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# Wednesday, February 19, 2014
MyHeritage and BillionGraves Launch Global Gravestone Recording Initiative
Posted by Diane

Genealogy website MyHeritage and cemetery recording site BillionGraves are collaborating to launch a crowdsourcing initiative to preserve information from cemeteries around the world.

BillionGraves offers an app for iOS and Android that cemetery visitors can use to upload gravestone photos and their GPS coordinates to the web. Volunteers can then transcribe the images on the BillionGraves website, making them searchable.

MyHeritage is helping to make the app available in 25 languages and support Gregorian, Julian and Hebrew dates.

Over the coming weeks, MyHeritage users will receive information about how to download the app and participate in this initiative. You can read more about it and see what the app looks like on the MyHeritage blog.

Update: The partners have opened up the website where you can register and get started recording graves.

Researchers will be able to search the gravestone information free on BillionGraves.com (where volunteers have already uploaded millions of gravestone records) and on MyHeritage. Anyone with a MyHeritage family tree will receive free Record Matches to the data.


Cemeteries | MyHeritage
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 4:32:35 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Genealogy Problem Solving: 6 Strategies That Helped Me
Posted by Diane

Our Feb. 27 webinar Genealogy Problem Solving: Creative Ideas for Overcoming Research Challenges got me thinking about the strategies that have helped me solve problems in my family history research. I looked back on some old posts and came up with these six before I realized what time it was:

1. Tracing family and friends, aka “cluster genealogy.” This approach helped me discover my third-great-grandmother Mary Frost’s maiden name, which wasn’t legible in her divorce case file. You can read about it in this blog post

2. Looking for alternate sources of missing information. Six or seven years ago, my request for records of my great-grandfather’s 1913 bootlegging trial in Texarkana, Texas, came back with a “found nothing” note. Not long after, at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, I scrolled and scrolled through microfilmed Bowie County, Texas, court records. Like the county clerk, I came up empty.

But while attending a genealogy conference in Little Rock, Ark., in 2009, I jumped at the chance to use microfilmed Texarkana newspapers (Texarkana straddles the Texas/Arkansas border). They didn't provide the level of juicy detail I’d hoped for, but several articles had updates on the trial. 

3. Using multiple sources for the same data. Using the Ellis Island passenger search, Stephen P. Morse’s One-Step search form for the Ellis Island site, and passenger records on Ancestry.com eventually led me to my Haddad great-grandparents in passenger list records of ships arriving in New York. 

4. Formulating a theory. When I found two mystery men in a family cemetery plot, I looked at what I knew about them and then came up with a theory about their identities. From there, I could come up with steps to see if my theory was correct, which you can read about here.  

5. Researching a potential relative forward in time. I do this often when I'm not sure whether a record I find is really my ancestor. For example, I've found online trees with my great-great-grandmother in a different family. I understand how it happened: She was born just after the 1880 census and her 1890 census listing is, of course, toast. A similarly named person lived in Indiana in the 1900 census.

What if I was the one with the wrong lady? I researched the other person forward, and she ended up in northern Indiana—so she couldn’t be my great-great-grandmother in Covington, Ky. (I later found my ancestor in 1900, listed under a nickname as a servant for an unrelated family.) 

6. Keeping on keepin’ on. Continuing to research an ancestor—not necessarily focusing just on my problem or question—has probably been the most helpful strategy. It also requires the most time and patience.

As an example: It was after I found my great-grandfather Mike Haddad’s passenger list that I requested his alien registration record (AR-2), which gave his first name as Fablo. Later, I found a son's marriage record, which gave his father's name as Fadlow. A few years ago, I ordered microfilm of the baptismal register listing my grandfather. The register named his father as “Daddlod.” 

Had I found these records before beginning my ship's list search years ago, I would’ve looked harder at the passenger named Fadlo Hadad—who turned out to be my ancestor. But as it was, not realizing my great-grandfather Mike had used that name, it took me several more years to identify him in passenger lists.

What genealogy research strategies have you used to solve questions? In our Genealogy Problem Solving webinar, taking place Feb. 27 at 7p.m. ET, Gena Philibert Ortega will share creative techniques she and other professional genealogists use to overcome difficult problems. Anyone who registers will receive access to download the webinar for future viewing, as well as a PDF of the presentation slides.

Click here for more details on Genealogy Problem Solving: Creative Ideas for Overcoming Research Challenges.



Genealogy Web Sites | Research Tips | Webinars
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 2:37:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, February 17, 2014
Now Available: Free Family Tree Magazine Podcast February Episode
Posted by Diane

The February 2014 Family Tree Magazine's podcast, hosted by Lisa Louise Cooke and sponsored by Blackblaze online backup service, is now available for your listening pleasure!

The topics include
  • six simple ways (including three free ones) to use Ancestry.com
  • Lisa's favorite free family history tools
  • a peek at Family Tree University's upcoming Virtual Genealogy Conference
  • what to look for in the March/April 2014 Family Tree Magazine, a special online genealogy issue
You can listen to the Family Tree Magazine Podcast for free in iTunes or at FamilyTreeMagazine.com. Enjoy!



Ancestry.com | Family Tree Magazine articles | Family Tree University | Genealogy Apps | Genealogy Software | Podcasts
Monday, February 17, 2014 12:48:44 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, February 14, 2014
Genealogy News Corral, Feb. 10-14
Posted by Diane

Happy Valentine's Day and President's Day weekend!
  • We don't often think about slavery in northern US states, but a new website called Mapping Slavery in Detroit documents a University of Michigan project to explore the history of slavery in Detroit. A chart shows stats on slaves and free African-Americans from censuses in 1773, 1779, 1782 and 1810, and an interactive map shows slavery-related sites.
  • A Facebook post led me to a website about an Underground Railroad route along a road I often travel here in Cincinnati. Hamilton Avenue Road to Freedom has background information, a map, photos and more.


African-American roots | Celebrating your heritage | Social History | Social Networking
Friday, February 14, 2014 12:36:20 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 13, 2014
8 "Next Steps" For Starting Your Genealogy
Posted by Diane

This week, I had the pleasure of Skyping with a class of sixth graders working on a genealogy project. Here's a photo their teacher Tweeted:



They'd already interviewed family members and done some research into census records, so after talking a little bit about how I got interested in genealogy and answering their questions, I suggested some "next steps" they could take.

We had to stop before I could really unleash my inner genealogy geek (lucky for my captive young audience!). I'll add to the list here for you with tips from our Family History Starter Kit.



I think these tips work for all ages, whether you're starting from scratch or you've done a little genealogy and you want to make sure you covered these steps:
  • Look around your house (or your parents' or another relative's house, with permission) for "home sources": old photos, letters, yearbooks, military discharge papers, etc.
  • Try to find a relative in World War I draft registration records. This draft captured about 23 percent of the US population in 1917 and 1918; all men living in the United States between the ages of roughly 18 and 45 had to apply. That means if you had relatives in the United States at that time, there's a good chance you'll find someone. WWI draft records are free on FamilySearch.org. (And with the centennial of the start of World War I coming up, it's a good time to learn about the experiences of ancestors of that era.) 
  • Find an old map of the place your family lived, and see if you can locate their home and where they went to school or work. It gives you a picture of the neighborhood and helps you see how it's changed. The David Rumsey website has a huge collection of maps you can search by place and download for free (registration is required for very high-resolution versions).
  • Go to the library in your ancestor's hometown or visit the website and browse the local history and genealogy collection. All libraries are different, but you might find old city directories (which are like telephone books, not that today's grade schoolers remember those), newspapers, books about the area, surname files of papers related to particular families, indexes to local records and more.
  • Search for relatives' graves in sites like Find A Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. Also look for death information in the Social Security Death Index, also free on FamilySearch.

  • Run a place search of the FamilySearch online catalog so you an see what type of records are available for the places your family lived. See what's digitized for free at FamilySearch.org for those places, too. Continue your place-based research by exploring the USGenWeb Project state and county pages for places your family lived.

  • Make a family tree chart so you can see how everyone in your family fits together. You can do this on paper on a five-generation pedigree chart, in a genealogy software program, or on a family tree-building website. There are many websites where you can build a family tree (usually, for free), including FamilySearch.org, Ancestry.com, MyHeritage, Geni, and Tribal Pages. Find other options listed at Cyndi's List.

  • Start a research log with your genealogy to-do list of records you want to look up and databases you want to search. A spreadsheet works well for this, and you can note the record, ancestor's name, repository or website, and other pertinent information.   
In the general genealogy advice category, I would add:
  • Gather information not only on parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. (your ancestors), but also on aunts, uncles and cousins (your collateral relatives). Collateral relatives' records could have information about your ancestors, and they'll help you find distant relatives who are still living.

  • Keep track of where you found each piece of new genealogy information. Write down the type of record; title of the microfilm, book, or online collection and website where you found it; author and publisher (a person and/or an organization); date and place of publication; the page number with the information; and date you accessed the website (if applicable).

What "next steps" and general advice would you suggest for a beginning genealogist?

The Family History Starter Kit is great for folks who want to start researching their family history or who've done a little genealogy and aren't sure what to do next. The collection of how-to books, downloads and printed lessons have a friendly approach that guides you through those first steps—they're full of tips you can start using right away to discover your family history. Learn more about it here.


Genealogy for kids | Research Tips | Social Networking
Thursday, February 13, 2014 9:46:08 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Free Black History Records on Fold3 & More African-American Genealogy Resources
Posted by Diane

In honor of Black History Month this month, genealogy website Fold3 is offering free access to its Black History Collection of records through the end of February. That includes:
  • Washington, DC court slave and emancipation records

  • South Carolina estate inventories and bills of sale (1732-1872)

  • US Colored Troops Civil War service records

  • Southern Claims Commission records (which also mention nonAfrican-Americans who made claims against the federal government for property lost during the Civil War)

  • War Department Military Intelligence Division records on "Negro subversion"

  • ... and more titles. 
You'll need to register for a Basic Fold3 membership in order to view records. Here's the Fold3 blog post about this offer.

Looking for other resources and records for tracing African-American ancestors? Here are several other sites we like (the last three are more how-to focused; the ones before that are more records-focused): Learn how to research African-American roots during and after slavery in Family Tree University's Finding African-Americans in Newspapers four-week online course with instructor Tim Pinnick. It starts Feb. 24—learn more here.

You'll find our African-American genealogy guides in ShopFamilyTree.com.


African-American roots | Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites
Wednesday, February 12, 2014 1:22:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, February 07, 2014
Genealogy News Corral: RootsTech 2014 Edition
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch's RootsTech conference, going on through Saturday in Salt Lake City, kicked off its Friday with a dynamic keynote address by the Legal Genealogist Judy Russell. She started with an archivist's statement that oral family history can be lost in just three generations, because it isn't purposely and accurately passed down (see the exact quote on Judy's blog). The recording isn't yet available on the RootsTech website, but it will be.

Remember that you can watch live streamed presentations on the RootsTech.org home page, too. (Try switching browsers if you just see a black screen. I had to switch to Chrome from my usual Firefox.) 

Yesterday, I posted news from FamilySearch, including a new obituary indexing initiative and free access to Ancestry.com, MyHeritage and findmypast.com at Family History Centers (and, for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, from home).

Here are a few more news items:
  • Subscription/pay-per-view website findmypast.com is restructuring its subscription offerings to include a one-month option. A one-month US subscription for $9.95, which includes all records from the USA. A one month World subscription costs $19.95, which includes access to records from around the world.
  • Subscription genealogy site MyHeritage has added 815 million US public records of US residents to its SuperSearch. This compilation was assembled from telephone directories, property tax assessments, credit applications, voter registration lists and other records available to the public. The information spans the last five decades, making it helpful for finding living relatives. Read more on the MyHeritage blog.
  • Mocavo has added 20,000 new databases, bringing its database count to more than 250,000. They're free to access if you search one database at a time (find them listed here). To view match details when you run a search across all databases, you must be a premium member ($7 or $9 per month). One thing you can do is search all databases for an ancestor, view the match "snippets" for promising-looking records, note the databases they're in, then go to the database listings and search the ones you need.
  • In a low-fanfare breakfast with a small group of bloggers and media, representatives from subscription site Ancestry.com said that records of Mexico and Germany are an area of content focus, among other plans. I'll once again send you the extremely thorough Ancestry Insider for additional details.

  • RootsMagic, maker of RootsMagic software, just launched a RootsMagic app for Android devices. You can access your RootsMagic files, explore your tree, view all your RootsMagic data and more. Read about the RootsMagic app here, and download it here
If you want to see what it's like to be at RootsTech, Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings is posting detailed daily reports (including links to posts by other bloggers who are at the conference), as is Miriam Robbins at AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors.


Ancestry.com | FamilySearch | findmypast | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Software | Genealogy Web Sites | MyHeritage
Friday, February 07, 2014 4:20:21 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 06, 2014
FamilySearch Launches Obituary Indexing Effort & More News From RootsTech
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch held a media dinner last night before the start of the RootsTech conference. The Ancestry Insider has a great report on the key points. A few I'd like to highlight:
  • This fourth-annual RootsTech has about 8,000 registrants. After the conference, 622 locations around the world will hold events featuring recorded RootsTech sessions.
  • FamilySearch is launching an effort to index 100 million newspaper obituaries this year. A pirate named Capt. Jack Starling is apparently roaming around the conference in promotion of this effort, so don't be surprised if you see him popping up in your Facebook news feeds.
  • Ancestry.com, findmypast and MyHeritage, each of which has strategic partnerships with FamilySearch, will be free to use at FamilySearch Centers. Each website also has plans to let users transfer information between a tree on that site and a FamilySearch family tree.

    Update: According to blogger Dick Eastman, members of the LDS church (which operates FamilySearch) will receive free in-home access to these commercial sites.  
The Salt Lake Tribune has an article here with more on FamilySearch's commercial partnerships.

In other RootsTech news, FamilySearch announced the winners of its annual developer challenge, which rewards the most innovative new concepts to family history. They are Genealogy Systems LLC's Find-A-Record, a searchable index of record collections (so far, mostly on FamilySearch.org); PhotoFaceMatch from Eclipse Identity Recognition Corp.; and the Saving Memories Forever story-saving app. Read more about the winners here.


Ancestry.com | FamilySearch | findmypast | Genealogy Events | MyHeritage
Thursday, February 06, 2014 11:15:04 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, February 05, 2014
Findmypast.com Adds PERSI Genealogical Index
Posted by Diane

Was it really more than six months ago that subscription/pay-per-view genealogy website findmypast.com announced it planned to add the Periodical Source Index (PERSI) to its databases—and better yet, link each entry to an image of the original article it refers to? Time flies!

You now can search PERSI on findmypast.com. If you hover over the Search Records tab and choose Newspapers & Periodicals, then select PERiodical Source Index (or just click here), you'll see:



PERSI, created by librarians at the Allen County (Ind.) Public Library Genealogy Center, is an index to thousands of historical, genealogical and ethnic journals and magazines. Most cover the United States and Canada, but some cover Britain, Ireland and Australia.

The database on findmypast.com includes 2.5 million index entries, and it will be updated on a quarterly basis. Some entries link to the digitized articles, including the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, 1871-1920, and more will be added over time. A partnership with the Federation of Genealogical Societies to preserve society publications is making this effort possible.

When I've searched PERSI in teh past, I've found it difficult to determine if the source article was about my relative or someone else, and what type of information the article contained. How great would it be to just click and read the full article online?

You can search PERSI on findmypast.com by last name, place and/or keyword, and matches include the article title, periodical title and year the article was published. You can click for more information or the digitized article, if you're a findmypast.com subscriber or have pay-as-you-go credits.

Don't limit yourself to name searches, because genealogical society publications often contain descriptions of unique local resources, but not necessarily indexes. Try searching PERSI just by place and/or with a keyword, such as a church your family attended or a place a relative worked.

For PERSI entries that don't link to source articles, you can order copies from the Genealogy Center (click the Services tab). 

Read the full PERSI press release on findmypast.com.
 

findmypast | Genealogy societies | Research Tips
Wednesday, February 05, 2014 11:51:46 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, February 04, 2014
Genealogy Tip: Check the 1900 and 1910 Censuses for Clues to Unknown Children
Posted by Diane

Sometimes the best we can do for a “date night” at our house is hanging out in the living room while my husband watches a game and I do genealogy on the laptop.

On one of these thrilling evenings, I was using the Cincinnati Birth and Death Records (1865-1912) database, a card index created long ago from city vital registers. I kept remarking on the death records of infants I'd come across. Each one made me more grateful for my two healthy (I’m crossing my fingers and knocking on wood right now) little ones.

Greg was feeling the same way. He wondered how a genealogist today could even know to look for a baby who died at a few hours, days or weeks old before official birth and death records began.

You could form a hunch based on long gaps between children, or maybe oral tradition, a tiny headstone, a letter or another home source would be a clue. There’s also the census: The 1900 and 1910 censuses had columns for women indicating “mother of how many children” and “number of those children living.”

I realized then that I’d always assumed my great-great-grandmother Frances (Ladenkotter) Seeger hadn’t lost any of her children. I hadn’t found any records indicating that was the case, and no infant’s headstone is in the family plot.

Sure enough, when I looked again at her listings in the censuses for 1900

and 1910

those two columns showed a nine and a seven. Two of her babies had died. (Of the 12 mothers on the 1900 page, only two had the same number in both columns.)

I looked for them in the Cincinnati database of births and deaths. Joseph Heinrich died in 1877 at 29 days old of “pyaemia result of dorsal abscess” (septicemia related to an abscess on his back). I also found his cemetery burial record (which had his name).  

I found the birth of the second baby, Mary, on Aug. 2, 1878.

I may have found the death: This card, for a baby who died of premature birth at two hours old, has the right address, date (“8-3-78,” which would mean a birth shortly before midnight), and a close last name (Suger), but the baby’s name is Herman instead of Mary.

Either the birth or death card could have an error carried over from the original registers (which still exist, apparently, but are fragile and not available for research), or one made in transcription. I haven’t had any luck searching cemetery records, either.

Details about a relative who died as a newborn more than a century ago might or might not provide leads to additional genealogical information. Either way, putting these babies on the family tree matters to me, as I’m guessing it does to other genealogists. It creates a truer picture of your ancestral family, and more important, it keeps a brief little life from remaining unknown.



Research Tips | Vital Records
Tuesday, February 04, 2014 2:55:21 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [5]