Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
October, 2014 (16)
September, 2014 (17)
August, 2014 (18)
July, 2014 (16)
June, 2014 (18)
May, 2014 (17)
April, 2014 (17)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<July 2013>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
30123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031123
45678910

More Links








# Friday, July 19, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, July 15-19
Posted by Diane

  • Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers and High-Definition Genealogy has launched a new website, Hack Genealogy. With the tagline, "Repurposing today's technology for tomorrow's genealogy," it'll focus on emerging technology inside and outside the genealogy industry, and how it applied to your family history research.
  • The Civil War Trust has released a Civil War In4 video series to answer frequently asked questions about the American Civil War in a modern, digestible format, and in four minutes. So far, the series has 13 videos; watch them at civilwar.org/in4.
  • The General Society of Mayflower Descendants has named its first ever executive director, Walter Louis Powell. The appointment comes after a yearlong search, and is part of a program to modernize the 116-year-old organization. Powell has worked as an historic preservation consultant, and as a visiting history instructor and interim director of the George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, WV. 


Civil War | FamilySearch | Genealogy societies | Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, July 19, 2013 9:11:01 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, July 18, 2013
Genealogy Tools for Tracing Ancestors Across the USA
Posted by Diane

Hey, fellow US family history sleuths! This Family Tree Magazine July genealogy value pack celebrates your American heritage with resources to trace your ancestors all across the USA.

The USA Genealogy Value Pack includes:

  • our popular CD of State Research Guides for every US state, newly revised and updated with the latest information and resources
  • the Family Tree Sourcebook: Your Essential Directory of American County and Town Resources
  • our City Genealogy Guides e-book, with essential research advice for 31 cities across the United States
  • our Researching Revolutionary Ancestors video class with D. Joshua Taylor (yes, the Josh Taylor you've seen revealing ancestral information to Sarah Jessica Parker, Kelly Clarkson and other "Who Do You Think You Are?" guests)
You'll get place-based research guidance, resource listings and maps for every US state, detailed county-level source information, help with municipal records, and demos of strategies for finding Patriot ancestors.

The USA Genealogy Value Pack is on sale in July for $49.99—that's 66% discount. Check it out in ShopFamilyTree.com.

ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Thursday, July 18, 2013 10:31:55 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Free New England Genealogy Records Through July 21 on Ancestry.com
Posted by Diane

Ancestry.com is offering free access to recently updated collections of New England genealogy records through July 21.

The free records include:
  • Massachusetts, Birth Records, 1840-1915
  • New Hampshire, Birth Records, 1659-1900
  • Massachusetts, Marriage Records, 1840-1915
  • New Hampshire, Marriage and Divorce Records, 1659-1947
  • Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915
  • New Hampshire, Death and Disinterment Records, 1754-1947
  • Connecticut, Hale Cemetery Inscriptions, 1675-1934 
  • Rhode Island, State Censuses, 1865-1935
  • Vermont, Vital Records, 1720-1908 
  • Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 
  • Massachusetts, Mason Membership Cards, 1733-1990
Go here to search these records. You'll need to sign up for a free basic Ancestry.com account to view full record details in your search results.

Find expert genealogy research help for New England ancestors in Family Tree Magazine's New England Genealogy Value Pack, on sale now for 44% off in ShopFamilyTree.com.


Ancestry.com
Thursday, July 18, 2013 9:04:34 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, July 16, 2013
Can Findmypast.com Take PERSI From Most-Overlooked to Most-Used Genealogy Resource?
Posted by Diane

PERSI, aka the Periodical Source Index, may be about to go from one of the best most-overlooked genealogy resources to one of the best most-used.

Brightsolid, the British company behind findmypast.com and other genealogy websites, has agreed with PERSI's creators at the Allen County (Ind.) Public Library (ACPL) to publish the index—and the company plans to make each index entry link to an image of the article it refers to.

Let's back up for a minute and talk about PERSI: It's an index to articles in thousands of genealogy and local history periodicals published in the US and Canada back to 1800. Any of which could contain information that helps you with a family or place you're researching

Allen County librarians began creating PERSI in 1986. It now has about 2.5 million citations and adds 100,000 per year, according to the Journal Gazette.

The index was made searchable on Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest Online (which has a more recent version you can search at libraries that offer HeritageQuest Online). You can run a search, and then if you find an index entry that mentions a family or place of interest, you can order a copy of the article from ACPL.

That's been the only way for you to access all those genealogy periodicals. You know, unless you want to subscribe to all of them, and then read them. And then find the periodicals no longer in publication, and read those, too.

Until now. If brightsolid can secure permission from publishers, findmypast.com subscribers will be able to search for articles related to their ancestors, and then link to digitized images of the articles. That can't happen soon enough as far as I'm concerned.

Read more about PERSI in the Journal Gazette.

Don't want to wait? Learn how to use PERSI and other databases in HeritageQuest Online (including family and local histories, censuses and military records) with our HeritageQuest Online Web Guide.



findmypast | Genealogy Industry | Genealogy Web Sites | Research Tips
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 12:05:01 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, July 15, 2013
Watch the "Who Do You Think You Are?" Kelly Clarkson Episode on iTunes
Posted by Diane

The US show "Who Do You Think You Are?" doesn't debut on TLC until July 23, but you already can watch the first episode, featuring singer Kelly Clarkson, on iTunes. Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers tells you how (you'll need to sign up for an Apple ID if you're not already on iTunes).

This morning I watched along as Clarkson traced her Civil War ancestor Isaiah Rose from Ohio to Georgia, where he was imprisoned at Andersonville, and back.

Kelly Clarkson is a hugger. It seems weird to me to hug the archivists and historians at the library, but then I'm not a big hugger in general. If you're learning remarkable and humbling new stories about your ancestors, maybe hugging would be part of your genealogy happy dance.

I don't want to give too much away before the episode airs. So all I'll say is that viewers get to visit the Andersonville National Historic Site, see historical illustrations and photos (including a shocking image of a man who was held there), and hear a contemporary account from a prisoner. To me, that's the best part of the show—you learn about the history that might have affected your own ancestors and that shaped our country.


"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Celebrity Roots
Monday, July 15, 2013 4:33:30 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Friday, July 12, 2013
House Histories: Do You Believe in Ghost Signs?
Posted by Diane

This was a totally  unexpected find: I was casually searching the Library of Congress website for old images of Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, where several ancestors lived. This photo popped up in my results:



The building closest to the camera was once my great-great-grandfather's cigar store and family home. The picture is part of a group of shots from the neighborhood, taken in 1982 for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). There's an accompanying PDF document with history and architecture notes.

When I opened the giant high-resolution TIFF of the image, I saw this:



Do you see it, too? It's a "ghost sign"—the outline of some of the letters from the store's "H.A. Seeger Cigar Manufacturer" sign. Here's a closer look at part of it:



My mom once drove us kids by the building, and we saw where the letters had been. I've often wished we took a photo during that stop—the building's been renovated and that ghost sign is gone. So this is an extra-special find.

This copy of a photo from my family collection shows what the sign looked like back in the day:



In an earlier picture I've posted before, the sign's lettering was different and there was no street lamp or window on the first floor. If I can figure out when those updates happened, it'll help me date this photo.

Time to learn more about this building. Are you researching an ancestor's house? Our guide to constructing a house history is a $4 download in ShopFamilyTree.com.

Here's how found the photo: On the Library of Congress site, I searched for the term Cincinnati German and limited my results to "Photo, Print, Drawing," like so:



The group of pictures was second in my search results. Not everything in the LOC catalog is digitized online, but luckily, these are. I knew to click on it because the streets in the description are the ones around the building.



We list more websites with databases of old photos here. Many state and local archives digitize photos for online memory projects, too.

You can learn more about finding, identifying and preserving old photos from our Photo Detective Collection, with study materials from photo historian Maureen A. Taylor and digital photography expert Nancy Hendrickson.


Libraries and Archives | Photos | Research Tips
Friday, July 12, 2013 11:11:44 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Genealogy News Corral, July 8-12
Posted by Diane

An online petition to release the 1921 Canadian census is circulating. You can read more about it and link to it on the Olive Tree Genealogy blog.


Canadian roots | Celebrity Roots | findmypast
Friday, July 12, 2013 10:18:57 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, July 11, 2013
Using Evernote to Organize My Genealogy Research
Posted by Diane

My former method of genealogy research organization was to email myself notes and records, or use notekeeping gadgets on my iGoogle page.

But with the emails getting buried in my in-box and the impending retirement of iGoogle, I wasn't very organized.

Then I started hearing more about the Evernote web clipper and note-taker, and we began planning an Evernote for genealogists webinar with Lisa Louise Cooke (it's July 25—more details below).

So I gradually started using it, like this:
  • I set up a Genealogy notebook "stack", and within that, notebooks for branches I'm researching.
  • When I need to put a record to request on my genealogy to-do list, I make a note in the appropriate notebook (usually I just copy and paste a catalog record and URL from a repository website) and tag it with the last name, the repository or website, and other relevant tag.

  • Next time I plan to visit some repository, or if I want to focus on a particular family, I can pull up all my notes with the right tags, and there's my to-do list.
  • If I'm away from home, I can add a note using the Evernote app on my phone. I can snap a picture of a record or photo and attach the image to my note.
Here's a peek at what it looks like. Everything in one place, and viewable from anywhere:



I'm feeling a lot less scattered, genealogy-wise, these days. I also use Evernote to keep my grocery list and save business cards, and it helped me get organized for our vacation last month. It's free, unless you need a LOT of storage.

I'm sure there's a lot more I could be using it for—sounds like you can share notes with other researchers and relatives, perform text-recognition of images to make them searchable, annotate images using something called Skitch, set up tables, and more.

So I'm looking forward to the webinar with Lisa. It's called Organize Your Research With Evernote, and it's on Thursday, July 25 at 7 p.m. ET (that's 6 p.m. CT, 5 p.m. MT, 4 p.m. PT).

And you can save $10 if you register now (this early registration offer expires July 18).


Genealogy Apps | Research Tips | Webinars
Thursday, July 11, 2013 10:25:32 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Tuesday, July 09, 2013
Keys to Creating a Great Family Tree Website
Posted by Diane

Do you want to share your genealogy research and connect with cousins through a family history website? Or maybe you want to improve the genealogy website you already have.  

The best family tree websites share these key elements, says Nancy Henrickson, adviser for Family Tree University's Make a Free Family Website in One Week online workshop:
  • Focus
  • Organization
  • Adherence to best practices
  • Consistent updating
To make sure your site is on track in these areas, Nancy suggests asking yourself these questions:

Focus

  • Is the site about a single surname or everyone you're researching?
  • Will you include images?
  • Is it clear to site visitors what the site is about?
  • Is this a research-based site?
  • Do you know the goal of this site?
Organization
  • Have you created logical categories for your posts?
  • Is the site easy to navigate?
  • Have you made it easy for people find out how to contact you?
  • Have you thought about how to organize data?
  • Will you have a photo gallery?
Best Practices
  • Is information presented in small bites vs. large areas of text?
  • Have you added ALT tags to your images?
  • Have you clearly titled each post?
  • Have you selected well-defined tags for each post?
Consistent Updating
  • Do you update your site at least once a week?
  • Do you have a plan for what you'll post? Optimized Images
  • Are your images resized at 72dpi?
  • Are your images in .jpg format?
  • Have you cropped images to highlight the important areas?
In the Make a Free Family Website in One Week online workshop (July 24-31), you'll watch video classes and receive guidance from Nancy. By the end of the workshop, you'll have built a basic genealogy website. Find out more on FamilyTreeUniversity.com.


Editor's Pick | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Web Sites | Tech Advice
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:52:45 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Watch a Preview of "Who Do You Think You Are?" on TLC
Posted by Diane

Excited for the fourth season of "Who Do You Think You Are?" premiering July 23 on TLC? Here's a video preview.

It's longer than the teaser that was released at the end of June, and drops clues to the family history surprises in store for some of the celebrity guests. You'll see them in the video: Kelly Clarkson, Zooey Deschanel, Chris O'Donnell, Christina Applegate, Jim Parsons, Cindy Crawford, Trisha Yearwood and Chelsea Handler. (We posted here about who these people are.) 



"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Celebrity Roots | Videos
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:23:45 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]