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# Monday, 25 April 2016
Genealogy Roadshow Debuts May 17 (PLUS: Submit a Family Mystery for Next Season!)
Posted by Diane

"Genealogy Roadshow" has released a preview of its new season, premiering Tuesday, May 17, 8 p.m. ET on PBS. Shows this season will take place in Boston, Miami, Houston and Los Angeles.

If you haven't seen this series, it has professional genealogists D. Joshua Taylor, Kenyatta Berry and Mary Tedesco use research to solve family history mysteries for ordinary people. Often, the guests have done a little genealogy themselves and run across a family legend or difficult research problem.

(PS: Josh Taylor will present our Best New England Genealogy Research Strategies webinar this Thursday, April 28. Got ancestors from Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut or Rhode Island? Find out more here about this terrific opportunity to learn from an expert.)

Here's a preview of this season of "Genealogy Roadshow":


The show's website also is beefed up with genealogy tips and clips from past episodes. Many featuring background on historical events and people in guests' trees, such as Laura Ingalls Wilder, the US Colored Troops, and pirates and outlaws.

"Genealogy Roadshow" guests are selected through an application process—here's the online form for next season.


Genealogy TV | Webinars
Monday, 25 April 2016 10:31:57 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, 11 April 2016
My No. 1 Favorite Genealogy Resource
Posted by Diane

Newspapers! It's newspapers. They're full of details you don't find anywhere else (although sometimes colored by a reporter's perspective). Because our Find Your Ancestors in Online Newspapers webinar is coming up April 21,  I'll let my third-great-grandfather Thomas Frost demonstrate  why I love this resource.

You first heard about Thomas when I blogged about his sensational divorce (a Cincinnati Daily Enquirer newspaper article provided the clue to look for divorce records). On Nov. 19, 1879, two papers detailed the charges, although with different sympathies:





The Cincinnati Daily Enquirer article is at the top and the Cincinnati Daily Star article is below it.

Thomas' life didn't improve from there.

The Daily Enquirer reported March 8, 1881, on his visit with the children in an article titled "A Frosty Day." Mary was  supposed to make herself scarce before he arrived, but instead she hid in the house. She jumped out when Thomas reprimanded one of the children and "made things rather lively ... Cold water, hot water, pokers and any amount of angry words were brought into requisition ... ."

Then things got even more crazy with this March 16, 1882, headline:
 


It would be thrilling only to a genealogist. (Or maybe a serial killer.) 

It appears my ancestor had taken up with a woman, Mary Bergan, who'd left her husband (or he left her, as the Cincinnati Daily Gazette claimed) and was staying in the European boarding house. The landlady said Thomas told her Bergan was his niece, and he became "desperate" when she was with another man.

On the night in question, Bergan was hanging out with James Murphy, John Collins, and another roomer named Birdie Huston. Thomas waited in the downstairs hallway for the party to leave. Then he leapt from behind the stairs and confronted Murphy. A scuffle ensued and Thomas was cut on the head.

Police detained Bergan, Murphy, Collins and Huston at another lodging house. Collins took the blame for the cutting, with a razor he'd grabbed from Murphy's pocket. 

The Cincinnati Daily Gazette carried some different details, including a gory description of the wound. It was an "ugly-looking" two-inch gash positioned "just back and a little above the left temple." An inch-long fracture was visible in Thomas' skull.

From articles about other relatives, I've learned about a kitchen fire, child's birthday party, barfight, commitment (for one who'd become "violently insane") and other events in their lives that probably wouldn't make the news today. Where court records are missing, newspapers informed about the bootlegging arrest and trial of my great-grandfather (not the one in the Frost line).

In our Find Your Ancestors in Online Newspapers webinar, you'll learn the best websites and techniques to search for articles with this kind of detail about your ancestors.

The webinar is on April 21, and all registrants receive a copy of the presentation slides and access to view the webinar again as often as you want. Find out more about this webinar and sign up at ShopFamilyTree.com!


Newspapers | Webinars
Monday, 11 April 2016 10:51:49 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, 05 April 2016
Raise a Glass: Connecting With German Genealogists Online
Posted by Diane

In some ways, what has happened to online German genealogy in the last few years reflects what’s been going on in the wider family history world: more instant communication and loads of ways for people to connect. Guest writer and author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide and the newly released Trace Your German Roots Online, James M. Beidler, shares how collaboration made possible by the internet has affected his genealogy research.

Two correspondents who the internet figuratively brought to my doorstep stand out to me when I think about my experience with online German research.

The first crossed my path a dozen-plus years ago, when I was trying to track down a female ancestor for whom I (frustratingly!) had an exact birth date but no maiden surname. Her married name was Gertraut Rauch, and I knew her husband had been born in the northeastern section of Berks County, Pa., but all the information I had on her came from her tombstone. I was prowling online bulletin boards, having just realized that these were replacing the “queries” of my first years of doing genealogy (now most people have moved on to online family trees).

In any case, within hours of posting a Rauch query, a researcher named DelLynn Leavitt from Idaho Falls, Idaho, replied saying he knew Gertraut was the daughter of a man named Jacob Sicher. With that small fact, my brick wall came tumbling down. And this type of connection would have previously taken months or years to form, but it took less than a day for us to connect thanks to the internet!

Fast-forward to 2010: After many years and a dozen trips to Salt Lake City’s Family History Library, I finally unearthed the German hometown (Gerolsheim) of my surname immigrant ancestor, Johannes Beÿdeler. Coincidentally, I had already made plans to go to Europe that year to take in the once-in-a-decade Passion Play, so I simply added Gerolsheim to the itinerary. I tried to contact Gerolsheim officials in advance through the town's own website—but there was no email contact listed. Instead, I contacted the local tourist bureau (which did have an e-mail address, and a few days I had a response from the town’s deputy mayor, Klaus May.

I still think Klaus and his wife would have put us up for our entire stay in Germany if we had just asked! Klaus showed us around the town and introduced us to the Ortsbürgermeister (village mayor). With Germany’s largest wine festival in full swing in nearby Bad Dürkheim, we toasted a local Riesling wine with Klaus, his wife, and the mayor to celebrate our newfound friendship. What a great connection to have made through the internet!

Learn more about what the web can do for your German genealogy research in James M. Beidler's Trace Your German Roots Online, available now on ShopFamilyTree.com; order between now and April 28 to get free shipping.


German roots | Social Networking
Tuesday, 05 April 2016 13:35:19 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]