Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
September, 2014 (10)
August, 2014 (18)
July, 2014 (16)
June, 2014 (18)
May, 2014 (17)
April, 2014 (17)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<April 2013>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
31123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829301234
567891011

More Links








# Tuesday, April 09, 2013
Genealogy Video Tip: Finding Old Land Records in Illinois
Posted by Diane

Our Secrets to Beat Your Illinois Brick Walls webinar Thursday evening, April 11, picks up where our Illinois Genealogy Crash Course left off, introducing you to more-advanced, lesser-known genealogy resources ito trace ancestors in Illinois.

In this video tip from the Secrets to Beat Your Illinois Brick Walls webinar, presenter David A. Fryxell gives you resources for finding land records in Illinois, from the days of French, then British, then Virginia jurisdiction, through the public domain lands era, to more-recent deed records.
 


You've still got a couple more days to register for the Secrets to Beat Your Illinois Brick Walls webinar! Learn more about the webinar and sign up at ShopFamilyTree.com.


Land records | Research Tips | Videos | Webinars
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 2:55:20 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Intro to Genetic Genealogy Testing Crash Course
Posted by Diane

Is a DNA test the answer to your genealogy prayers or a waste of money? Well, it depends on the test you take and how you use the results. Blaine Bettinger, aka The Genetic Genealogist, will help you understand how to use genetic genealogy as part of your family history research in our Intro to DNA Crash Course webinar on April 25.



If you've:
  • considered taking a DNA ancestry test
  • been overwhelmed by the options for genetic genealogy tests to take and testing companies to use
  • wondered about the differences among Y-DNA, mtDNA and autosomal tests
  • thought that genetic genealogy probably isn't worth it for your research, anyway
  • taken a test and been unsure what to do with your results
... this webinar is for you.

Participants in the Intro to DNA Crash Course webinar will be able to ask their genetic genealogy questions in a Q&A session during the webinar. They'll get a copy of the webinar slides, access to watch the webinar again as often as desired, and our genetic-genealogy guide Research Strategies: Going Beyond Surnames.

Here are the webinar details:
  • Date: Thursday, April 25
  • Starting time: 7pm EST/6pm CST/5pm MST/4pm PST
  • Duration: 1 hour
  • Price: $49.99 (sign up by April 18 to save $10!)
Register for the Intro to DNA Crash Course webinar here.

Genetic Genealogy
Tuesday, April 09, 2013 2:11:28 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, April 05, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, April 1-5
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch has added 23.9 million indexed records and images to the free FamilySearch.org, with new browsable image collections from Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, England, Italy, Mexico and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 19.2 million document images from the new collection United Kingdom, WWI Service Records 1914-1920; 2 million index records from the collection US WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918; and almost the 931,000 index records from the collection US New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1925-1942. Search or browse these databases from the chart here.

  • In case you missed it (and were wondering), Irish genealogy research company Eneclann has researched Tom Cruise’s roots. The actor's real last name is Mapother, but Cruise actually is a family name. His great-grandfather, born in 1876 to Mary Pauline Russell Cruise and her second husband Thomas O’Mara, took the surname of his half-siblings and thus became Thomas Cruise Mapother I. Read more and download a copy of the family tree here.


Celebrity Roots | FamilySearch | Genealogy societies | Genetic Genealogy | German roots | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Friday, April 05, 2013 1:44:27 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, April 04, 2013
10 Tips for Researching Genealogy in Court Records
Posted by Diane

I'm pretty excited about our new Mastering Genealogy Research in Court Records course from Family Tree University. I've found this to be one of the most intimidating areas of genealogy research, but also one of the most rewarding—my court records finds have included an ancestral divorce filing in Texas and a revealing divorce case in Kentucky.



Mastering Genealogy Research in Court Records instructor Sunny Jane Morton shared these tips for a productive visit to the courthouse (and why you might not need to make a special trip to the courthouse, after all). The first session of this class starts April 8, and if you want to register, you can use code FTU0413 to save 20%.
  •  If you're traveling to a courthouse or another repository to research county-level records, download and fill out a Research Repository Checklist. It'll help you plan your visit, bring appropriate materials and leave extra stuff behind. Bring this checklist with you to the courthouse, along with a County Research Resources worksheet (available to course participants) listing which office has which types of records and what records you’re looking for.

  • Arrive as early as possible in the workday. You never know how much time your research will take.

  • Dress professionally but in comfortable, washable clothes. You may be on your feet a lot of the day in tight, hard-to-reach or dusty spaces. Yet, you'll get the respect you deserve as a researcher when you look presentable.

  •  Carry a minimum of materials with you. There probably won't be a secure place to set up a laptop computer or table space where you can spread out your notes.

  • Confirm copying policies ahead of time. You may be permitted to use a wand scanner or the digital camera on your phone, or you may have to buy a copy card. Some places permit only taking notes.

  • When you need to ask the staff a question, think of the most direct way to ask. Don’t share your family history. Say, “Where would I look for an index to probates or intestate proceedings for 1912?”, not “My great-grandfather died in 1912 in Chester Township and I think my great-grandmother was the executor of the estate….”

  • Be observant. In addition to the records you came for, keep an eye out for clues to other court records about your family.

  • Be thorough. If you don’t find what you expect to, ask a clerk a specific question. “Where else other than deed books might I find someone disposing of land between 1843 and 1846?” You might be shown a separate book of sheriff’s sales if your ancestor fell behind on taxes.

  •  If you can’t find what you’re looking for, ask politely whether someone in the county offices has a lot of experience with the historical records. If that person is available, he or she may be able to tell you whether an ancestor could have married by banns, or how likely it was that African-Americans would've had their deaths reported or estates filed during the Jim Crow years.

  • Finally, not every court record requires a trip to the courthouse. You might discover that records you need are microfilmed or digitized at the state archives or FamilySearch.org. In some cases, a combination of online research, microfilm rental and requesting copies from the courthouse will suffice.



court records | Family Tree University | Research Tips
Thursday, April 04, 2013 9:25:57 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Tuesday, April 02, 2013
Insider Secrets & Unique Records for Genealogy Research in Illinois
Posted by Diane

Hit a brick wall in your genealogy research into your Illinois ancestors? Or you just need a little push beyond basic records to take your family tree to the next level?

We're about to introduce you to sources that can help you dig deeper into your Land of Lincoln family tree.



In our Insider Secrets to Beat Your Illinois Brick Walls webinar, Family Tree Magazine's founding editor David A. Fryxell will 
  • take you on a tour of unique record sets including court records, tax records, military rosters and more.
  • show you how to navigate the Illinois State Archives
  • share resources for cluster and collateral searches in Illinois
  • offer advice on the  Illinois research problems from webinar attendees (submit questions in advance or during the webinar)
Plus, webinar participants will receive Family Tree Magazine's newly revised Illinois State Research Guide and our Chicago City Guide. Participants also get a PDF of the presentation slides and access to view the recording again as often as desired.

Click here for more information about the Insider Secrets to Beat Your Illinois Brick Walls webinar. Register on or before April 8 to save $10!

Update: Webinar registrants also can save $15 on our State Research Guides CD or eBook, with guides to researching genealogy in every US State.

Editor's Pick | Webinars
Tuesday, April 02, 2013 1:49:21 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Civil War Confederate Records Free on Fold3 in April
Posted by Diane

Got Southern ancestors? Military records website Fold3 has announced that to commemorate Confederate History Month, it's offering free access to all of its Confederate records for the entire month of April.

Those free records include:
  • Confederate soldier service records
  • Southern Claims Commission records: claims filed by Southern citizens for property seized by Union troops
  • Confederate Amnesty Papers: Confederates' applications for pardon to President Andrew Johnson
  • Confederate Citizens File: claims filed with the Confederate government by Southern citizens
  • Union Citizens File: Union Army records of provost court papers, orders, passes, paroles, claims for compensation, etc.
  • Civil War subversion investigations
  • Confederate Casualty Reports
  • Confederate Navy Subject File: papers including paymasters' vouchers relating to ships, personnel and more
You'll need to register for a free Fold3 account in order to view the records. Start searching Fold3's Confederate records collection here.


Civil War | Military records
Tuesday, April 02, 2013 1:02:54 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Friday, March 29, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, March 25-29
Posted by Diane

There's lots of free stuff in this week's genealogy news roundup:
  • Do you love finding out about people's heirlooms? Were you one of the thousands of people to attend the "Antiques Roadshow" taping in Cincinnati last summer? I was! The three episodes filmed here will be broadcast Mondays April 1, April 8 and April 15, at 8/7 central on PBS. 
  • More Cincinnati news: The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County genealogy department has added two more volumes of its Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps to its free Virtual Library. Volumes 7 and 8, which cover Norwood and eastern neighborhoods in 1917, conclude the set that staff began digitizing four years ago. I've already made a note in my research log to dig further into this collection. View the maps here.



Get research tips for solving your genealogy brick walls in our weeklong workshop Genealogy Brick Wall Busters: Tips and Advice to Overcome Your Genealogy Brick Walls, April 19-26.


Family Heirlooms | Free Databases | Libraries and Archives | NARA | UK and Irish roots
Friday, March 29, 2013 10:02:47 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, March 28, 2013
History at Your Fingertips
Posted by Diane

Did you know that your California Gold Rush ancestors from the East Coast traveled around six months and spent about $200 to make the trip?

That the city of Vicksburg, Miss., didn't celebrate Independence Day from 1863, when residents surrendered on July 4 after a 47-day Union siege, until 1945?

That during the Oklahoma Land Rush of April 22, 1889, two cities of 10,000 residents each (Oklahoma City and Guthrie) sprang up in less than a day?

The Genealogist's U.S. History Pocket Reference by Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Nancy Hendrickson delivers fascinating facts such as these, plus timelines, charts (one, for example, summarizes the dates, causes and outcomes of the major Indian wars), maps, important dates (including censuses), and lists of popular foods, books, music and trends. It encapsulates historical phenomena you might need a refresher on, such as the Triangle Trade and Bleeding Kansas. 

An awareness of the events your ancestors witnessed can unlock records in your family history research and provide context for the records you've already discovered.

This conveniently sized book is chronologically organized into historical eras for easy browsing of the time periods important to your genealogy research—and to your understanding of your ancestors' lives.

Learn more about The Genealogist's U.S. History Pocket Reference in ShopFamilyTree.com.


Genealogy books | Research Tips | Social History
Thursday, March 28, 2013 8:26:00 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Archives.com Launches Millions of Lutheran Church Records
Posted by Diane

Subscription genealogy site Archives.com has released its collection of Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) birth, marriage and death records, which genealogists have been anticipating since Archives.com announced the digitization project nearly a year ago.

The collections, appearing online for the first time, total nearly 4.6 million records from about 1,000 rolls of microfilm. The records date from the mid-1800s through 1940 and include births, baptisms, confirmations, marriages, deaths, and burials.

You usually have to know which church your ancestors attended in order to request the record from the church or find it on microfilm. Because these ELCA records are indexed by name, though, you don't have to know the church before you start your search.

Details in the records vary by church, but they often include parents' names, dates and places of the event, and other biographical details. Many of the churches has concentrations of immigrants from Norway, Sweden or Germany as members—so the records could be the key you need to start researching ancestors in Europe.

You'll learn how to find additional records of Lutheran ancestors—including congregational histories, communion lists, synod publications and more—from our guide Religious Records: Researching Lutheran Ancestors, available in ShopFamilyTree.com. 


Archives.com | Church records
Tuesday, March 26, 2013 2:02:42 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Monday, March 25, 2013
Genealogy Records for "Hearing" Your Revolutionary War Ancestors' Voices
Posted by Diane

Did your ancestors fight in or witness the Revolutionary War firsthand? Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Maureen A. Taylor shares the records she's found especially helpful in doing research for her forthcoming documentary "Revolutionary Voices: A Last Muster Film," a project with award-winning documentary producers Verissima Productions:
  • Diaries and letters: This is Eleazer Blake, an apprentice in a wheelwright shop in Rindge, NH, who kept a diary.


In his diary, he mentions the Battle of Lexington and Concord as well as details of his everyday life. These statements let you relive parts of his life. Though your Revolutionary War-era ancestor may not have been a diarist, the writings of his contemporaries will help you understand the tense times he lived in.
  • Pension applications: While some men exaggerated their wartime exploits in their Revolutionary War pension applications, other documents make for painful reading. James Allen Jr. of Maine applied for a pension several times, but lacked proof of his service. Allen’s brother submitted a deposition with a plea on his brother’s behalf: “I have no doubt my brother served in the Army of the Revolution as he has always stated to me, and I know that he has for the last 20 years or more been trying to obtain a pension.” (The November 2008 Family Tree Magazine has online resources for pension and other military records, as does our Family Tree University course US Military Records: Trace Your Ancestor's Service.)
  • Memoirs: Seneca chief Chainbreaker, also known as Gov. Blacksnake or Tash-won-ne-ah, dictated his life story to a neighbor, relating how he served for the British in the bloody Battle of Oriskany in New York. George Avery wrote in his memoir that being taken prisoner at Royalton, Vt., in 1780 was a turning point. “I felt the evil of my life and the Divine Justice of Providence.” Use WorldCat, which includes the National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections (1986 and later), to help you find published and unpublished memoirs in library collections.
Don't forget about women of the Revolutionary era: They left behind personal writings, pension documents and memoirs as well. The stories of their lives as daughters, wives and widows can also be found in materials left by their fathers, brothers and husbands. (Family Tree Magazine's Ultimate Tracing Female Ancestors Collection can help you learn more about the women in your family tree.)

You can hear more life stories about the Revolutionary War generation by following Maureen's Revolutionary Voices: A Last Muster Film project. Find out how you can help make the film happen here.


Female ancestors | Military records | Research Tips | Social History
Monday, March 25, 2013 8:23:48 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]