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by Maureen A. Taylor

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# Monday, April 14, 2014
Donating a Piece of History
Posted by Maureen

Now that Yvette LaGonterie knows that the mystery photo discovered in her grandparents' house doesn't show her family members, she asked me for advice on donating the image.

The man in the family portrait LaGonterie found is Rev. George Frazier Miller, one of the founding members of the Niagara Movement, the predecessor of the NAACP.

This is a question I'm asked on a fairly regular basis.  If you decide you'd like to pass on a photographic bit of history, first find an appropriate facility. Yvette wondered if she should donate the image to Howard University. Rev. Miller graduated from Howard.

It's a good idea to call a library, historical society or archive first to see if it would be interested in your donation. So I called and spoke with woman who works with prints and photographs at the university. She would love to have the photo in the university collection, but there's a gift process that's pretty typical when an organization considers accepting donated material:
  • Staff would like to meet with Yvette, either over the phone or in person (if she's in the area). It's important to discuss all the details of the prospective gift.
  • Archivists and librarians want to see the condition of the original.  This can also be done virtually using a scan of the photo.
  • The next step is for the library to draw up a deed of gift that outlines everything discussed.
  • Once the parties sign the deed of gift, the university receives a copy and so does the donor.
It looks like Yvette's picture will have another home. <smile>  Have you ever donated items to a historical or genealogical society?  Please share your experiences in the comment section below.


Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • 1900-1910 photos | photo news
    Monday, April 14, 2014 4:27:15 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [2]
    # Monday, January 30, 2012
    Posting Photos Online
    Posted by Maureen

    This week genealogists from all over are gathering in Salt Lake City to talk technology at RootsTech. Unfortunately, I won't be there this year, although I might check out some of the virtual offerings.

    I'm trying to finish research on a second volume of my Last Muster: Images of the Revolutionary War Generation.

    There are a lot of great websites out there that enable folks to share pictures and stories. Before I list them, here are some basic tips before you post your pictures in the global world of the web.

    • Don't upload images larger than 72 dpi. That resolution is perfect for the web, but anyone trying to copy your image won't end up with a very good print.

    • Make sure you own the photo (or have written permission to post). I wouldn't want my cousins posting family photographs online that I own and you probably wouldn't your cousins to do so either.

    • Don't post images of living people. Genealogists generally recommend not posting information on living individuals and that rule applies to photos as well.  

    Now let's get to the fun part. Websites!  I have my personal favorites. Oh— did I mention that most of these sites are FREE?

    • History Pin.  Take a tour of the world or your neighborhood in the photos on this site.  There are "sets" of images that focus on themes.  This website just won an award for the best mobile app. Try it and see.

    • 1000Memories.  Need an online place to share your photos, stories and family videos, then check out this site.  I was stunned to see the possibilities. 

    • Dear Photograph. This is a really cool idea. Take a photograph of a place today then upload it and a historical photo of the same place. The juxtaposition of the two images is a lot of fun.

    • Ancient Faces and Dead Fred.  These two reunion websites can help you reconnect with "missing" family photographs.

    Let's not forget that you can upload images to genealogical sites such as Ancestry.com and MyHeritage.com.

    I'm trying to beat the winter blahs and maybe you are, too. On my personal website, I'm having a Silly Old Snapshot Contest.  Upload an image, get folks to vote on it and you might end up winning a prize package. The contest ends on February 25. 


    Solve your family photo mysteries with these books by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Fashionable Folks: Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

  • Photo fun | photo news | unusual photos | Web sites
    Monday, January 30, 2012 2:46:41 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [5]
    # Tuesday, June 08, 2010
    Photo Detective—Online and On the Road
    Posted by Maureen

    I hope to see you this month in Boston; Burbank, Calif.; or Wellington, Kan. I'm always looking for photos to feature in this space and in the Photo Detective column of Family Tree Magazine, so I hope you'll stop by and say hello (and bring a mystery photo if you have one)!

    June 9th  New England Historic Genealogical Society, 6 pm
    This is the official kick-off for my new book, The Last Muster: Images of the Revolutionary War Generation (Kent State University Press). I've spent at least eight years gathering images and vignettes of veterans, their wives and some significant children who lived during the American Revolution and  lived into the age of photography.

    June 11-13th  Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree
    I'll be there in the Family Tree Magazine booth in the exhibit hall as well as giving two lectures—Hairsteria: Hair in Family Photos and Identifying and Dating Family Photographs.  I can't wait for Saturday's  live podcast hosted by Lisa Louise Cooke of Genealogy Gems and Family Tree Magazine's podcast. Lisa invited me to talk about The Last Muster project.  

    June 18th  Kansas Council of Genealogical Societies Conference
    At this all day seminar I'll be covering identifying nineteenth and twentieth family photographs in two talks: Identifying and Dating Family Photographs and Kodak Moments and Technicolor Dreams. The rest of the day I'll be focusing on telling the family story and modern genealogical research techniques.

    NBC's "Who Do You Think You Are" has made genealogy and family photos a popular topic outside of family history world. The website Glo.com called to chat about trends in the field. I got a chance to talk about a few of my favorite things, including safely displaying family photographs and those lovely pages on Footnote. You'll find more on my conversation with Glo.com in their article and online slideshow, It's a Family Affair.

    I'll be back next week with a report from Jamboree! 

    Visit ShopFamilyTree.com for books and CDs that'll help you research, preserve and display your family photos.


    Photo fun | photo news
    Tuesday, June 08, 2010 5:42:16 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Monday, May 03, 2010
    NGS Wrap-Up
    Posted by Maureen

    Wow. Wow. Wow. That's all I heard at last week's National Genealogical Society conference. It really was fantastic!  More than 2,700 individuals attended the four day event.  I got to meet blog fans, see Facebook friends and examine great photos. I presented lectures on 19th century picture analysis, 20th century photos in family collections and one on immigrant clues in images. 

    When I wasn't lecturing I was in the exhibit hall giving private photo consultations and looking at photo-related stuff for sale.  Here's a snapshot view of some of the items I thought you'd be interested in.

    I love these photo blocks from Echo Road. You personalize them using copies of your family photos.



    Have fun with your photos by using them in games, such as a deck of cards.  These are from the folks at Ancestry Games.



    I browsed from booth to booth looking for creative ways to express family history and found these lovely framed interpretations of a pedigree chart from Jill Means of Legacy Design.



    Unfortunately, I don't have pictures of some of the other items I saw, but definitely take a look at these websites: 
    • John E. Groberg of Geneartogy had some beautiful oversize photo trees in his booth. 
    • Stories by Me had a selection of photo blocks, games, magnets and other items that you could personalize using copies of your photos.
    • If you're looking for a way to organize and incorporate your photos into your family history, check out Photo Loom.
    Back next week with a new photo mystery! I need to rest from all the conference excitement <smile>.

    Photo fun | photo news
    Monday, May 03, 2010 9:10:33 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 15, 2010
    London Report Part 2
    Posted by Maureen

    On the last day of the Who Do You Think You Are? Live! family history show in London, I spent time in the military pavilion. The booths in the event are grouped by type of vendor. That means all the Irish vendors are in one area, Scottish in another, and all the general larger vendors are in the center of the hall.

    This year the military booths were all upstairs on the balcony. There were specific experts there to look at military memorabilia—badges, uniforms, and swords for instance. This is an interesting concept.  I'd love to see more military groups involved at US genealogy conferences.

    First stop was the Royal British Legion which had a display of poppies. This group has a travel group, Poppy Travel. They coordinate tours of military sites. Folks show them pictures taken during a war and they can put together a tour based on the locations in the images. I had a nice chat with Frank Baldwin of Poppy Travel standing next to the man constructed out of poppies.



    Next, I spent time in The War Graves Photographic Project speaking with Project coordinator Steve Rogers (below). If you have an ancestor who died in an overseas conflict and was buried there, this is a website worth a second glance. They are photographing all the non-US military graves. The website explains:
    The aim of The War Graves Photographic Project is to photograph every war grave, individual memorial, MoD grave, and family memorial of serving military personnel from WWI to the present day and make these available within a searchable database. 
    It's an ambitious project with the goal of documenting 1.75 million graves!



    The Royal Air Force Museum also had a booth. I collected information that may solve a friend's research dilemma.

    The Western Front Association booth drew my attention because of a large poster of the Missing Men of the Somme. It's a collection of pictures of men missing in action from World War I.



    This booth also had an online database of World War I cemeteries.



    I spent the rest of my trip visiting friends who took me to Windsor Castle and the area around Stonehenge. They've been recently bitten by the genealogy bug (gasp!). It's turning into a one-name study of their last name—Chun. Turns out there were only 40-something people with that surname in the 1881 British census. If you're researching anyone with the Chun surname, e-mail me.

    What a trip! I looked at lots of picture, gave a lecture, finally got to see Windsor Castle and learned a lot of new things.  I also bought new images to use in my lectures and articles. <smile> 

    I'll be back next week with a picture submitted by one of you.

    Genealogy events | Military photos | organizations | photo news
    Monday, March 15, 2010 12:41:12 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Monday, October 26, 2009
    Photo Sites: Read the Fine Print
    Posted by Maureen

    Yesterday's New York Times featured an article, Guardians Of Their Smiles, on the uses and abuses of photo sites. In it, a woman had posted baby pictures to Flickr without using the privacy settings, and later discovered that someone had used her daughter's pictures on a social networking site in Brazil. 

    The article mentioned several other examples, including a father who posted a video of a school play on a video site. Parents of the other kids complained and demanded he take it down.

    So here's the question: "How do you safeguard your online photo identity?"
    • Start by reading the fine print before clicking the "I Agree" box for any website. You might be allowing others to copy and use your family photographs. Sure, sites like the Library of Congress use Flickr to promote their photo collections, but those images are in the public domain.

    • Use privacy settings. You can disable those public features on popular sites by finding their privacy controls and activating them. On YouTube, you can privately share videos or prevent downloading/sharing online.

    • If you want to publish photos of an event, either have folks sign a model release that states how and where you'll publish those images, or don't show faces. A few months ago, I gave a workshop for kids and I really wanted to show off their genealogy artwork in my e-newsletter. Since I didn't want to use their faces, I had the kids hold up their projects in front of their faces. I used the picture, but didn't name the kids. Basically, don't use images without permission.

    • Watch for right-click copying. You can copy all kinds of things on the web by right-clicking with your mouse (control-clicking on a Mac). Should you? No. It's a ethical thing. I use a photo site that allows me to turn off the right-click option. Family members can order prints if they want to, but not copy the images. You also can put a watermark on images to discourage usage. It's an option in many types of photo editing software, that's what many photo stock houses do.

    • Don't put high-resolution images online. For online use, you don't need to use an image at more than 72 dpi. This doesn't prevent online copying, but at that resolution, print quality is awful.
    The New York Times article was a cautionary tale for anyone posting images online.  You can sound off in the comment section below or on the Photo Detective Forum.


    photo news | Photo-sharing sites
    Monday, October 26, 2009 1:47:12 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Tuesday, July 21, 2009
    Photos on the Web: Copyright Woes
    Posted by Maureen

    If you've ever tried to copy a family photo at a store or photo lab and been denied due to copyright issues, there's an article you might be interested in.

    On July 19, the New York Times published an article about photos on Wikipedia, "Wikipedia May Be a Font of Facts but It's a Desert for Photos."

    If you've used this vast internet archive of user-contributed material, you know the picture quality/quantity is iffy. That's because these are "unofficial" photos anyone can use. According to the article, the site uses a "Creative Commons license, which allows anyone to use an image, for commercial purposes or not, as long as the photographer is credited." It's a bit more complicated, but the article explains it. 

    There are legal and common-sense rules relating to photo usage. Basically, the store with the photo kiosk denied you the right to copy your picture because the photographer holds the reproduction rights for it. Even if the photographer is deceased or you don't know who it was, as for an old family portrait, the store might decide it doesn't want to take the chance.

    A handy guide for when you need formal permission to use an image appears in Sharon DeBartolo Carmack's Carmack's Guide to Copyright & Contracts: A Pricer for Genealogists, Writers & Researchers (GPC, $15.95)

    Here's a common sense rule for internet usage of family photos. If you want to post a photo of a living family member on your Web site or FaceBook page, make sure you have that person's permission, too. It's a common courtesy.


    photo news | Photo-sharing sites
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 2:55:56 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [2]
    # Monday, March 02, 2009
    London Wrap-Up Part 1
    Posted by Maureen

    A big thank you to Diane for posting a couple of pictures in this space last week.  London was fantastic! I'm a bit jet-lagged from the travel and tired (but excited) about all the things I saw at the Who Do You Think You Are? Live show last weekend.  This is an event I've wanted to attend for a couple of years, but the timing was never right.  However, this year's schedule was perfect. 

    While WDYTYA is really a trade show, there are a few different lecture tracks. Some are even free.  At American genealogy conferences you pay a general admission fee, but at the London event you only purchase tickets for specific lectures on a first-come first-served basis.

    If you took a look at the two pictures you get a sense of just how popular this event is. The Facebook friends I posed with wanted to get there early. We waited in line for about an hour, but it was worth it.  Guess who secured the number one spots in the queque?  We did.

    When the doors opened we were ready. Estimates for Saturday's attendance were as high as four thousand people. On Saturday the crowds were even larger and the line continued around the building even at noon. Each new Olympia/Kensington train brought loads of new folks to the event.  I have lots to share over the next few weeks. 

    I'll start with a few photos so you can get a sense of the size and scope of the show.

    IMG_3292.JPG
    Here's one of the free lectures taught by FindMyPast.com.

    IMG_3290.JPG

    2009 is the year of the Gathering in Scotland. I spend some time in the booth talking about my McDuff line. He told me that there currently isn't a Chieftain of the McDuff clan. The Gathering brings all the clans together for events. I put my name in for a free drawing. My fingers are crossed.<smile>.

    IMG_3306.JPG
    The crowds on day 2.

    I'll be back in the next few weeks with more.  I'll also post an album on my FaceBook profile.

    I can't wait until next year!


    Genealogy events | photo news
    Monday, March 02, 2009 4:03:23 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, September 07, 2008
    FGS Wrap-up
    Posted by Maureen

    As readers of this blog know, I had a booth at last week's Federation of Genealogical Societies conference.

    Wow! A lot of you stopped by to say hello and share your photo stories. Yes, some people brought photos with them, too <smile>. I also got to meet several FaceBook friends and fans. It was a tremendous amount of fun and very exhausting. Thank you for visiting with me!

    My train ride home during Tropical Storm Hanna was something I'm not going to forget for a very long time. Who knew it could take 11 hours to go from Philadelphia to Boston? A series of misadventures, including the train hitting a tree across the tracks, made for a lively overnight experience.

    My favorite part of the conference (aside from meeting all the readers of Family Tree Magazine in attendance) was walking around the exhibit hall checking out news at the booths.

    For instance, I got to meet Kim Screen of Good Stock Press & Bindery. This creative woman takes family history publishing to a new level. Yes, her books are expensive, but the final product is worth every penny. She produces limited edition books (and other heirloom items) that are so beautiful you can't help but flip through them. Her illustrated family histories are particularly wonderful. Her clients provide all the text, photos and other illustrations and Kim transforms their genealogy into a work of family history art. 

    My advice...spend some time on her Web site and explore the creative possibilities for your family history publishing endeavor. I know I will.


    photo news
    Sunday, September 07, 2008 4:24:18 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Tuesday, August 26, 2008
    Postmortem Images
    Posted by Maureen

    Remember how last week I mentioned that this column would feature a "viewer discretion advised" image? The sight of a deceased person in a photo is the reason for the warning.

    Like it or not, our ancestors began photographing the dead members of their family in the early 1840s. If you think you'll find such an image disturbing or unsettling, please don't continue reading. 

    Theresa Klepadlo-Berio submitted this photo with the following e-mail message: "I have had this photograph for years and have always wondered it it's an actual funeral or what...All I know is that it was in an old photo album of my grandparents' and they were from Poland."

    terri082508weird.jpg

    It is in fact a funeral. The elderly woman in the casket is being photographed before her burial. The people surrounding her are probably family members. This picture is a key to her family history in Poland, and a a great example of how one photograph can help you connect with your heritage.

    I spent a bit of time fixing the contrast and adjusting the sharpness of this image using my favorite photo editing tool—Picnik. (It's free!) Once I improved the picture the markings on the side of the coffin jumped out at me.

    terri082508weird2.jpg

    The words are still very difficult to read, but I took a chance and entered what I thought I saw into Google. Eureka! The words are spoczywaj w pokoju pax.

    On the Pennsylvania USGenWeb Tombstone Transcription Project Web site was a translation: "Rest in Peace." A closeup of the woman's hands isn't clear enough for reproduction here, but she's holding a cloth and either a book or a photograph.

    I immediately called Terri and asked her more about her family. Turns out there's a family tradition of photographing the dead! This is the only postmortem picture in her collection, but as we chatted she mentioned that her father's family used to pose relatives around the deceased. That suggests that this image here contains at least a few relatives. But who?

    That's something I hope to write more about in the near future. Terri's going to send me some information on her family history. With any luck we'll be able to figure out who's who and when this was taken.

    This image is also a good example of how the picture is just one piece of the family puzzle. Forensic research is needed to put the whole story together. More later...

    In a related piece of news, a story this month in the Ventura County Star focused on one photographer's fine art pictures of parents with their deceased infants. Historically, mothers have long posed for a final picture with their deceased infants. The imges are usually heartbreaking and really upsetting to view. However, photographer Leila Jones' work at the Simi Valley Hospital transcends the grief.  She does an amazing job of capturing these last moments.


    photo news | Photos from abroad
    Tuesday, August 26, 2008 3:18:18 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [4]
    # Monday, August 18, 2008
    Meet the Photo Detective, Online and at FGS
    Posted by Maureen

    I'll be at the Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference in Philadelphia Sept. 2-6, and I hope I'll see you there. You can visit with me in my booth, #304, in the conference exhibit hall. It's a great chance to chat with me about your family photos or just stop by to say hi. Please do! I like meeting the folks who submit photos to this column. 

    At the conference, I'll also be presenting a workshop on identifying and preserving family photos. It's not too late to sign up for this special offering. You can register for the conference online until Aug. 22 at 5 p.m. Central time.  

    Last week the e-zine/blog Shades of the Departed asked me to write a short piece about the wedding photos I collect. I met the author of this informative and wonderful photo site, The Footnote Maven, through FaceBook. We're kindred spirits when it comes to old photos. Check out the story. I talk about seven of the images from my personal (though not my family) collection. If you've ever cried at wedding, then be advised. You'll need a tissue.

    Next week I'll feature a photo in this space that'll carry a warning, "Viewer discretion advised." Now doesn't that pique your interest!


    photo news | Web sites
    Monday, August 18, 2008 9:12:24 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Sunday, June 01, 2008
    How to Submit Your Mystery Photo to the Photo Detective
    Posted by Maureen

    Do you have shoeboxes filled with unidentified family photographs? Let photo historian Maureen A. Taylor lend a hand.

    You can submit a mystery photograph for Taylor to analyze online in the Photo Detective blog or in Family Tree Magazine's print Photo Detective column.
    See the Photo Detective blog for examples of the kind of information Taylor may be able to provide about your image.

    Taylor will contact you by e-mail or phone if your submission is chosen for analysis. In that case, Family Tree Magazine may publish the picture and Taylor's professional analysis containing your name and the names of any relevant deceased ancestors on this blog or in the magazine.

    Please note that by submitting your image, you grant Family Tree Magazine permission to use it in any and all print, online and promotional materials.

    How to submit photos by e-mail:
    Scan the picture in JPG format with a resolution of 300 dpi. If there are markings on the back, scan it as well. Send the images to Taylor as an e-mail attachment with the words Family Tree Magazine in the subject line. Include the following in the body of the message:
    • Your name and contact information. Taylor may need to ask you more questions about your picture.
    • Any information you have about the image, such as how it came into your possession, who you suspect is pictured and why, the location, etc.
    • Your specific question about the picture.
    How to submit photos by postal mail:
    Make a photographic copy of your image using a scanner or retail photo kiosk, or by visiting a photo services lab. Using a photocopier will result in a poor-quality image that can't be analzed. Copy the back, too, if it contains any markings. 

    Type a letter with the bulleted information above. Mail the letter and copied photo to Photo Detective, Family Tree Magazine, 10151 Carver Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242. DO NOT send your original photograph—photos will not be returned to you.

    Disclaimers:
    Many factors come into play in identifying historical photos; therefore, Family Tree Magazine can't guarantee the accuracy of an analysis. Not every submitted photo will be analyzed. Taylor is unable provide individuals with free private analyses; however, if you are interested in her professional photo services, please visit her Photo Detective Web site


    photo news
    Sunday, June 01, 2008 8:41:17 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Friday, April 18, 2008
    New Discovery in Photo History
    Posted by Maureen

    This story is so good I couldn't wait until next week to blog about it. The April 17 New York Times ran a story, "An Image is a Mystery for Photo Detectives." This is one mystery I wish I was actively working on.

    Turns out William Fox Talbot probably wasn't the first person to develop paper images.

    There was a circle of friends in England who tinkered with photographic processes as early as the 1790s. While the news doesn't change when daguerreotypes were patented (1839), this tale of photo detecting focuses on a series of clues relating to who took the images of leaves the New York Times reports on. 

    I've written about provenance, i.e. the trail of ownership of an heirloom or photo, and in this one case it's key. Photo historians attributed these leaf pictures to Talbot, but now a historian familiar with his work doesn't believe that to be true. It's like a Pandora's Box of photo history. If this one picture isn't Talbots, then likely several others aren't attributed properly, too.

    It's a great tale. Sotheby's is going to auction some of these pieces, but right now photo scholars are trying to figure out the true photographer.


    photo news
    Friday, April 18, 2008 4:33:32 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [1]
    # Tuesday, March 18, 2008
    Polaroid Preservation
    Posted by Diane

    Two weeks ago I wrote about how Polaroid stopped manufacturing film. In the Comments section to that article, Nancy Owen asked, "Over the years, I've taken a lot of Polaroid pictures. Many of them are not holding up. The edges of the paper on the back are coming unglued. What can I do to preserve my photographs?"

    Ahh, Nancy, Polaroid pictures are a bit troublesome. If you've taken these instant pictures and haven't looked at them in a while, it's time to take a peek. These images have a tendency to fade, crack and become unglued. 

    The best solution is to scan them, then fix the damage using photo editing software.

    Several people wrote to me privately saying how much they liked using their Polaroid cameras. According to an article in Sunday's Boston Globe, Fuji still makes instant film. You can see a selection of their products on the Fuji Web site. And yes, it works in Polaroid cameras!


    photo news | preserving photos
    Tuesday, March 18, 2008 3:44:53 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Tuesday, March 04, 2008
    Polaroid News
    Posted by Maureen

    Another photographic giant is shutting down production on one of its products. In mid-February, Polaroid announced that after this year, it will no longer manufacture film for its cameras. You can listen to the National Public Radio interview live on the web.

    Edwin H. Land established the company back in 1937. It offered photographers instant gratification: Take a picture, wait a few minutes and you could see your picture. Now digital has replaced the days of watching the print develop in front of your eyes. Follow the ups and downs of this trend-setting company on Wikipedia.

    I guess my husband and I will retire all our Polaroid cameras. My first one was called the "Swinger" because it had a strap to hang from your wrist. It was a lot of fun to use.

    Got a question about your Polaroid pictures, submit them to me at mtaylor@taylorandstrong.com or ask them in the comment field below.


    photo news
    Tuesday, March 04, 2008 3:52:24 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [1]