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# Friday, November 30, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Nov. 26-30
Posted by Beth


  • Ancestry.com announces the launch of Newspapers.com, a new web site featuring more than 800 US newspapers dating from the late 1700s to the early 2000s. With more than 25 million pages, Newspapers.com offers historical and present-day newspapers ranging from The New York Times to small town and local newspapers.
The site's search capabilities are specifically designed for newspapers, enabling users to search by keywords, location, time period and newspaper name. A one-year subscription to Newspapers.com is $79.95 for subscribers and $39.95 for Ancestry.com or Fold3.com members.
There currently are no plans to remove any newspaper content from Ancestry.com. Most of the newspapers on the new site (more than 15 million of the 25 million pages) are not part of Ancestry.com records. Ancestry.com is actively producing millions of new pages per month from microfilm, and is working with newspaper publishers and microfilm owners to increase the number of newspaper titles in its production pipeline for Newspapers.com.


  • The Federation of Genealogical Societies received a $250,000 donation from FamilySearch for its War of 1812 "Preserve the Pensions" Digitization Fund, designed to digitally preserve and index the War of 1812 pension and bounty land records.


Genealogy Events | Genealogy Industry | Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, November 30, 2012 9:30:42 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Thursday, November 29, 2012
10 Best Genealogy Gifts for the Holidays
Posted by Beth

Is hard-to-buy-for Aunt Helen the repository for recipes, photo albums and keepsakes? Does Grandpa Joe archive all of your family's facts and dates in his head—not to mention all those lesser-known scintillating tidbits? If you need holiday gift ideas for your genealogically inclined relatives, look no further!

Click here for Family Tree Magazine's 10 must-have items to help discover, preserve and celebrate your family's history, making you the family hero in the process. (And, you can always get a gift for yourself and just wrap it for the big day!)


Genealogy books | saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Thursday, November 29, 2012 9:13:39 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 28, 2012
MyHeritage Acquires Geni.com
Posted by Beth

MyHeritage, the popular online family history network, announced today that it has acquired Geni.com, a pioneer in collaborative family tree building with its focus on creating the World Family Tree.

The acquisition extends MyHeritage's network to 72 million registered users, 1.5 billion profiles and 27 million family trees internationally.

Geni.com will continue to operate as a separate brand based out of its California office, and the services of MyHeritage and Geni.com will initially run independently. MyHeritage plans to give respective users the option to collaborate on family history research by enabling two-way information flows between the sites.

Users of both sites will be able to discover relatives and new ancestral connections through MyHeritage's Smart Matching technology, which finds common matches between family trees. In addition, MyHeritage will apply its recently launched Record Matching technology—matching historical records such as birth, death, census and immigration records—to individuals in Geni.com family trees.

In addition to its acquisition, MyHeritage also announced its $25 million funding round to be used to boost growth of its historical content services and expand its commercial operations worldwide.

UPDATED: Geni CEO Noah Tutak announces immediate benefits to Geni.com users:
  • Free unlimited profile adding—All users can add as many profiles as they'd like to their tree without upgrading to a paid account. There are no limits to the size of a user's tree.
  • Free Merging—All users can now merge duplicate profiles in their tree (privacy and permission rules still apply).
  • Free relationship paths—Users can discover their relationship to historical figures and celebrities, and even distant relatives.
  • Free family tree chart downloads—All users can now download a high-quality chart of their family tree to their computer at no charge. 
  • No ads—Ads have been removed to provide users with a cleaner, less distracting interface.
  • More privacy—Living people who have not joined Geni will become private and will not be searchable on Google.

 


Genealogy Industry | International Genealogy
Wednesday, November 28, 2012 10:57:05 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Can't-Miss December Live Webinars
Posted by Beth


We know December can be a bit crazy, with all the shopping, caroling and decking the halls. Find a moment of calm among the clatter by blocking out time for one—or both—of Family Tree University's December live webinars ... and keep your genealogical research on track.

 


State Genealogy Series
Kansas Genealogy Crash Course: Find Your Sunflower State Ancestors
Searching for your Sunflower State ancestors? In the 19th century, this Midwest plot of prairie was home to Native Americans and European settlers alike. If your ancestors lived in the vicinity of Topeka, Wichita or Kansas City, let presenter Kathleen Reid Rippel lead you to your roots.

Date: Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012
Time: 7pm EST/6pm CST/5pm MST/4pm PST
Duration: 1 hour
Price: $49.99 ($39.99 through tomorrow, Nov. 29)

What You'll Learn:
  • Fundamental Kansas history, from the Louisiana Purchase to the American Civil War
  • State-specific tips for tracing American Indian, English, Spanish and African-American and other ethnic ancestors
  • Key online sources for Kansas records
  • Tricks for finding your roots from Topeka to Wichita, Dodge City to Kansas City
  • PLUS: This webinar comes with two free downloads: a copy of our Kansas State Research Guide and our Kansas City Guide.
Register Here: Kansas Genealogy Crash Course: Find Your Sunflower State Ancestors

Four Fun Factoids from Presenter Kathleen Reid Rippel:
  • The Pikes Peak Gold Rush was actually in Kansas territory.
  • The Kansas State Historical Society was created by newspapers editors in 1875. It's no surprise, then, that Kansas is one of the best states for newspaper research.
  • Kansas is one of the few states that regularly took a state census. These are still available and provide some extra information. The 1885 and 1895 schedules are especially helpful since the 1890 Federal census is not available.
  • Even if your ancestors didn't settle in Kansas, many researchers discover that their family members stayed for awhile, then returned home or went further west. Others passed through on major trails, including the Oregon Trail and the Santa Fe Trail.




Discover and Preserve Your Family History Series
Using Criminal Court Records Webinar 
Sift through criminal case files to find your ancestors in criminal court records. Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist, will present the essential strategies for locating your ancestors.

Date: Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012
Time: 7pm EST/6pm CST/5pm MST/4pm PST
Duration: 1 hour
Price: $49.99 ($39.99 until Dec. 4)

What You'll Learn:
  • Explanation of the complaint and indictment process as it affected your ancestors
  • The paper trail generated from arrests and gathering witnesses
  • How to find records of pretrial and trial proceedings and what they can tell you about your ancestors
  • How sentences—from the stocks to the penitentiary—were issued and documented
  • PLUS: This webinar comes with a free PDF download: a copy of Court Orders, our guide to courthouse records.
Register Here: Using Criminal Courts Webinar

Four Fun Factoids from Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist:
  • Americans love to trace their roots to the Mayflower. But the first convicted killer in America was John Billington, who arrived on (yep, you guess it) the Mayflower.
  • Throughout history, the criminal law has treated women differently from men: in some cases, more leniently, in others, more harshly. Only a woman, for example, could be convicted of being a common scold.
  • One of the biggest boosts to law enforcement was the development of photography. It made it more difficult for a bad guy to just change his name and move down the road. Many photographs exist from criminal cases starting in the late 1800s, and a fair number can be found online—and not just from the United States.
  • From 1919-1933, large numbers of criminal prosecutions were for alcohol-related offenses, thanks to Prohibition. But Prohibition gave birth to a new type of crime, Organized Crime (with capital letters)—and an explosion of records, particularly at the federal level.


AND, A REMINDER …
Don't miss out! Our one-week workshop, Using Free Genealogy Websites, begins Friday and runs through Friday, Dec. 7. In just one week, this Family Tree University workshop will teach you secrets for gleaning more ancestral information from free sites and databases; for searching the web more effectively; and for taking advantage of fantastic free tools you're not already using. Click here to register.

Public Records | Research Tips | Webinars
Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:24:27 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, November 27, 2012
November 2012 Family Tree Podcast: Digitize Documents and Photos
Posted by Beth

The November 2012 Family Tree Magazine podcast, hosted by Lisa Louise Cooke of Genealogy Gems, celebrates family with a focus on digitizing your documents and photos, including:

You can listen to Family Tree Magazine's free genealogy podcast in iTunes or on FamilyTreeMagazine.com. Show notes are on FamilyTreeMagazine.com, too.


Photos | Podcasts | saving and sharing family history
Tuesday, November 27, 2012 9:49:18 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Monday, November 26, 2012
Cyber Monday Savings
Posted by Beth




Hope you and yours had a lovely Thanksgiving!

Just want to make you aware of our Cyber Monday Savings featuring extra savings on new live webinars, plus limited-quantity value packs, available today only! And, if you didn't get to shop our Thanksgiving Week Sale, you've got until 11:59 pm. EST tonight to take advantage of the awesome savings.

Help friends and family—and yourself!—dig deeper into ancestry at a great value, just in time for the holidays!



saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Monday, November 26, 2012 9:26:24 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 21, 2012
Family Tree Black Friday Sale All Weekend Long!
Posted by Beth


We at Family Tree Magazine wish you and yours a Norman Rockwell-esque Thanksgiving filled to the brim with food, family and fun!

After the last piece of pumpkin pie has been devoured and any leftovers are tucked away in the fridge, thoughts often turn to the upcoming holiday season. Why not get a jumpstart on your holiday shopping—for your genealogy-minded family and friends (as well as yourself!)—from the comfort of your own home?

We're pleased to share our BIGGEST Thanksgiving Week Sale ever—from Thanksgiving Day through 11:59 p.m. EST Cyber Monday (Nov. 26)—featuring our BEST prices of the year! Watch for:

  • Up to 64% off Beginner Genealogy Tools
  • Up to 70% off Research Your Heritage Tools
  • Up to 66% off Online Research Tools
  • Up to 64% off Tools to Organize & Share Your Findings


AND:
  • Up to 40% off Books
  • Up to 45% off On-demand Courses
  • Up to 50% off CDs
  • Up to 70% off Value Packs


PLUS:
  • We're releasing a limited-edition kit perfect for the holidays that you won't want to miss! Watch for it Thursday in our newsletter and on our website.


Let us help you avoid the Black Friday (and crazy weekend!) shopping and traffic frenzy. Take advantage of our BLACK FRIDAY ONLINE SAVINGS ALL WEEKEND LONG AND THROUGH CYBER MONDAY for the BEST prices—and the BEST gifts—for your genealogist friends and family!




saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Wednesday, November 21, 2012 9:00:24 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Asking the Right Questions
Posted by Beth

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to glean genealogical information from your relatives. While you're all gathered together over turkey and trimmings, knowing which questions to ask will make all the difference in getting valuable research tidbits—and for providing the most interesting conversation.

Here are the three most important words to use when trying to unlock your family history

 


Research Tips
Tuesday, November 20, 2012 9:12:16 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, November 19, 2012
Ancestry.com Introduces Community Support Site
Posted by Beth

Ancestry.com has launched a new Community Support site created for collaboration focused on family history research for beginners, product questions, how-to discussions and general help-related topics.

The Support Community is designed to maximize collaboration and encourage members to engage with one another to share similar real-world experiences and ideas.
 
Community Support can be accessed by clicking on "Get Help" at the top of the Ancestry.com homepage. Once on "Online Help," there will be a button for “Ask the Community” on the right-hand side. That link will take you directly to the new Community Support section.
 


Ancestry.com | Research Tips
Monday, November 19, 2012 3:06:54 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
Scavenger Hunt at Grandma's House!
Posted by Beth

If you've got grandkids, nieces or nephews heading over the river and through the woods to your house this Thanksgiving, the holiday gathering is the perfect time to introduce them to genealogy. 


Before- or After-dinner Activities:
Whether you're basting the turkey or basking in a tryptophan afterglow, these printable sheets can keep the little ones busy.
 
Genealogy Word Scramble (Downloadable PDF)

Word Search: Family History Records (Downloadable PDF)

Build Your Family Tree (Fillable and Downloadable PDF)


Weekend Activities:
If you've got a little more time and can be involved in the process, these activities offer a great opportunity to talk about family history while making memories together.

Create a Tombstone Rubbing

Make Picture Magnets

Scavenger Hunt



Celebrating your heritage | Genealogy for kids | Genealogy fun
Monday, November 19, 2012 9:17:54 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, November 16, 2012
Mocavo Announces Community Digitization Grant
Posted by Beth

Mocavo, a genealogy search engine and now a growing records site with its acquisition of ReadyMicro, is offering a $25,000 grant to enable other stewards of genealogical content to share their information.

Mocavo is seeking proposals from organizations with genealogical content, archives or historical records that they want to make freely available online.

The grant provides the recipient with $25,000 of digitization services from ReadyMicro, including digital media organized into a searchable database; unlimited display and distribution rights for the resulting digital media; and an online version of the database which may be presented on the grant recipient’s website. The information will also be shared at Mocavo's site.

More information about the program, as well as the application form, can be found here. The deadline is February 28, 2013.


Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, November 16, 2012 11:31:02 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Genealogy News Corral, Nov. 12-16
Posted by Beth



  • Familyrelatives.com has released three new military collections containing lists of more than 35,000 British and Dominion Officers who were killed or captured during the Great War:
British Officers Prisoners of War 1914-1918

Officers Who Died in the Great War 1914-1919 

The Bond of Sacrifice (a biographical record of British officers who fell in the Great War)   


Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives
Friday, November 16, 2012 9:09:11 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 15, 2012
Mocavo Announces Free Scanning Service
Posted by Beth

If you've got piles of genealogical research laying around, or old books or historical documents gathering dust, Mocavo, the world's largest genealogy search engine, has a "get-'er-done" scanning solution for you to digitize your materials.

The company has announced its Free Scanning Service, available now through the end of the year, that will scan members' historical and genealogical materials—books, documents and standard-size paper sheets—to bring them online for their owners and the rest of the Mocavo community.

ReadyMicro, Mocavo's digitization group, will handle the free document scanning. A member's document(s) will be scanned, and he or she will then receive a digital copy of each document. (Member can have their materials shipped back to them for $10/shipment plus the cost of shipping.) The members' documents will also be placed online at Mocavo.

The company's goal is to work with its community to bring all of the world's genealogical information online for free, helping to put everyone's family history within reach.

This scanning service is applicable for:
  • Paper documents
  • Unbound books and books that can have their binding removed
  • Photocopies of original content
  • Notes and paper family trees
This scanning service is not applicable for:
  • Photographs 
  • Moldy or damaged documents
  • Copyrighted materials
  • Non-historical content
  • Very fragile content
  • Small pieces of paper
  • Old newspapers or clippings
  • Documents larger than 11x17 inches
  • Photographs cannot be processed at this time.

Learn more about Mocavo’s Free Scanning Service here.


Genealogy Industry | Historic preservation | saving and sharing family history
Thursday, November 15, 2012 11:56:02 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 14, 2012
LIFE Shares Rare Ellis Island Photos
Posted by Beth


LIFE has released rare photographs from Ellis Island taken by one of its preeminent photographers, Alfred Eisenstaedt. His photos, some never seen before, chronicle a day in 1950 when political bureaucracy had delayed the processing of immigrants looking to step onto American soil.

Eisenstaedt, who was also an immigrant, captures scenes that mirror those in Ellis Island photos taken decades in the early 1900s.

Interested in tracing your immigrant ancestors? Then be sure to check out our 101 Best Immigration Websites


immigration records | Photos
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 9:27:10 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Family Tree Firsts Blogger Entries Due Friday
Posted by Beth



Just a friendly reminder that if you're a newbie genealogist, you could be Family Tree Magazine's next Family Tree Firsts blogger!

We're looking for someone who enjoys writing and is interested in his or her family history, but is just starting—or hasn't yet started—to research it.

We'll select one winner based on the strength of the application. Over the course of six months, you'll have access to Family Tree Magazine's how-to genealogy products, Family Tree University classes and webinars, as well as other products, services and surprises from our partners. You'll blog once a week to share your genealogical finds, trials and tribulations. We might even include you in a future issue of the magazine!

To enter, click here to fill out an application and compose your first blog post. This will let us get to know you and see how you'd write your blog. But, hurry! The deadline is Friday, Nov. 16. Good luck!


Family Tree Firsts | saving and sharing family history
Tuesday, November 13, 2012 11:25:12 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, November 12, 2012
Document the Lives of Your Military Ancestors
Posted by Beth





Celebrate your ancestors who served in the military or lived through historical conflicts by exploring and documenting their lives. With the Military Research Value Pack, you'll get easy-to-use tools that will guide you through:
  • What records to look for—military or otherwise—and how to locate them
  • How to find and mine online records
  • Research tips and guidance for tracing ancestors' involvement in specific US wars and conflicts
You'll find that many types of military documents—from service to pension to land records—can reveal important information about your family tree, including soldiers' widows and children. Even ancestors who didn't serve might have left behind draft records.

___

And, a reminder:
There's still time to register for one (or more) of the 16 Family Tree University courses that begin today, including:
Use code FTU1112 and save 20 percent!


Editor's Pick | German roots | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Monday, November 12, 2012 10:26:09 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, November 09, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Nov. 5-9
Posted by Beth

  • The University of Indianapolis is teaming up with Ancestry.com in a first-of-its-kind initiative to encourage its students to explore and reflect on how their family history impacts their identity. All UIndy students, faculty and staff have been granted access to all Ancestry.com content available from computers and mobile devices anywhere on campus, as well as to on-campus identity workshops and seminars.


  • Family tree building wiki site WikiTree has released MatchBot, an automated matching tool that crawls the sites database checking for high-probability matches in the trees on the site. When it finds a match, it emails the tree managers with a match proposal. They can merge the profiles, create an "unmerged match" or reject the merge. Until now, members discovered such matches using traditional searches and the not-automated FindMatches tool.

  • In a new blog series on Ancestry.com, the family of Rob and Kathy Brown and their five children are embarking on a family history journey in an RV decorated with Ancestry.com branding. The Browns will travel for six to nine months and more than 10,000 miles, through 42 states and 40 major cities, discovering the stories of their ancestors and blogging along the way. Read blog posts in the Great Ancestry Adventure series here and check out photos on Facebook here.


 



Free Databases | NARA | Research Tips
Friday, November 09, 2012 9:36:34 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 08, 2012
The National Archives of Ireland Launches Genealogy Site
Posted by Beth

Researching your Irish roots? A new Irish online free resource is now available to aid your research.

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht in Ireland, has today formally launched The National Archives of Ireland's new genealogy-specific website. 

The following collections are now freely available on the site:
The census information links to the already established website, but the latter two are newly released today. The Tithe Applotment Books, in particular, are a major resource, being an early 19th century precursor to Griffith's Valuation; these are the actual images from the books.

Joining the site in near future:
  •  Calendars of Wills and Administrations (1858-1922)
  •  Nineteenth-century census survivals (1821-1851)
  •  Valuation Office House and Field Books (1848-1860)
  •  Census Search Forms for the 1841 and 1851 Censuses


Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites | UK and Irish roots
Thursday, November 08, 2012 10:26:51 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
Webinar Sneak Peek: Top 25 Tips for Finding Your Colonial Ancestors
Posted by Beth




Wherever your Colonial kin come from—Jamestown to Roanoke, Plymouth to Massachusetts Bay—you'll discover helpful strategies for researching them in our Tuesday, Nov. 13 hour-long webinar. Here's a sneak peek of this exclusive webinar. Don't miss out; register now! 

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 13
Starting Time: 7pm ET/6pm CT/5pm MT/4pm PT
Price: $49.99
Presenter: D. Joshua Taylor  
Topics:
  • Essential tricks for tracing colonial immigrants
  • A brief history of Colonial America, from the Revolutionary War to the Louisiana Purchase
  • New England, the Middle Colonies, Chesapeake Bay Colonies, the Lower South and the Frontier, including which ethnic groups settled which areas during this period
  • Key strategies for unearthing your early American roots
  • Common and lesser-known resources for records of your Colonial kin
  • Best Colonial genealogy websites and how they can help your genealogy research



Editor's Pick | Research Tips | Webinars
Thursday, November 08, 2012 9:14:22 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 07, 2012
Genealogy Site Mocavo Adds 17,000 Free, Searchable Yearbooks
Posted by Diane

Mocavo, a genealogy search engine and—since the September acquisition of digitization company ReadyMicro—a growing records site, is adding a free collection of about 17,000 high school and college yearbooks. The collection comprises nearly 3.5 million pages and stretching over 100 years of history.

Yearbooks not only give information about a student or school employee, but they also often pair those details with photos. You'll need to create a free Mocavo account in order to search the collection. Here's my search for a great-aunt who lived in Ohio:

Mocavo yearbook collection

Indexing was by optical character recognition (OCR). The search found a yearbook page containing my aunt's given name and surname, but in the names of different people:

Mocavo yearbook collection

If you scroll down on the yearbooks search page, you'll find an alphabetical list of schools included in the collection. Use the search box to filter the list by place:

Mocavo yearbook collection

You can click a yearbook title to search or browse within that book:

Mocavo yearbook collection

Read more about the Mocavo yearbook collection and see an infographic about it on the Mocavo blog.



Got early American ancestors? Our Nov. 13 webinar, Top 25 Tips for Finding Your Colonial Ancestors, will help you overcome the challenges of genealogy during this era. Click here to learn more!

Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites
Wednesday, November 07, 2012 1:00:06 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Tips for Researching Your Ancestors' Military Records
Posted by Beth

Veterans Day is Sunday, Nov. 11, a time to honor those military men and women who have served our country.

Chances are strong that someone in your family was a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, guardsman or state militiaman. Even if you don't have irrefutable evidence of an ancestor's military service, make a timeline of wars he lived through; check for military records if his age made him eligible to enlist. And, don't assume your female ancestors didn't leave records: They may have served in WWII Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, for example.

Because military service was so common, you'll find lots of online resources—everything from huge, government-sponsored databases to a tiny town's WWI casualty list. Military records even encompass those who didn't serve in the armed forces; for example, after the Selective Service Act of 1917, 24 million men ages 18 to 45 filled out WWI draft registration cards between June 1917 and September 1918. Even if he didn't enlist, your ancestor's draft registration card is probably available at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).

To get started, check out these free military research articles from FamilyTreeMagazine.com:

And, ShopFamilyTree.com also offers military research resources:  

Did You Know?
Veterans Day originated as Armistice Day on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Seven years later, Congress passed a resolution for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday in 1938. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the holiday's name to Veterans Day as a way to honor those who served in all American wars.

Today's Veterans, By the Numbers
The US Census Bureau shares the following veteran statistics based on its 2011 American Community Survey findings:
  • 21.5 million military veterans
  • 9.2 million veterans ages 65 and older
  • 2.3 million black veterans
  • 1.6 million female veterans
When They Served
  • 7.5 million Vietnam-era veterans
  • 5.4 million peacetime-only veterans
  • 5.1 million Gulf War veterans (representing service from Aug. 2, 1990 to present)
  • 2.4 million Korean War veterans
  • 1.8 million World War II veterans



Military records | Research Tips
Wednesday, November 07, 2012 10:53:15 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, November 06, 2012
A Quick Take on US Voting
Posted by Beth

Hello! I'm Beth, former editor of Memory Makers magazine, and I'll be sharing genealogy-related information with you while Diane Haddad heads out on maternity leave until mid-January.

As you head to the polls to cast your vote today (unless you voted early, like me), it's a great time to appreciate your right as an American citizen. Not every American has had this privilege available in his or her lifetime.

Here's a quick look at the US voting timeline:
1789: Constitution empowers states to set voting rights; most enfranchise only male property owners age 21 and older
1830s: Property requirements begin to ease
1848: Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY, launches suffrage movement
1870: 15th Amendment extends voting rights to African-American men
1890: Wyoming allows women to vote
1920: 19th Amendment grants women's suffrage
1940: American Indians are recognized as citizens, although not all are allowed to vote until 1947
1964: 24th Amendment prohibits poll taxes
1965: Voting Rights Act protects minority voters
1971: 26th Amendment lowers voting age to 18

For more interesting tidbits on the history of US voting, see this article on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.

Wondering if your ancestors declared their political leanings?

  • Check with your ancestor's county board of elections, local library, town hall or historical society for information on old voter registration records in the area.
  • The Family History Library (FHL) may have town or county lists of registered voters or those who paid poll taxes. Search your ancestral state archives website for voting, and try running a keyword search of the FHL online catalog on the town, county or state name and the word voting.
  • Subscription website Ancestry.com has some voting-related records and digitized books, so if you're a member, run the same search of its online catalog.

Be sure your voice is among the 90 million Americans expected to cast their vote today!  


Ancestry.com | Family Tree Magazine articles | Public Records
Tuesday, November 06, 2012 8:31:06 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, November 05, 2012
Why Yes, It Is Possible To Do Genealogy Online for Free!
Posted by Diane

Free is such as nice word—and we're going to help you apply it to your online genealogy research in our next One-Week Workshop.

Using Free Genealogy Websites One-Week Workshop

Our Using Free Genealogy Websites weeklong online workshop, taking place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 7, will teach you how to make the most of free websites and services to help you discover your roots. You'll learn:
  • secrets to glean more ancestral information from free sites and databases
  • how to search the web more effectively
  • the best free online genealogy tools—including those you’re not already using
The workshop gives you access to nine pre-recorded video classes—including encore presentations of some of our best Virtual Genealogy Conference sessions—featuring on-screen demos of the recommended websites and strategies.

Classes cover topics such as powering up your web searches, how to find online historical books mentioning your family, searching the free Ellis Island passenger database, using online newspaper research tools and more.

You'll also participate in daily message board discussions to ask questions, exchange ideas and connect with other students and expert workshop staff.

You can participate at your convenience throughout the week: Watch one class per day or fit them all in over a long weekend, then immediately apply what you’ve learned to your genealogy research.

Regular tuition for the Using Free Genealogy Websites One-Week Workshop is $129.99. But you can save $35 by using code WORKSHOPEARLY at checkout. Just hurry, this special code expires Friday, Nov. 16.



Family Tree University | Free Databases | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Web Sites | Videos
Monday, November 05, 2012 9:57:54 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Friday, November 02, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Oct. 29-Nov. 2
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch has announced its US Immigration and Naturalization community indexing project is halfway to its goal of creating a free online collection of US passenger lists, border crossing records, naturalization records, and other immigration documents. Two months into the project, 85,000 volunteers have indexed more than 15 million records.

    FamilySearch hopes to have 30 million records indexed by the end of the year.  You can see what's been indexed so far and register to help out at FamilySearch.org/immigration.
  • According to Ancestry.com, actor George Clooney is Abraham Lincoln's half-first cousin five times removed through Lincoln's maternal grandmother, Nancy Hanks. Then men also share a home state of Kentucky: Clooney was born in Lexington; Lincoln, in Hardin County.

    Most genealogists understand such connections aren't really big news—with every generation, each of us has exponentially more cousins, and some of them are bound to be famous (others are bound to be deadbeats)—but writing this little blurb let me gaze at photos of George Clooney.
  • Speaking of making money doing genealogy, the Board for Certification of Genealogists is offering new video testimonials from professional researchers to help you decide if certification is right for you. The site also has posted an hour-long seminar about what you can expect from the certification process (and what's expected of you). 


Ancestry.com | Celebrity Roots | FamilySearch | Genealogy societies | immigration records
Friday, November 02, 2012 11:28:10 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 01, 2012
Historical Hallows Eve
Posted by Tyler

Hi, I’m Taylor, the fall intern here at Family Tree Magazine. Nice to meet you all!

As Halloween rolls around, you begin thinking of costumes, candies and creatures. But where did all these spooks and treats come from? Before you crack out the latest scary movie and devour your favorite snack, let’s catch up on some Hallow-history.

According to our new book Good Old Days, My Ass Irish Potato Famine Immigrants brought Halloween and the jack-o-lantern to America after 1846. The original jack-o-lantern tale is rather gruesome. “Jack” trapped the devil inside a tree until he agreed that Jack, an avid sinner, would never go to hell. The devil then gave Jack a burning ember to light his way through the dark places in the world. Jack placed the ember into a lantern made of a turnip. When the Irish reached America, pumpkins proved more practical than turnips.

But, one of the world’s oldest holidays, Halloween celebrations have been going on since way past our time and have evolved from the festivals celebrated by our ancestors. Celtic Ireland is credited with creating our spook fests. Known as Samhain, Oct. 31 was for clearing out the old and starting new. As the Celtic New Year, Samhain marked the beginning of the 11th month.

Celtics believed that on this day, the thin veil between our world and the otherworld was weakest, allowing spirits to inhabit the land for a single night. While this mostly included deceased family members, malevolent souls were also allowed passage. The villagers would dress up in scary, distorted masks to deter evil spirits from causing them harm.

The Romans celebration was based on Pomona, the goddess of fruit trees, especially apples. Many dishes served during this gathering were apple based; this is where “bobbing for apples” is derived as well as caramel apples. Seventh century Pope Boniface wanted to channel citizens away from Pagan traditions and declared Nov. 1, All Saints Day, which kicked off Oct. 31 as All Hallows Eve.

While many countries continue these traditions, Hispanic countries have their own interpretation. Dia de Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a three-day celebration beginning on Oct. 31. This is a time when deceased loved ones return to their homes. Family members build alters to welcome their ancestors. They will gather favorite foods and items of the deceased as well as flowers and incense to guide them home. The family will then visit at the graveyard to remember those they’ve lost.

Check out these Halloween history websites to learn more.

www.history.com/topics/jack-olantern-history

www.randomhistory.com/2008/09/01_halloween.html

www.loc.gov/folklife/halloween.html



Thursday, November 01, 2012 8:23:44 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]