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# Wednesday, October 22, 2008
Finding Ancestors in the Civilian Conservation Corps
Posted by Diane

Q. My relative worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. Where can I find more information about his time there?

A. This question was inspired by a post in our Forum.

The CCC—which happens to be celebrating its 75th anniversary this year—was established March 21, 1933, as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal legislation. By the time the CCC disbanded in 1942, when Congress ceased its funding, more than 2.5 million workers had participated.

It was a multi-agency effort, with the Army running CCC camps and various federal agencies sponsoring them.

Over 4,500 camps were established in all states. African-Americans were segregated in “colored” camps. Each enrollee earned at least $30 per month, and had to send $25 of it home to family.

It’ll help your search if you know your ancestor’s camp and the dates he worked, so ask your family members and pore over your research for clues.

The Colorado state archives has a statewide CCC enrollment index, which gives the enrollee’s name, county, birth date and camp.

Employment records of CCC workers are in the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. You can fill out a research request following these instructions. Provide as much information as possible, and send either a written OK from the person in the record or proof of the person's death.

Most administrative and other records—project reports, correspondence, the CCC’s Happy Days weekly newspaper, publicity materials, meeting minutes, photographs, accident and death reports—are part of Record Group 35 at NARA’s College Park, MD, facility.

Records of the separate Indian Division of the CCC are with Bureau of Indian Affairs records in NARA’s Seattle and Denver regional facilities.

The CCC records aren’t indexed and few are microfilmed, so you’d need to travel to NARA or hire a researcher there to use them. The finding aid Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Civilian Conservation Corps by Douglas Helms should help.

Some of the camps had newspapers, you can learn their titles using the Center for Research Libraries online search.

Learn more about the CCC on these sites:


occupational records | US roots
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 8:38:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [3]
# Thursday, October 09, 2008
Searching for Y-DNA Matches in Other Companies' Databases
Posted by Diane

Q. I took a 46-marker Y-DNA test through Ancestry.com's DNA testing service. Can I post my test results on other organizations' DNA Web sites to search for matches?

A. Most genetic genealogy companies that host public DNA databases will let you enter results from other companies.

It’s a little more complicated than it sounds, though, because labs don’t always test the same markers, and they might present test results differently.

That means you might have to convert your marker values to the format used by the database you want to search. DNA database sites usually have information to help you with this process.

Family Tree DNA’s Ysearch database, for example, has a page to help you enter marker values from other companies. Depending on the company used, you select a marker submission form (Ancestry.com acquired Relative Genetics, so you'd use the Relative Genetics form). Look for red asterisks next to the labels for marker values you’ll need to convert; conversion instructions also are provided.

Ybase’s results submission form also has asterisks that link to a Conversion page.

See our list of these and other public DNA databases, as well as other genetic genealogy reearch helps, in our online DNA toolkit.


genetic genealogy
Thursday, October 09, 2008 3:47:19 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #  Comments [0]