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by Maureen A. Taylor

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# Sunday, September 28, 2014
One More Photo of Ancestors Goofing Around
Posted by Maureen

A big thank you to Carol Jacobs Norwood! She sent me this 1937 photo of her father at age 16, clowning for the camera in a playpen, wearing a baby bonnet and holding a baby bottle.



Carol thinks this picture was taken at her father's home in Gardenville, Bucks County, Pa.

My question to Carol is whose playpen was it? Did her dad have a baby sibling or was a baby visiting? Or perhaps the family was cleaning out the attic?

Ever wonder if people ever smiled in photos? Go to the Library of Congress online Prints and Photographs catalog and search using the word smiling.  It's actually a picture subject heading.  

Got a funny picture you'd like to share?  Please submit it and I'll share it here.


Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1930s photos | snapshots | unusual photos
    Sunday, September 28, 2014 9:59:58 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, August 25, 2013
    The Marsteller Old-Photo Mystery
    Posted by Maureen

    Last week I outlined the mystery of the Ralph Marsteller photo.  This week I'm back with more details.
    StaffordFamily photo Ralph Reinhardt Marsteller_edited-1.jpg
    Let's start with some basics.

    What are they wearing?
    Clothing clues can be very helpful, BUT it's important to remember that there were lots of different styles every season and people didn't automatically wear the most current fashion. I look for details that help create a time frame. In this image, the most fashionably dressed woman is standing in the back on the far left.

    Staffordhat.jpg

    Fashion research suggests that this woman posed for this picture in 1918.  The lightweight fabric worn by everyone in the picture suggests a warm weather month. These little details could help pinpoint when Ralph Marsteller met his family or friends.

    In 1918, broad-brimmed hats with an upturned edge returned. You could buy a similar hat in the Sears Catalog for that year. Widespread collars were very popular on dresses in this period as well.

    stafford boy.jpg

    These lightweight suits for little boys appeared in mail-order catalogs circa 1914 and were still popular four years later. They were recommended for boys 2 to 6 years of age and cost approximately 70 cents. So this boy's attire places him in an age group.

    Who's Not in the Picture?
    Patti Stafford knows that Ralph's wife Eva isn't in the photo, and it doesn't look like their teenage son is here either—none of the children are the right age to be him. Nor is their daughter Arlene in this picture; these girls look too young.

    Who's Who?
    If this picture was taken about 1918, then Ralph's son Ralph could be the little boy in the military style suit. He'd be 5 years old.

    It's also possible that Ralph's sister is in the picture along with her husband and their children. More research into this angle could result in an identification.

    The older woman is not Ralph's mother. She was deceased by this time, but this woman could be an aunt who resembles some of the people in the photo.

    stafford older woman.jpg

    Ralph's mother Dianna Jane Rumfeld/Rumfield had sisters with small children at the time of this picture. This could be a gathering of the Rumfeld/Rumfields, rather than the Marstellers.

    Ralph's brother Henry is still living, so Patti's next step is to show him this photo to see if he can identify anyone in it.

    Research often turns up overlooked information. When Ralph's father William died, a Mr. Snyder was appointed guardian for him. While going through all the family paperwork looking for a connection, Patti found an interesting detail. Dianna Jane's marriage certificate states that her last name was Rumfeld/Rumfield. Her death certificate states that Dianna's mother was Louisa Snyder. This detail suggests that Snyder was a family member.

    I'm hopeful that Henry can put names with the rest of faces, but for now it looks like Patti has a picture of her grandfather and his father taken in about 1918.


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1910s photos | group photos | men | snapshots | women | World War I
    Sunday, August 25, 2013 4:30:43 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Tuesday, March 26, 2013
    RootsTech 2013 Report
    Posted by Maureen

    It's easy to describe FamilySearch's RootsTech conference with one word: Wow!

    Photos were the focus this year. Here are a few highlights:

    Thank you to all the readers who stopped by to say hello. I provided photo consultations in the Bringing Stories to Life section of the exhibit hall.

    Since the focus of the conference is technology, I decided to tweet some of the photos I saw. I used my iPad to photograph images and upload them to Twitter and Facebook. You can see them @photodetective on Twitter.  The most unusual image is of a man posed shaving. You'll also see a painted tintype. I'm hoping to share a very different type of photo mystery next week.

    family search.jpg
    A promo for uploading pictures to your FamilySearch family tree.

    findmypast.jpg
    Findmypast.com had an old-fashioned photo studio in the exhibit hall complete with props. How could I resist?

    findmypast2.jpg

    photofacematch.jpg
    PhotoFaceMatch.com was just one of the new companies exhibiting.  This is a facial recognition site, and It's very interesting to see how this technology is developing. You can try the site for free.

    pogue.jpg
    On Saturday, David Pogue, personal technology columnist for the New York Times, gave the keynote speech complete with a grand piano. I'm a big fan of his columns and Missing Manual series of books.

    Whether you were one of the close to 7,000 attendees or someone who watched the live streaming sessions from home, RootsTech was amazing. Can't wait until next year.

    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • photo backgrounds | Rootstech | snapshots | unusual photos
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 2:52:28 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 18, 2013
    Intinerant Tintype Artists and Your Family
    Posted by Maureen

    Jim Cat found this photo when his grandmother died. It's one of those family photo mysteries—Jim doesn't know who these women are.

    Cat2.jpg

    I love the way the photographer captured four young women sitting on their front stairs.

    Jim labeled it a daguerreotype, but it's actually a tintype. The spontaneous pose reminds the viewer of a paper snapshot. In fact, tintype "snapshots" were available long before George Eastman invented his amateur negative camera. The word snapshot refers to taking an "instantaneous" image using a handheld camera. It generally means an amateur was taking the picture, but there were professional photographers who specialized in capturing these fleeting moments.

    Itinerant tintypists traveled from town to town in wagons loaded with chemicals, plates and darkroom equipment. Tintype photographers also walked the streets of major cities enticing customers to memorialize their visit with a photo. 

    The tintype was usually presented to a customer in a paper sleeve. I've seen sleeves in bright pink, red, blue and just about every other shade. Some have embossed designs like this one, while others have printed decorations.

    What they all have in common is a tendency to deteriorate. If you own one of these early 20th-century tintypes in a paper sleeve, you should scan it at a high resolution—at least 600 dpi—to preserve the content.

    From the dress styles and the hair, the date of Jim's picture is circa 1910.  The short sleeves and lightweight fabric suggest a warm weather month.

    The woman second from the left has rested a hand on her adjacent companions, a clear sign these are close friends or relatives. Cat thinks these women may be family. I'm waiting for additional information to help with that detail.


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1910s photos | candid photos | snapshots | Tintypes | women
    Monday, March 18, 2013 2:12:06 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]