandmother's table. There are no farmers in my family history, so I love to see reader's photos of rural life. 

    Darlene Sampley has this lovely picture of an unidentified farm family. Dad sits on horse-drawn sickle mower, pointing at something.[Thank you to reader Jim TeVogt for identifying the mower.] He's in the front yard with a team of horses. The barns—it looks like there are two—are in front of him. Anyone recognize the farm equipment?

    A Google Image search for farming equipment 1900 (about when the photo was taken—see below) turned up plows with similar wide metal wheels.

    The house has three chimneys. The attached building on the left could be the kitchen.

    What else do you see?

    This is a poor-quality image. I've enhanced this copy by playing with contrast and sharpening features in Adobe PhotoShop Elements. It looks better with these variations of color than a pure grayscale version did.

    Did you spot the boy and his dog in the foreground?



    How many children are on the porch?




    (Left to right) Mom stands holding an older baby/toddler, an older sister stands to the right and next to her a little girl.

    We know several things about this family: There are four children (at least one boy) ranging in age from about 1 year to preteen. They live on a farm. I've estimated that this picture was taken about 1900. It's hard to see the details, but from the scant clothing clues this could fit the time frame.

    A next step would be examining the 1900 census for any matches in Darlene's family tree. There's a statistical table for agriculture with the 1900 census but it lacks the specific details, including farm owners' names, present in earlier agricultural censuses.

    I'm hoping Darlene can put names with these fuzzy faces. Can you add anything to this story?


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • Save
    1900-1910 photos | enhanced images | farming | group photos
    Sunday, 06 November 2016 21:35:53 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, 30 October 2016
    Death Photography: Is it For Real?
    Posted by Maureen

    Forget all those postmortem photography slideshows that have gone viral, like this one. Only a few of these photos that supposedly show deceased people are actual postmortem images.

    Many of these supposed postmortem images show people who are very much alive and posing stiffly due to exposure times of up to 20 minutes, perhaps supported by metal braces photographers often used with subjects to help them remain still. Or a photographer may have darkened a person's blue eyes so they show up better (which does give a creepy effect).

    Photographing the dead is an old tradition. Photo history author Dr. Stanley Burns divides postmortem photos into two types: "One portrays the person in death, and the other ... poses the person as if they were still alive."

    Some of his collection is part of an exhibit called Securing the Shadow:Posthumous Portraiture in America, at the American Folk Art Museum in New York City through Feb. 27. It shows how to spot photographs and other art that truly memorializes the deceased.

    Thank you to Dr. Stanley Burns and the American Folk Art Museum for allowing me to use two images from the exhibit.

    Children were commonly photographed after death. Epidemics and the lack of modern antibiotics raised the mortality rate of infants and small children, and a postmortem photo might be the family's only picture of a child. Here, a grieving father poses with his baby. Sometimes the whole family surrounded the deceased in a last chance for a family portrait.  


    c. 1860

    Check women's listings in the 1900 or 1910 US census to compare the number of their children born versus the number still living. It can be shocking.

    An obvious sign of death in a portrait is a body in a coffin. The body may be adorned with flowers or for a child, a favorite toy.

     
    c. 1844

    In this image from a 2008 blog post, the family gathers behind the casket at a funeral.


    Some photographers did employ techniques to make a deceased person look more life-like. That included tying a person to a chair or tying their chin so that the mouth wouldn't open. Hand-coloring the image could enhance the image. 

    Mourning images are more common than postmortem images. Spot  evidence of a death in your family album by watching for the following.
    • a woman wearing jewelry, such as a brooch or pendant, made with hair and featuring a photo
    • a photo featuring dead flowers or arrangements of flowers with a picture in the center.

    • A person holding a photograph of a person who has died.
    • a woman dressed in black, but this is tricky. Dark colors and even some bright ones, like orange, appear black in old photos. And our ancestors might wear other colors while mourning. Some mourners wore lavender, depending on their relationship to the deceased.

    If you're not sure whether you have a postmortem photograph, look for death records, newspaper obituaries or a mention in a family document dating from the same time as the photo.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

  • SaveSaveSave
    men | mourning photos | negatives | postmortem | props in photos
    Sunday, 30 October 2016 19:02:16 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, 23 October 2016
    How to ID Strange Faces in Six Kinds of Old Group Photos
    Posted by Maureen

    Whether an old family photo has two or 20 people (or more), it's considered a group portrait. When you find one in your collection, it may generate a groan rather than a cheer. Solving those types of picture mysteries is a challenge and a some might say a curse. You have to figure out the identity of all of those people!

    Let's look at several types of group portraits.

    Sporting Groups


    This group of tennis players posed between 1870 and 1880. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

    Our ancestors participated in sports: tennis, baseball, basketball and football, to name a few. When you see an ancestor with equipment or in uniforms, you might need help figuring out what sport was being played.  Start by looking at city directory listings for clubs and organizations in your ancestor's hometown.

    Family Reunions and Gatherings



    Family group portraits cover everything from picnics to weddings to family reunions.

    Joseph Martin's family gathered at Belle Island Park outside Detroit. In my  Four Tips to Identify Group Portraits, you'll find techniques to sort out who's who in a family gathering photo. Figuring out time and place and matching up faces are just parts of the puzzle. Use a chart to track how old people were in relevant years, then use the picture as bait to get cousins involved in the search.

    School Pictures
    I have one and you might, too—a class photo. While you might not remember all the names of your classmates, posting the image on social media can help you renew friendships and connections. If it's a class photo from an earlier generation, social media is still a good option. Photographers sold copies, so it's likely you're not the only one with the picture. 

    Work Photos
    A group portrait might be several people posed at work. Use your family history research to determine where your ancestor found employment.  Census documents and city directories are a good beginning.

    Organizational Dinners
    Fraternal organizations and social groups often gathered for dinners in hotels. These yard-long pictures are often rolled up in a box. You don't necessarily need to know the names of everyone in those pictures, but it would be great to find your relatives. Looking for their faces in the crowd requires patience and a good magnifying glass.

    Military Images
    Men and women in uniform often posed for big group pictures of the people they served with. Some are informal snapshots taken by one of the group while others are formal pictures to document their unit.




    I'm still trying to identify these women. If you know of any women who served in the transportation corp at Montgomery Air Force base in World War II, let me know. This is one of five snapshots I have of these women.



    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

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    group photos | women | World War II
    Sunday, 23 October 2016 18:09:04 (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]