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by Maureen A. Taylor

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# Sunday, March 29, 2015
Facial Features as a Old Photo Identification Clue
Posted by Maureen

Who do you look like?  I'm my father's child from the nose up and my mother's child from the nose down.  Often looking at family photographs will trigger a familiar response: "ah, that's where I got that nose or those blue eyes." 

Using facial features to identify family photographs is often a difficult assignment. It's all about adding up the evidence and then comparing the images. Eyes, noses, mouths and ears as well as the spacing between them can be one key clue.  There are more than twenty points in a face worth comparing.

Richard Rainsberger owns this picture of Amanda Lash Newhouse (1862-1945).


The photographer Rief first opened his studio in Canton, Ohio in 1902.  These types of photo mounts were quite common in the early twentieth century.  She wears a lovely printed cotton blouse with a high neckline, a style popular in the first decade of the twentieth century.

Recently a cousin gave him an unidentified photo of a young woman.


Amanda had one daughter, Zelma (b. 1884). Could this be her?
 Let's look at the faces more closely.

Using Pixlr.com I created a collage of two close-ups of their faces.  What resemblances do you see?




We inherit qualities from both our mothers and our fathers (and our ancestors).  I see a similar smile and nose on these two women, but do the facts add up?

The unidentified woman posed for a picture likely in her late teens or early twenties.  The yoked bodice and high collar suggest it was taken in the first decade of the twentieth century, just like the photo of Amanda Newhouse.

Newhouse's daughter was born in 1884.  Add twenty years to that birth date and you get 1904, a likely date for the photo.

There is no photographer mentioned on the unidentified image.

I'm not sure how Richard and his cousin Rob are cousins. That last bit of information would identify the provenance of the picture.  Who owned it before Rob and what other photographs was it passed down with?  I can't wait to find out.

This could be a picture of Zelma.  A fact that would make two genealogists very happy.

Here are the two images side by side.







Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1900-1910 photos | women
    Sunday, March 29, 2015 3:19:49 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 23, 2015
    Using Women's Collars to Date Old Family Photos
    Posted by Maureen

    The last two images blog reader Kimble DaCosta sent me are from the same period, but show off two different collar styles: one from the mid- to late 1870s and the other from the late 1870s to early 1880s. Both photos are tintypes.

    You can read the first two installments of DaCosta's photo story: Adding Up the Clues to Identify an Old Mystery Photo and Tips to Trace the Lineage of Your Photos.

    Here are this week's two images:

     
    1876-1878



    1879-1882

    The collar clues help determine the time period.


    Every year brought many fashion choices. Women were inventive when adapting their current clothing to fit the trends. When dating clothing in old photos, it's important to watch for the details and to add up all the clothing clues. 

    In the first photo, the dress features a high neckline with a scarf tied around the neck. This was common during the late 1870s. The long bodice, called a polonaise, is paired with a shirred skirt.

    We can't see the skirt in the second image, but the woman wears a lovely ruffled tubular collar, common in the early 1880s. Her fitted bodice features a single line of center buttons. Her skirt would've had some trim as well.

    Another type of collar popular in the early 1880s was called a fichu. It was usually lace and extended to the shoulders.

    Both women in these photos are young, likely in their late teens or early 20s.  These ages and the date ranges for the photos give DaCosta a starting point to search her family tree for possible identities.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1870s photos | 1880s photos | women
    Monday, March 23, 2015 6:15:22 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, March 15, 2015
    Adding up the Clues to Identify an Old Mystery Photo
    Posted by Maureen

    Last week I wrote about the importance of knowing the lineage of your photos. The key details of provenance can keep you from making a photo identification mistake.



    Kimble DaCosta knows a lot about the photos she inherited. Her ancestor Ella Seamands identified most of the images in a chest that Kimble inherited, but there were a few that she didn't name. 

    In this picture, both the woman and the man look uncomfortable in front of the camera. Their discomfort could be due to the reason they posed for the picture or because sitting for a photograph was an unusual event in their lives.

    When identifying the photographic method used to create a 19th-century print, examine clues such as cardstock and the hue of the print. Trained photographic conservators use a microscope at 30X magnification will reveal in detail what an original print looks like at the fiber level. They also look at the surface character of the photo by viewing it flat at eye level.

    The purplish hue of this print suggests it could be either a gelatin or collodion printing-out paper, first available in 1885 and in use until 1920. 

    The clothing clues in this image date it to the late 1890s, when flat, pie plate-shaped hats with high trim were common. All the lace trim on this woman's hat suggests it was meant to be worn in summer. 

    This young woman wears fingerless gloves and carries an umbrella and a fan. While the gloves and hat are likely part of her wardrobe, I wonder if the photographer has supplied the umbrella and fan. She looks awkward holding them. 

    Let's say this picture was taken about 1897, and the man and woman are close to 20 years of age. This is a hypothesis that could help Kimble find the right people in her family tree. They would've been born in the late 1870s, with a little wiggle room on either side of the date.   

    I'm hoping this information leads to an identification. Next week I'll look at two of her other images.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1890s photos | hats
    Sunday, March 15, 2015 2:34:45 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, March 08, 2015
    Tips to Trace the Lineage of Your Photos
    Posted by Maureen



    Tracing the line of descent of your family is more than putting names and dates on your family tree.

    You can use those same genealogical techniques to trace the history of ownership—the provenance—of your pictures.  

    Knowing how a group of pictures came to be in your collection can prevent an identification mistake. You might assume that those cute photos came from your paternal grandfather's family, when in fact, they were once owned by your paternal grandmother's family. 

    Different collections of photos often get lumped together by well-meaning relatives. Studying clues such as photographer's imprints with locations or facial resemblances can help you sort out who's who. And if a relative gives you a box of pictures, ask how the photos came into that person's possession. 

    Kimble DaCosta has 300 pictures an uncle sent her. She'd only met him twice, but he'd heard she was interested in genealogy, so he sent her a chest that once belonged to her great-grandmother Ella Francis (Seamands) Friend (1863-1936).

    DaCosta knows a lot about who owned those pictures: Ella was the daughter of John Seamands (1834-1888) and Evalina Brown (1842-1911). She married Hanson Lincoln Friend (1860-1937). Ella had identified most of the pictures, but a few mysteries remained.

    When Ella died, the chest became the possession of Kimble's grandmother, Mabel Clair (Friend) Martin (1892-1871), who was married to Harry S. Martin (1892-1971). Both Ella and Mabel placed photographs and letters in the chest. Most of the photos were from the Friend and Seamands families, but some were from her Harry S. Martin's family as well.

    With so many identified images, Kimble already knows what family characteristics match different branches. Now that she knows the names of the families represented in the collection, the next step is to date and identify the last remaining images. Above is one of her mystery images that I'll write about next week.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • summer | women
    Sunday, March 08, 2015 8:26:02 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, March 02, 2015
    Photo Jewelry
    Posted by Maureen

    Last week I showed you a picture of a piece of photo jewelry owned by Teri Luna and discussed a few clues. 


    Teri saw the column and wrote back with a few more details.

    This particular pin is 1 3/4 inches high and 1 3/8 inches wide.  In the photo it looks larger than that.  These small pins could be worn at the neckline or pinned to the bodice. 

    I suggested that this man could be either the father of John Waddell Brown or the father of his wife, Agnes Dunlop Drinnan Brown if either man was born circa 1810.

    Teri doesn't know too much about either man. Both were deceased at the time Agnes and John married in 1892. John's father, John Brown was a carting contractor but Teri lacks both birth and death information for him.  It's a classic case of genealogical research problems relating to a common name. His wife was Janet Waddell.

    Agnes' father, John Dunlop had a civic occupation as the Registrar of Births. He was born circa 1818 in Tarbolton, Ayrshire, Scotland.  His wife was Catherine Fulton Dunlop.

    Both mother's were alive at the time their children married. The mystery remains. Who's depicted in the photo and who wore the pin? Janet or Catherine?

    Teri's determined to figure out this mystery. She's going through microfiche of town records looking for clues. She might want to consult FindMyPast.com too.  I found several possible matches for her ancestors including census records for the Dunlops.  Find My Past offers a free 14-day trial subscription.

    She's happy to know more about the pin and said, "We will treasure it forever."



    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices

  • 1850s photos | photo jewelry | Web sites
    Monday, March 02, 2015 5:23:26 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, February 22, 2015
    Identifying Old Photos in Lockets and Brooches
    Posted by Maureen

    Teri Luna's grandmother Catherine Walker Brown Robson owned two pieces of photo jewelry. 

    Her locket contained two photos, one of Catherine and the other of her sister Jean. When Teri removed them, two other images fell out that had been stored behind the other pictures. One was Catherine's husband, William, when he was young, and the other was her brother George Andrew Drinnan in his WWI military uniform.

    The other photo jewelry, a pin or brooch, presents a mystery. Teri's not sure who's in this portrait: 



    Catherine was born in Dalziel, Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1894, and immigrated to Canada with her mother, Agnes Dunlop Drinnan Brown. Teri is hoping that this picture shows Catherine's father, John Waddell Brown.  Brown was born about 1855 in Fintry, Stirlingshire, Scotland.

    People wore pins like this in both the United States and Scotland. But the pin dates to earlier than Teri thinks. Pins of similar design date from the 1850s to the early 1860s.

    Based on the man's tie and lapels, I'd date this photo to the early 1860s.  His under-the-chin beard connected to sideburns also was common during that period. In the United States, this type of beard was called a Greeley after newspaperman Horace Greeley.

    Because Brown's great-grandfather wasn't born until 1855, this man isn't him. This man is middle aged, with gray throughout his facial hair.  

    So who could he be? He could be Agnes Dunlop Drinnan Brown's father, or the father of her husband, John Waddell Brown. I'd need more information on their birth places and years to double-check the data against the photo evidence.

    If this image was taken in, say, 1863, and the man was in his 50s (let's estimate 53), then this man was born about 1810. This suggested birth year might help identify him in the family tree.

    The best resource for researching photo jewelry, such as lockets, charms, pins and brooches, is Tokens of Affection and Regard (2005) by Larry J. West and Patricia Abbott. Teri's family is lucky to have this gorgeous pin.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • photo jewelry
    Sunday, February 22, 2015 7:29:49 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, February 16, 2015
    Old-Time Baby Pictures
    Posted by Maureen

    Social media today is full of pictures of children and grandchildren, but posting historical, black-and-white baby pictures hasn't really caught on yet.

    Babies born 100 years ago are just as cute as the darlings posted today.  Take this image for instance: Maria Baker submitted it and wants to know more about it. 



    She found it in her grandmother's things. Maria owns pictures of her grandmother (b. 1901) as a baby, and she knows this isn't her.

    In the late 1890s, it was common to pose children on animal skins like the one depicted here. The wide yoke on the dress suggests that it was taken circa 1900 (either a few years earlier or later). This child is likely belted around the waist to hold him or her in the wicker posing chair.

    The gender of the child isn't clear. Boys wore dresses until they started to become mobile. If this isn't Maria's grandmother, could it be one of her siblings or a picture of her husband? 

    If you look at an image taken overseas, the same basic information of photographer's name and location appears on the card photographs just like the ones taken in the United States. Wien stands for Vienna. Maria knows that her grandmother's family lived in that area. Etzelsdorfer is the name of the photographer.

    I hope having a date for the image helps her identify this adorable baby. I'd estimate the child is between 6 months to 1 year old.  From the warm hat on its head to the expression on the baby's face, this picture is a treasure.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1900-1910 photos | children
    Monday, February 16, 2015 8:32:38 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Monday, February 09, 2015
    RootsTech 2015
    Posted by Maureen

    Four years. That's how long it's taken for RootsTech to change the way we view genealogy conferences. In those few years, RootsTech has become the largest genealogical conference in the country. Last year, more than 7,000 people attended; this year's expected crowd may double that number in part because the organizers partnered with the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS). The FGS conference will be held in conjunction with RootsTech, with separate class sessions but a shared exhibit hall and keynote speakers. Register for either conference and you can purcahse an add-on pass to attend sessions for the other. 

    If you can't attend, look for details (still to come) about the live streaming part of the conference, or watch last year's speakers. Their videos are online.

    I was there in 2011 and 2013, and I'll be there this year.  The reasons it's so popular are simple:

    1.Location. It's in Salt Lake City, Utah, which is home to the largest genealogical research library—FamilySearch's Family History Library

    2.Dynamic programs. Speakers from all over the world present new material at this conference. Each and every lecture is fresh.  This year I'm presenting a total of five at the joint FGS/RootsTech conference.

    3. Excitement. There's a buzz about RootsTech that's hard to miss. From early morning, big name keynote lectures to blockbuster evening entertainment, the conference goes from dawn to bedtime.

    I'll be in booth 1240, nearby Family Tree Magazine, Genealogy Gems and Family Chartmasters. Stop by to say hello, listen to one of our free Outside the Box lectures, and enter our grand prize drawing.

    I love attending conference so that I can meet people and look at their photos.

    Two years ago at RootsTech, I met Pam and Art Crawford, who had a photo mystery that defied explanation:

     crawford2.jpg

    I've written a few installments on this mind-bending mystery.  In the second installment I tackled the costume clues in Mind-Bending Mystery Part 2.

    Last October, a woman came forward with additional images and solved part of the mystery. You can read about it in Mind Bending Mystery Revisited.

    One puzzle remains. How did Pam's family come to think that these folks were relatives? Read the columns and weigh in below by adding a comment.

    Can't wait to see new photos this year! 


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • Rootstech
    Monday, February 09, 2015 11:39:05 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]
    # Sunday, February 01, 2015
    Big Hats in Family Photos
    Posted by Maureen

    Ronnie O'Rourke's great aunt Mary (Mamie) Smith (b. 1892) wears an enormous hat in this family portrait. Her grandson identified her in the image, but now the family wants to know who's standing with her.


    Her hat and dress are quite stylish for this outdoor event. The presence of the mandolin suggests that this group was likely singing and maybe dancing along with the tunes played by the family musician.

    Ronnie specifically wants to know if the man standing next to Mamie is her father, John Smith (b. 1865).  The family knows he died somewhere between 1905 and 1920, but they can't find the death record. It's the curse of the common name. She's been trying to narrow down just which John Smith is her relative.

    She wonders if Mamie's cousins, the Nevins siblings Frank (b. 1887), Catherine (b. 1888), Thomas (b. 1892) and Louise (b. 1897) are in the photo.  

    Each photo generates a series of questions. In this case, I'd love to know:
    • Why Mamie is visiting her cousins?
    • Are they all cousins, or did she have siblings?
    • Where was it taken?
    • Who took the picture?  It's a snapshot and someone owned an amateur camera, but who?  There could be other candid shots taken on the same day. 
    • Could the man be the father of the other people in the picture?

    Ronnie wonders about that gorgeous hat. Turns out that Louise was a milliner and it's possible she made it.

    The hat offers a few clues as to when the image was taken.

    In the circa 1910 period large turban style hats became fashionable. French fashion magazines like the Journal Des Demoiselles. Click here to see a fashion plate from 1909. You'll see some similarities between these hats and the one worn by Mamie.


    Fashion savvy Americans knew what the current styles were overseas. Here's the 1909 Spring Sears Catalog showing similar turban shaped hats.



    By 1913, smaller hats were in vogue. The hat is one clue that suggests a time frame. 

    Is it Mamie's father?  Perhaps.  If so, then he was still living after 1905.

    Love looking at hats, check out the styles worn in the nineteenth century in Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats, 1840-1900.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1900-1910 photos | hats | summer | women
    Sunday, February 01, 2015 3:34:27 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [2]
    # Monday, January 26, 2015
    Civil War Photo Clues Revisited
    Posted by Maureen

    Last week's mystery photo featured a mother and daughter. Winston Cochrane owns the image and wanted to know if it depicts the daughter's wedding.



    I tentatively dated the image to circa 1868 until more details became available. The back of a card photo can reveal other facts. The presence of a revenue stamp indicates a specific time frame of Aug. 1, 1864, to Aug. 1, 1866. A photographer's name and address can be researched in city directories, census records and online. A caption can confirm or refute the supposed identity of the sitter.

    Here's the back of this image:



    A quick search of the Louisville City Directories on Ancestry.com confirms Winston's details about the photographer. Samuel Jennings operated a studio from circa 1864 to 1866.

    He ran an advertisement in the 1864 Louisville Directory on page 132:



    Kentucky was a border state during the war and eventually sided with the Union. The lack of a revenue stamp on this image is puzzling. Jennings was in business throughout the years when those tax stamps were used, so the image was taken prior to August 1864 or after August 1866.

    A comment on last week's post suggested a circa 1865 date based on the width of the hoop and the style of the sleeve. The frogging on the bodice also was popular during the Civil War. 

    The lack of the stamp suggests it was taken after August 1866. If Mary Meaux and daughter Nannie posed in late 1866, then the daughter would be 17. 

    A date for this image answers Winston's question about whether it was taken at her wedding in 1870.

    You can learn more about Civil War photographs in my book, Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album.


    Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

  • Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries
  • Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900
  • Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album
  • Hairstyles 1840-1900
  • Photo-Organizing Practices
  • Preserving Your Family Photographs
  • Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now


  • 1860s photos | Civil War | women
    Monday, January 26, 2015 3:22:56 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #  Comments [0]