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# Monday, July 15, 2013
Watch the "Who Do You Think You Are?" Kelly Clarkson Episode on iTunes
Posted by Diane

The US show "Who Do You Think You Are?" doesn't debut on TLC until July 23, but you already can watch the first episode, featuring singer Kelly Clarkson, on iTunes. Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers tells you how (you'll need to sign up for an Apple ID if you're not already on iTunes).

This morning I watched along as Clarkson traced her Civil War ancestor Isaiah Rose from Ohio to Georgia, where he was imprisoned at Andersonville, and back.

Kelly Clarkson is a hugger. It seems weird to me to hug the archivists and historians at the library, but then I'm not a big hugger in general. If you're learning remarkable and humbling new stories about your ancestors, maybe hugging would be part of your genealogy happy dance.

I don't want to give too much away before the episode airs. So all I'll say is that viewers get to visit the Andersonville National Historic Site, see historical illustrations and photos (including a shocking image of a man who was held there), and hear a contemporary account from a prisoner. To me, that's the best part of the show—you learn about the history that might have affected your own ancestors and that shaped our country.


"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Celebrity Roots
Monday, July 15, 2013 4:33:30 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Friday, July 12, 2013
House Histories: Do You Believe in Ghost Signs?
Posted by Diane

This was a totally  unexpected find: I was casually searching the Library of Congress website for old images of Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, where several ancestors lived. This photo popped up in my results:



The building closest to the camera was once my great-great-grandfather's cigar store and family home. The picture is part of a group of shots from the neighborhood, taken in 1982 for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). There's an accompanying PDF document with history and architecture notes.

When I opened the giant high-resolution TIFF of the image, I saw this:



Do you see it, too? It's a "ghost sign"—the outline of some of the letters from the store's "H.A. Seeger Cigar Manufacturer" sign. Here's a closer look at part of it:



My mom once drove us kids by the building, and we saw where the letters had been. I've often wished we took a photo during that stop—the building's been renovated and that ghost sign is gone. So this is an extra-special find.

This copy of a photo from my family collection shows what the sign looked like back in the day:



In an earlier picture I've posted before, the sign's lettering was different and there was no street lamp or window on the first floor. If I can figure out when those updates happened, it'll help me date this photo.

Time to learn more about this building. Are you researching an ancestor's house? Our guide to constructing a house history is a $4 download in ShopFamilyTree.com.

Here's how found the photo: On the Library of Congress site, I searched for the term Cincinnati German and limited my results to "Photo, Print, Drawing," like so:



The group of pictures was second in my search results. Not everything in the LOC catalog is digitized online, but luckily, these are. I knew to click on it because the streets in the description are the ones around the building.



We list more websites with databases of old photos here. Many state and local archives digitize photos for online memory projects, too.

You can learn more about finding, identifying and preserving old photos from our Photo Detective Collection, with study materials from photo historian Maureen A. Taylor and digital photography expert Nancy Hendrickson.


Libraries and Archives | Photos | Research Tips
Friday, July 12, 2013 11:11:44 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Genealogy News Corral, July 8-12
Posted by Diane

An online petition to release the 1921 Canadian census is circulating. You can read more about it and link to it on the Olive Tree Genealogy blog.


Canadian roots | Celebrity Roots | findmypast
Friday, July 12, 2013 10:18:57 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, July 11, 2013
Using Evernote to Organize My Genealogy Research
Posted by Diane

My former method of genealogy research organization was to email myself notes and records, or use notekeeping gadgets on my iGoogle page.

But with the emails getting buried in my in-box and the impending retirement of iGoogle, I wasn't very organized.

Then I started hearing more about the Evernote web clipper and note-taker, and we began planning an Evernote for genealogists webinar with Lisa Louise Cooke (it's July 25—more details below).

So I gradually started using it, like this:
  • I set up a Genealogy notebook "stack", and within that, notebooks for branches I'm researching.
  • When I need to put a record to request on my genealogy to-do list, I make a note in the appropriate notebook (usually I just copy and paste a catalog record and URL from a repository website) and tag it with the last name, the repository or website, and other relevant tag.

  • Next time I plan to visit some repository, or if I want to focus on a particular family, I can pull up all my notes with the right tags, and there's my to-do list.
  • If I'm away from home, I can add a note using the Evernote app on my phone. I can snap a picture of a record or photo and attach the image to my note.
Here's a peek at what it looks like. Everything in one place, and viewable from anywhere:



I'm feeling a lot less scattered, genealogy-wise, these days. I also use Evernote to keep my grocery list and save business cards, and it helped me get organized for our vacation last month. It's free, unless you need a LOT of storage.

I'm sure there's a lot more I could be using it for—sounds like you can share notes with other researchers and relatives, perform text-recognition of images to make them searchable, annotate images using something called Skitch, set up tables, and more.

So I'm looking forward to the webinar with Lisa. It's called Organize Your Research With Evernote, and it's on Thursday, July 25 at 7 p.m. ET (that's 6 p.m. CT, 5 p.m. MT, 4 p.m. PT).

And you can save $10 if you register now (this early registration offer expires July 18).


Genealogy Apps | Research Tips | Webinars
Thursday, July 11, 2013 10:25:32 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Tuesday, July 09, 2013
Keys to Creating a Great Family Tree Website
Posted by Diane

Do you want to share your genealogy research and connect with cousins through a family history website? Or maybe you want to improve the genealogy website you already have.  

The best family tree websites share these key elements, says Nancy Henrickson, adviser for Family Tree University's Make a Free Family Website in One Week online workshop:
  • Focus
  • Organization
  • Adherence to best practices
  • Consistent updating
To make sure your site is on track in these areas, Nancy suggests asking yourself these questions:

Focus

  • Is the site about a single surname or everyone you're researching?
  • Will you include images?
  • Is it clear to site visitors what the site is about?
  • Is this a research-based site?
  • Do you know the goal of this site?
Organization
  • Have you created logical categories for your posts?
  • Is the site easy to navigate?
  • Have you made it easy for people find out how to contact you?
  • Have you thought about how to organize data?
  • Will you have a photo gallery?
Best Practices
  • Is information presented in small bites vs. large areas of text?
  • Have you added ALT tags to your images?
  • Have you clearly titled each post?
  • Have you selected well-defined tags for each post?
Consistent Updating
  • Do you update your site at least once a week?
  • Do you have a plan for what you'll post? Optimized Images
  • Are your images resized at 72dpi?
  • Are your images in .jpg format?
  • Have you cropped images to highlight the important areas?
In the Make a Free Family Website in One Week online workshop (July 24-31), you'll watch video classes and receive guidance from Nancy. By the end of the workshop, you'll have built a basic genealogy website. Find out more on FamilyTreeUniversity.com.


Editor's Pick | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Web Sites | Tech Advice
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:52:45 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Watch a Preview of "Who Do You Think You Are?" on TLC
Posted by Diane

Excited for the fourth season of "Who Do You Think You Are?" premiering July 23 on TLC? Here's a video preview.

It's longer than the teaser that was released at the end of June, and drops clues to the family history surprises in store for some of the celebrity guests. You'll see them in the video: Kelly Clarkson, Zooey Deschanel, Chris O'Donnell, Christina Applegate, Jim Parsons, Cindy Crawford, Trisha Yearwood and Chelsea Handler. (We posted here about who these people are.) 



"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Celebrity Roots | Videos
Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:23:45 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, July 05, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, July 1-5
Posted by Diane

  • You can search for Oregon ancestors in the digital archive at Historical Oregon Newspapers. The newspapers come from more than 20 Oregon cities and date between 1848 and 1922. Search all the papers on the home page, or click the Search tab to run an advanced search. You can click a city on the Oregon map to browse papers from there.

    The site is part of the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program, and you'll also find these papers digitized on the Library of Congress' Chronicling America website.


FamilySearch | Newspapers
Friday, July 05, 2013 1:27:53 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Find American Revolution Ancestors in SAR Applications, Free Through July 7 on Ancestry.com
Posted by Diane

Researching ancestors who fought in the American Revolution? Ancestry.com has made its collection of Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications free through July 7.

The collection has 145,000 applications for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) lineage society, based in Louisville, Ky., that were approved between 1889 and Dec. 31, 1970.

Applications contains pedigrees and supporting genealogy information that the applicant used to prove a relationship to an ancestor who supported the cause of American Independence between 1775 and 1783. The supporting information could include church records, Revolutionary War pension documents, court records, deeds and more.

You can search for anyone named in an application—the applicant, the Patriot, or anyone who links the two. You also could search for a SAR member number.

Note that the database doesn't contain data on every man who fought in the American Revolution—only on those named in SAR applications approved from 1889 to 1970.

Click here to search Ancestry.com's SAR membership applications. You'll need to register for a free Ancestry.com account to view records.


Ancestry.com | Military records
Friday, July 05, 2013 9:05:07 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, July 02, 2013
Putting It All Together: The Write Your Family History Value Pack
Posted by Diane

I've been doing genealogy research since I started at the magazine 10 years ago (in more earnest in recent years). Lately as I update my family tree, I have this niggling thought: How do I put it all together?



I don't want to just record family history. I want to package it all up in words and pictures, to both summarize and detail my ancestors' lives, and make it easy for people to see all those connections and family events.

This is a comment I've heard in one form or another from many of you. Here's something that might help: Our Write Your Family History Value Pack. It has articles and tools that'll help you carry out a family history writing project, big or small, from start to finish. This value pack includes:
  • Writing Your Family Memoir independent study course from Family Tree University
  • Seven Tips to Write Your Family History article download
  • Personal Historian 2 software on CD
  • Writing Life Stories book download
Learn more about each of these components here. Buying them together in the Write Your Family History Value Pack saves you 66 percent!

The Write Your Family History Value Pack also comes with 25 percent off an instructor-guided Family Tree University course (such as Write Your Family History: Create a Captivating Record of Your Family’s Story or Creating a Family History Book: Guidance for Assembling and Printing a Family Keepsake).

saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Tuesday, July 02, 2013 1:40:01 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
Did You Know ... ?: Declaration of Independence Edition
Posted by Diane

Like any group effort, the writing and adoption of the Declaration of Independence involved some give-and-take and even drama.



These seven facts relay some of the Declaration's back story:
  • The youngest signatory was 26-year-old Edward Rutledge, who was initially opposed to independence from Britain, but voted to adopt for the sake of unanimity. He later was captured by the British but eventually released. Good old Benjamin Franklin was the oldest, at 70.

  • Signatory Richard Stockton also was captured by the British and recanted his signature under duress. 
  • In his first draft of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, a slave owner, included slavery among his list of grievances against King George of England:
"He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life & liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere"
This grievance was edited out at the request of delegates from South Carolina. This Wikipedia article discusses how rebuttals challenged the document's "all men are created equal" claims and the impact on American slavery.
  • In what might resemble a writer's worst nightmare, the members of the Continental Congress spent two days editing Jefferson's draft of the Declaration of Independence. He sent copies to several friends with changes indicated, and Henry Lee consoled him, "I wish sincerely, as well for the honor of Congress, as for that of the States, that the Manuscript had not been mangled as it is."

  • Whether the Declaration was signed on July 4 is up for debate. The version of events generally accepted by historians is that Congress adopted the Declaration on July 4 and its president, John Hancock, signed, along with his secretary. On July 19, a handwritten copy was produced to bear all the delegates' signatures; most signed Aug. 2. The Library of Congress website shows all this on a timeline for you.
  • Gen. George Washington read the Declaration of Independence to his troops in New York City on July 9. Soon after, they destroyed the statue of King George III at the foot of Broadway and used the lead to make musket balls.

  • Of the 200 broadsides John Dunlap of Philadelphia printed on the night of July 4, 1776, 26 are known to survive. One was the flea market find of a lifetime: In 1989, a shopper discovered the broadside behind a framed painting he bought for $4. In 2000, it went for $8.14 million at auction.

Learn even more about the Declaration of Independence at the National Archives Charters of Freedom exhibit.

Let genealogy expert and "Who Do You Think You Are?" researcher D. Joshua Taylor help you find your Patriot ancestors in our Researching Revolutionary War Ancestors video course.


NARA | Social History
Tuesday, July 02, 2013 11:51:34 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]