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# Tuesday, 18 July 2017
Five Ways to Have the Best-Ever Virtual Genealogy Conference!
Posted by Diane

Can you believe how fast summer is sailing by? Which means the Family Tree University Virtual Genealogy Conference is right around the corner, Sept. 13 to 15.

This online event has the excitement and shared knowledge of a genealogy conference, without the expense and difficulty of travel and being away from family and work. Or the pressure to change out of your fuzzy slippers.


Wikimedia commons, Ch2410

You get a weekend of video classes (which you can download to keep), networking with genealogy researchers and experts via our conference message boards, and a live keynote. Classes and Q&A sessions cover genetic genealogy, websites, methodology, organizing and preserving your research, and ethnic research.

I hope you'll join me there. Use coupon code FALLVCEARLY to save $40 on registration! (Code expires Aug. 11, 2017.)

As a seasoned Virtual Conference attendee, I've got a few tips for making the most of the experience:

1. Peruse the program ahead of time.
Most of the conference is on-demand—you log in to watch videos and post to the message board any time during the conference. But Lisa Louise Cooke's keynote presentation on Sunday, "Big Pictures in Little Details," is live, as are the expert Q&A sessions on the message boards. Mark the scheduled bits on your calendar (remember the Virtual Conference is on East Coast Time).

Since you can download the classes to watch again, don't worry if you can't squeeze them all into the weekend. But do try to watch the ones most related to your research during the conference so you can discuss them on the message boards.

2. Free up some time.
The time-saving convenience of attending from home is a MAJOR draw. But carve out some time over the weekend to watch the videos and chat on the message boards. The Virtual Conference genealogy inspiration gets me excited about trying new strategies and resources, so I usually want to spend some time researching, too.

I minimize errands that weekend, and declare a pizza night for the kids. Daddy does something fun with them and we grant them more screen time. Therefore, my children enjoy the Virtual Conference almost as much as I do!

3. Log in on Friday.
Even if you're not planning on doing much conferencing on Friday, take 15 minutes to log in, go over the orientation and click around the conference. Make sure you can download a video. If you have any problems accessing the conference content, just post to the Technical Issues board and we'll address it as quickly as possible.

4. Play along.
You'll get the most benefit out of the classes and opportunities to interact with others if your research is fresh in your mind. Go over your tree before the conference to refamiliarize yourself with difficult ancestors. Make a list of your surnames and places for the surnames message board.

A lot of action happens on those boards! Introductions are made, tips shared, questions answered, brick walls solved, books and websites recommended. We'll even exchange recipes and family stories. Check here often during the conference, post your questions, and answer other peoples'.

5. Get comfy.
Everyone talks about how great it is to do genealogy in your pajamas. NOW'S YOUR CHANCE!! Wear your comfiest PJs and fuzziest slippers. Don't bother doing your hair. Make some coffee or tea, fetch your favorite snack and pad over to your computer. Revel in it.

Visit FamilyTreeUniversity.com to check out the conference details and sign up today. Remember to save $40 (before Aug. 11) with coupon code FALLVCEARLY!


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Family Tree University | Genealogy Events | Research Tips
Tuesday, 18 July 2017 09:54:01 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, 11 July 2017
How I Created a Genealogy Timeline To Show My Grandfather's Life
Posted by Diane

My grandfather Joe moved around a lot during his lifetime: Texas, North Carolina, Louisiana, Mississippi, back to Texas, elsewhere in Texas, Ohio, more places in Texas, various Ohio cities, South Dakota, Ohio again. 

Timelines organize an ancestor's or a family's family tree data—dates, places of residence, jobs, historical events, children's births—in an orderly fashion. I love them.

So when I was making a photo book about my grandfather as a Christmas present for my dad, I thought a timeline was just the thing to help summarize all those migrations. Matching up the timeline with a map of all the places would be even better.

My Grandfather's Migration Timeline
Here's the timeline and map I came up with:



The right-hand page lists each place Joe lived, with dates and details about what he did in that place. The information comes from my research in censuses, city directories, newspapers and other genealogy records. I'm lucky to have copies of a job application my grandpa filled out with his work history.



Looking at it now, I can see some things I'd change. But overall, I'm pleased with it.

For the map, I first tried customizing a Google map using free numbered place markers downloaded from here (Google's marker options don't include numbers). To create your own Google maps timeline, add a generic place marker to the map, click the paint can to edit the marker style, choose More Icons, then Custom Icon, and select the marker image file from your computer. You'll need a Google account to save the map.

I didn't love the result for my photo book, though, so I imported a map image into desktop publishing software I have access to through work, and added numbered place markers I created myself. Then I exported the file as a JPG to use in the photo book. 



I know a few tricks, but I'm not a graphic designer, so there's probably an easier and more artful way to go about making the map.

Using Timelines in Your Genealogy Research
Timelines are among your best genealogy tools. In addition to helping you easily share genealogical information, they let you: 
  • get an overview of a person or family in historical context

  • sort out a confusing jumble of information you've found in records

  • spot problems (why was Great-grandpa here and Great-grandma over there?)

  • note periods of missing information

  • brainstorm answers to research questions, such as why a relative immigrated or where your great-grandparents met
Our new independent study online course Using Timelines in Your Genealogy helps you take advantage of all these genealogy benefits of timelines.

It'll show you how to use timelines to understand your ancestors' lives and solve research problems, and how to create a timeline by hand or using websites such as Twile and Treelines. Best of all, you can take this independent study course at your own pace and download the videos and research guides to keep.

See all the details for our Using Timelines in Your Genealogy course and register at FamilyTreeUniversity.com.

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Family Tree University | Maps | Research Tips
Tuesday, 11 July 2017 12:43:10 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Wednesday, 05 July 2017
Cemetery Superstitions, Little-Known Facts and Genealogy Secrets
Posted by Diane

Do you love everything about cemeteries—finding family burial places, studying the old stones with their intricate designs, taking in the peaceful landscape, discovering old records in the cemetery office?

Then you'll love our new book, The Family Tree Cemetery Field Guide, coming in September from Family Tree Books. 



In the Cemetery Field Guide, veteran genealogist, blogger at A Grave Interest, and self-described "tombstone tourist" Joy Neighbors introduces you to different types of cemeteries and helps you find your ancestors' burial sites, understand tombstone symbolism, and uncover cemetery records you didn't realize existed.

Get to know to Joy and find out about her fascination with cemeteries with our Q&A:

Me: What turned you into a tombstone tourist?

Joy: It all began with a picnic. I was on a date with a guy (who later became my husband) who took me to a cemetery with a hamper of great food and a bottle of wine. He spread out a blanket near the lake and we talked about our lives, our views on life and death, and our interest in art, and somewhere in there, I forgot I was in a cemetery. I was just sitting outdoors having an amazing evening.

We married two years later and we’ve been visiting cemeteries ever since.

It was more than 25 years later when I decided to write A Grave Interest and share this forgotten history and art.


Joy Neighbors

Me: How many cemeteries have you've visited during your lifetime?

Joy: I’ve visited everything from huge city cemeteries to a cemetery located in the middle of a highway. Brian (my husband) is on the lookout for cemeteries when we travel. We spot one from the highway and we’ll detour off. Every cemetery is different but they are all worth a visit because you never know what finds are waiting.

Let’s just say I’ve been to thousands of cemeteries, but I’m always looking for the next one to visit.

Me: When I was young, my sisters and I would hold our breath when driving by a cemetery in Mom or Dad's car. What strange cemetery superstition have you encountered?

Joy:As a child, I was told not to count the cars in the funeral procession or your funeral would be the next one to drive by. I was a kid who counted everything: steps, train cars, clouds, so that was tough. 

There are so many superstitions about death and burial. Here are just a few that I’ve come across:
  • Never point at the funeral procession, it will bring bad luck.
  • If it rains in an open grave, it brings bad luck to the family.
  • Flowers and grass grow on the graves of those who have lived virtuous lives. Only weeds or mud will cover the grave of someone who was evil.
  • Never whistle in a graveyard, you are summoning the Devil.
  • Never take anything from a cemetery; the dead may follow you to get it back.
  • If there is thunder following a burial, the deceased has reached heaven.

Me: What's your favorite cemetery (and why)?

Joy:It’s so difficult to choose. If I narrowed it down by size, my favorite large cemetery is Cave Hill in Louisville, Ky. The artwork there is phenomenal and the history is amazing. It’s an older cemetery that has maintained a modern edge with its monuments, sculpture and stained glass. Plus, it’s very haunted. (And yes, I have stories from visiting.) 

For a medium sized cemetery, I’m torn between Highland Lawn in Terre Haute, Ind., and Oak Hill in Evansville, Ind. Highland Lawn has great symbolism on the stones, mausoleums, and a wealth of history. Most of the town’s historical figures are buried there. (It's haunted, too.) Oak Hill has tons of tree stones (my favorite), and rolling vistas with huge oak trees. The Civil War burial ground is one of the best designs I’ve seen.

I love small cemeteries because they're so intimate. You really have time to get to know who’s buried there, and I like to read the stones and wonder what life was like.

Me: Could you share something surprising about cemeteries that you've found most people don't know?

Joy:A cemetery is one of the most exquisite (and inexpensive) places to hold a wedding. The grounds are beautifully landscaped and manicured, and covered with sculpture, architecture, stained glass and other art. It is truly like getting married in an outdoor art museum.

If the cemetery has a chapel, there’s also the advantage of having an indoor wedding option. Cemeteries are just starting to embrace this idea, so if it’s something you’d like to do, don’t be afraid to approach them. 

Me: If readers remember one piece of advice from The Family Tree Cemetery Field Guide, what do you want it to be?

Joy:Never stop digging! I loved Nancy Drew mysteries when I was a girl, and that’s how I approach cemetery research. It’s all a mystery; I just have to figure out how to find the clues. And those clues could be hidden in records, family Bibles, photographs, or symbols on stones. Even the people themselves may hold the answers—or the clues.

I hope that the Cemetery Field Guide inspires others to become Tombstone Tourists and enjoy all the history and art that our cemeteries have to offer.

Me: You wrote on your blog that cemetery research led you to a family secret of monumental proportions. You explain everything in the Cemetery Field Guide, but can you give us a hint about what you discovered?

Me again: I'm gonna make you wait for this answer—and to hear about Joy's favorite tombstones of all of her cemetery visits. Stay tuned for more from Joy Neighbors! And of course you can find out more about The Family Tree Cemetery Field Guide and preorder it in ShopFamilyTree.com.

Cemeteries | Genealogy books

Wednesday, 05 July 2017 14:40:15 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, 28 June 2017
Why FamilySearch Is Ending Microfilm Rental & How to Get Genealogy Records Now
Posted by Diane

Guest blog post by Family Tree Magazine Contributing Editor Sunny Jane Morton



For 80 years, the FamilySearch Family History Library (FHL) has made its enormous stash of microfilmed genealogy records available to researchers through an inexpensive rental service through local FamilySearch Centers.

That's about to change: FamilySearch has announced that this service will end Aug. 31. Reasons include declining demand for film, dramatic increases in the costs of reproducing films, and the difficulty of supporting aging microfilm technology.

It’s easy to be dismayed by the news, even when you acknowledge it was bound to happen. Many of us have solved family history mysteries with these microfilmed records. 

Fortunately, most FamilySearch microfilm is already been digitized and posted on the free FamilySearch website or another genealogy site. That's more than 1.5 million rolls, including the most popular ones. “The remaining [eligible] microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020," according to the announcement. "All new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment."

I've been a grateful user of the film rental program. And the millions of records FamilySearch makes available online for free more than offset offsets this inconvenience to my research.

But after Aug. 31 and before 2020, what can we do about accessing records that aren't yet digitized? Try these seven ideas:

1. Keep using the FamilySearch online catalog of the FHL's books and microfilmed records.
You can order microfilm up through Aug. 31 (click here to see how); you'll get 90 days to view the film. When digitized films are posted at FamilySearch, the item's catalog entry links to the online collection. Even if you don’t find a borrowable item in the catalog, it's useful for identifying records you may be able to access elsewhere (see below). Here are our tips on searching the catalog.

2. Check other libraries.
If you find a noncirculating item described in the FamilySearch catalog, click the link to view the catalog record in WorldCat.



It'll take you to this item's listing in WorldCat, a free catalog of holdings in libraries around the world. You'll see libraries that have the item, and link to their lending policies. You may discover records in other formats, such as digitized, in a book or original manuscript records.

3. Search for digitized versions of the records.
Search the web for the names and descriptions of records you've identified in the FamilySearch catalog. You may find digitized versions at free sites such as HathiTrust, Internet Archive, state library websites, and others. Also search the database catalogs on genealogy websites such as Ancestry.com, MyHeritage and Findmypast.

4. Visit a genealogy library such as ...
5. Use library lookup and photocopy services.
Some libraries fill requests for lookups and photocopies for a fee. Check the website or call for instructions; usually, you must provide the book or microfilm title and specifics such as a name, date or page number. Firms offering research at the FHL include Genealogists.com.

6. Hire a researcher.
If you need someone to search through records—not just check an index or flip to the page you specify and copy it—consider hiring a researcher by the hour. Many libraries offer in-house research services, or they may supply a list of local researchers.

7. Find original records.
It might be easier to access original records, if they exist, than microfilmed versions. Start with the FamilySearch catalog listing. Look for the name of the repository that provided the original records (often under "Author"). Search that repository’s website to see if the records are still there. Another option is to search ArchiveGrid, a catalog of archival items in US repositories. Here's how to use ArchiveGrid.

FamilySearch's renewed focus on digital efforts means its free online genealogy resources will grow even faster. Watch ShopFamilyTree.com for my Aug. 21 webinar on the free FamilySearch website, in which I'll share my search tricks for getting the most out of this website.

Meanwhile, grab my must-have comparison of the "big three" commercial sites, Ancestry, Findmypast and MyHeritage. I'll help you decide which one's right for you.

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FamilySearch | Libraries and Archives | Research Tips
Wednesday, 28 June 2017 10:50:13 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Friday, 23 June 2017
Ancestors in the CCC? Search Online Camp Newspapers from Virginia!
Posted by Diane

If your ancestor or other relative was part of the New Deal Civilian Conservation Corps program, camp newspapers are great for learning about his experience. And it's getting easier to access CCC camp newspapers from Virginia (plus a few from outside Virginia).


CCC workers, Library of Congress

The Virginia Newspapers Project has announced that CCC camp newspapers from the Library of Virginia's collection, published from 1934 to 1941 by young men participating in the CCC, are being digitized on the Virginia Chronicle newspaper website. The papers were originally microfilmed by the Center for Research Libraries in 1991.



The Camp Victory Crier, for example, was published in Yorktown, Va. Page two of this issue names staff including editor in chief Oliver J. Wilson, other editors, press men and reporters.

Click here to browse the CCC newspapers already on Virginia Chronicle. To search these and other newspapers on the site, use the keyword search box on the home page or the Advanced Search, which lets you specify a date range and newspaper title to search.

Here's a guide to the Library of Virginia's collection of CCC camp newspapers.

Looking for more CCC history websites and old records of CCC camps and workers? See our genealogy Q&A on how to research a CCC worker on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.

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Newspapers
Friday, 23 June 2017 09:03:10 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, 20 June 2017
Grants Are Now Available for Preserving WWI Memorials!
Posted by Diane


WWI Memorial in Jackson, Miss. (Library of Congress)

Here's a project for your history- and preservation-minded genealogical society, civic group or scouting troop: The 100 Cities/100 Memorials matching grant program is accepting applications through July 10 (an extended deadline) for projects to adopt and preserve WWI memorials.

Up to 100 WWI memorial restoration projects around the country will receive matching funds of up to $2,000 apiece from the US WWI Centennial Commission in Washington, DC, and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library in Chicago.

Any municipal government, organization or individual can apply. You'll find details and the application on the 100 Cities/100 Memorials website.

World War I, also known as the Great War, began in Europe just over 100 years ago, July 28, 1914. The United States entered the war April 6, 1917, and an armistice ended fighting Nov. 11, 1918. The July 2014 Family Tree Magazine includes a research guide to records of World War I service, as well as a guide to tracing women who served as nurses and volunteers overseas and on the home front.

Also find our downloadable guide to the top 10 WWI genealogy websites in ShopFamilyTree.com.


WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. (Library of Congress)
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Genealogy societies | Historic preservation
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 09:09:06 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, 16 June 2017
2017 Virtual Conference: Genealogy Technology and Tools
Posted by Diane

Guest post by Vanessa Wieland, Dean of Family Tree University

We have another amazing virtual conference in the works (September 15-17), with three days of genealogy search tips, tricks, techniques and tools you can use to improve your genealogy search. Our lineup is still being finalized, but we’re looking forward to presentations on the following tech-based tools, plus a presentation that will compare the four DNA testing companies so you can see which test is best for you.

Cloud Technology: Preservation and Organization - Jennifer Alford

Learn how to preserve your genealogy and organize it online with these tips. You'll learn about what tools will be most useful for keeping your work in great shape.

Time Travel Technology - Lisa Louise Cooke

Go back in time to discover your ancestors with these tech tools that will help you discover the details that will bring your ancestor's history to life.

Resources for Visual Storytelling - Nancy Hendrickson

If a picture paints a thousand words, this presentation will provide you with the know-how to create great tales using visual elements.

5 Google Secrets Revealed - Lisa Louise Cooke

Google is a great resource for researching your family history and heritage, especially when you've learned these handy research tricks.

Learn more about the 2017 Fall Virtual Conference and sign up early to get the early bird discount. Take $40 off the price with coupon code FALLVCEARLY.


Genealogy Software | Tech Advice
Friday, 16 June 2017 14:41:05 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Wednesday, 31 May 2017
How to Use the Library of Congress' New Sanborn Maps for Genealogy
Posted by Diane

Have you heard the news about the Library of Congress’ new digital Sanborn maps? Nearly 25,000 maps are now online, with more to be added over the next three years for a total of 500,000.

Sanborn fire insurance maps were published for insurance companies to assess a structure’s risk of catching fire. They were published in different years for different places, and usually after 1920, a set of maps for a particular town might be updated by pasting over a new building.

The maps show subdivision names, streets, buildings, and building details such as address, purpose, composition, windows and doors. You can locate your ancestor’s address before renumbering and renaming that might’ve happened, and you get a good look at your ancestor’s neighborhood at the time.

Here’s an example of how I used the collection to see where my ancestors lived:

1. Much of my mom's family lived in Covington, Ky., so that’s what I searched for (typing the full state name) in the Search box at the top of the page. Maps were published in 1886 and 1894.



I chose 1886.



2. Next, I looked up a few ancestors’ addresses in city directories. In 1886, Louis Thoss lived and worked at a hardware business at 73 E. 12th st. His mother, Elizabeth, was a widow at the southeast corner (“sec”) of 13th and Garrard. His deceased brother’s widow, Jennie, lived at 165 E. 13th.

3. Each set of maps took up many pages in a book. An index map, labeled Map 1, is the first in the series and shows which page covers each area.



Zoom in on the index map and drag it around to get a better look at street names.

For larger cities, check the last page in the series for a street index that lists which range of house numbers and the map page they’re located on. It also lists “specials,” or major buildings.

The corner of East 13th and Garrard is on Map 30. Jennie's address on East 13th could be on map 29 or 30.



I Googled Louis' address to get a better idea of its location today. It's probably on Map 20, but might be on a different map if houses have been renumbered since Louis’ day.

4. At the top right of the web page, switching from single image to gallery view and clicking Go gets me to the view of all map pages in this set, so I can find and click image 30.

Here's where it helps to check a Google map if you don't know the area. Thirteenth street was shown running north/south, because it was probably positioned horizontally on the page. But in real life, it runs east/west. If I didn't know that, I’d pick the wrong corner of 13th and Garrard. You can rotate the map using controls in the lower right corner.

Elizabeth Thoss lived at No. 133. No. 165 is 11 doors to the east.



5. Elizabeth’s home is mostly pink and some yellow, with numbers and Xes, and the notation “no opgs” on the side. You’ll find a key on the index map page and more information about the colors and symbols here, along with notes such as the area’s population and size of the fire department.

Colors indicate construction materials. Green indicated a high-risk building. The numbers tell how many stories. An X marks a door, and Xes on walls mark windows, with dots for windows on second or higher stories. An O is an iron chimney. Elizabeth’s building was mostly brick (pink) and 2-½ stories, with a 2-story wood (yellow) addition. The front section held a saloon (“sal”), with a dwelling (“Dwg”) in the rear.

6. You can download this map in several formats, all the way up to a TIF, using the Download menu at the lower left.

If you’re looking in New York City, you can use the New York Public Library’s Map Warper to view Sanborn and other old maps layered over modern maps. If not, you can upload your map to Google Earth and do an overlay there. Find a tutorial in the July/August 2015 issue of Family Tree Magazine.


Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives | Maps
Wednesday, 31 May 2017 20:58:11 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [5]
# Tuesday, 30 May 2017
MyHeritage DNA Releases New & Improved Ethnicity Estimate Reports
Posted by Diane

MyHeritage DNA today releases its new and improved Ethnicity Estimate reporting, which provides your percentages of origins from 42 ethnic regions around the world—more than what's available with other tests. 

These regions are based in part on MyHeritage's Founder Populations Project, which analyzed the DNA of 5,000 individuals whose MyHeritage family trees showed ancestry in the same areas for many generations.

Video results
Uniquely, the ethnicity estimate comes with a short, shareable video presentation enhanced by music that's based on the culture of the ethnicities represented. Here's an example provided by MyHeritage:

MyHeritage DNA’s new Ethnicity Estimate experience from MyHeritage on Vimeo.

42 world regions
But here's a more-important unique feature: According to its announcement, MyHeritage DNA estimates tease apart ethnicities that are grouped together in other companies' DNA tests. The 42 ethnicities include "Balkan, Baltic, Eskimo and Inuit, Japanese, Kenyan, Sierra Leonean, Somali, four major Jewish groups (Ethiopian, Yemenite, Sephardic from North Africa and Mizrahi from Iran and Iraq), Indigenous Amazonian, Papuan and many others."

MyHeritage, headquartered in Israel, is known for its international member base. It'll be interesting to see how my report looks: My Ancestry DNA test reported me at 28 percent Italy/Greece and 4 percent Middle Eastern. I have no known ancestry in Italy or Greece, but my great-grandparents were Lebanese.

Free for those who've uploaded results
The Ethnicity Estimate is free to users who have already uploaded their DNA data to MyHeritage from other services, or who upload it in the coming months. (This offer helps MyHeritage build its DNA results database, important when more-established competitors at Ancestry DNA, Family Tree DNA and 23andMe already have large databases.)

Another benefit of uploading is free DNA matching to others in the MyHeritage DNA database. Note that different companies test different locations on the autosomal DNA, and they "impute" (or estimate) the DNA values for locations that don't overlap with another company's test. MyHeritage takes the imputed values into account when making matches, so your match list will look different here than it does at the service where you tested.

MyHeritage Chief Science Officer Yaniv Erlich called the ethnicity reporting "an appetizer." "There are excellent installments on the way, and users can prepare for a feast! We have detailed plans to increase accuracy, extend our Founder Populations project further, and improve the resolution for ethnicities of great interest to our users from highly diverse origins."


Genetic Genealogy | MyHeritage
Tuesday, 30 May 2017 11:29:08 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, 23 May 2017
Three New Ways to Learn About Your Ancestor's Military Service
Posted by Diane

On Memorial Day, Americans traditionally place flowers on the graves of those who died in military service (read how this holiday, originally called Decoration Day began). Canadians observe Memorial Day on July 1. 


Library of Congress

Another way to honor your ancestors who served in the armed forces is to learn about their wartime experiences and preserve those stories by writing them down. If it was years ago when you last learned about the wars your ancestors served in, it might be time to give it another go—technology offers new ways to explore historic wars through maps, apps and videos.


Library of Congress

Maps
If you can learn the military unit and battles your relative served in (this military research guide can help), military maps let you trace his movements and even where he would've been during battles. The Library of Congress has a Military Battles and Campaigns map collection, which you can search by keyword using the search field at the top of the page. The one above is from a series showing the 12th Army Group from D-Day through July 26, 1945, in World War II.

The David Rumsey Map Collection has digitized military maps and military atlases you can search or browse using the filters on the left side of the page.

For the Civil War and American Revolution, explore the animated and historical maps at the Civil War Trust website. They include overviews of the entire war and for individual battles.

Apps
Your smart device can help you access military history information wherever you are. Try searching your device's app store for "military history," "[name of war] history" or "[name of battle] history." A few I found include:
  • Civil War Today ($2.99, iOS): This History Channel app shows you a daily newspaper article about the war.

  • Civil War Trust Battle Apps (free, iOS and Android): These let you virtually tour Civil War battlefields for major battles like Chancellorsville and Antietam, and they're good companions if you're visiting the battlefield. 

  • Military History (.99, iOS): This reference has 1,200 entries for  important military events; search by date and keyword. It also has a "this day in history" feature.

  • 20th Century Military Uniforms (about $4, iOS and Android): View uniforms used by various countries throughout the 20th century.
Videos
The Civil War Trust comes through again with educational videos from history experts, including a Civil War In4 series that delves into a topic in four minutes or less.

The National Archives' YouTube channel has playlists including WWI Films, Tuskeegee Airmen and D-Day. The Library of Congress has a YouTube playlist on the Spanish-American War. YouTube also has videos from Ken Burns' documentaries about the Civil War and World War II.

And here's the only known Allied color footage from World War II.

More Genealogy Resources for Military Ancestors
Find websites for researching your ancestors who served in the US Armed Forces in this list of websites and get research tips in our free podcast on military records

In ShopFamilyTree.com, check out our downloadable, complete guides to research in military service records and military pension records.


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Maps | Military records
Tuesday, 23 May 2017 12:44:23 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [3]