Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
April, 2014 (12)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<March 2013>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
242526272812
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

More Links








# Monday, March 04, 2013
Sharing Stories of Heirlooms—Old and New
Posted by Diane

When it comes to preserving and sharing the stories of family heirlooms (something we talk a lot about here at Family Tree Magazine) I think it's important to log not only antiques that have been in your family for generations, but also newer objects you hope will become heirlooms.

That's why, as part of the Heirloom Registry Scavenger Hunt, I registered my childhood rocking chair in Houstory's Heirloom Registry.



The registry is a site where you can keep a log of your family heirlooms. You affix an Heirloom Registry sticker to an inconspicuous spot on each item, and your descendants can use the code on the sticker to look up what you had to say about that object.



This chair is something I played with, and I hope my daughter Norah will play with it. Santa (aka Mom and Dad) gave it to my two older sisters and me when I was about 18 months old, which would have been in 1975. My mom says that I "kind of took over ownership." This makes me feel better about my sisters always hiding my dolls and calling shotgun first when we were kids.

I  considered posting a photo of myself sitting in the chair, but the only one we have is a diaper shot. So instead I offer this:



Yes, I get to kiss those chubby almost-4-month-old cheeks every day.

Even if you don't want to register your family heirlooms online, pleasepleaseplease write down information about them (you can use the free downloadable Heirloom Inventory on FamilyTreeMagazine.com) and share copies with loved ones. Please.

Now for the scavenger hunt fun! 
  • If you’d like to start the scavenger hunt now, go to The Houstory Hearth blog’s special Scavenger Hunt Page. There you’ll find information about the hunt, the prizes, and the list of the other three blogs you’ll need to visit today.
  • If you already know what you’re doing, here’s the Heirloom Registry ID Code you need to obtain my secret word: CEFD-304-562-5138-2011
  • If this is your final stop for Hunt No. 1, be sure to submit your entry form with your secret words before Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at midnight PST. Instructions for Hunt No. 2, which starts on March 6, will be posted at the Houstory Hearth blog at 12 a.m. EST on March 6. Good luck—and happy hunting!
 


Family Heirlooms | Genealogy fun | saving and sharing family history
Monday, March 04, 2013 11:15:32 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Family Photo Detective Book Winner!
Posted by Diane

Congratulations to the lucky winner of our Family Photo Detective book sweepstakes: Patti Wier of Artesia, NM!

She'll receive a copy of the hot-off-the-presses Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries by Maureen A. Taylor.



Patti will be able to take advantage of Maureen's advice for using clothing, backgrounds, props and photographer imprints to learn more about who's in her old family photographs. Blending this type of photo research with research in genealogy records is a great strategy for discovering details about your ancestors.

Family Photo Detective is available at booksellers including ShopFamilyTree.com.

Genealogy books | Genealogy fun | Photos
Monday, March 04, 2013 9:24:38 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, March 01, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, Feb. 25-March 1
Posted by Diane

  • The new Legacies of British Slave Ownership database holds the names of 46,000 slave owners in British colonies who received compensation for the loss of "property" when Britain abolished slavery in 1833 (it outlawed the trade in 1807). The database doesn't name slaves, but it could aid those who are tracing African ancestors by researching the slave-owning families. Search the database here
  • The Civil War Trust's annual Park Day takes place Saturday, April 16 at more than 100 participating battlefields in 24 states. Volunteers help clean and maintain these important Civil War sites by raking leaves, picking up trash, painting signs, clearing trails and more. To learn how you can help, visit the trust's Park Day page and click on the name of the participating Civil War site you're interested in (note that some sites are holding their volunteer events on alternate dates).
... and don't forget about the Heirloom Registry Online Scavenger Hunt taking place next week. Have a good weekend!


African-American roots | Civil War | Historic preservation | Italian roots | UK and Irish roots
Friday, March 01, 2013 11:05:04 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 28, 2013
Go on a Scavenger Hunt for Family Heirlooms (and Maybe Win Prizes)!
Posted by Diane

You might've seen the news about the Heirloom Registry Scavenger Hunt that the folks over at Houstory have put together for next week.



I love how it will encourage genealogists to record and share the stories behind their family heirlooms, so I'm happy to be part of it. Plus, you can win a bunch of prizes, including our Family Tree Magazine 2012 Annual CD; How to Archive Family Keepsakes from the Family Curator herself, Denise Levenick; Preserving Your Family Photographs from Photo Detective Maureen A. Taylor, and more.

Scavenger hunt days are March 4, 6 and 8, with a prize awarded each day plus a grand prize at the end.

To go on the hunt, you'll need to visit four blogs on their designated hunt day—that's Monday, March 4 for this Genealogy Insider blog. Click here to see the list of all four blogs you need to visit on Monday.

Each blogger will post about an heirloom he or she has logged in Houstory's Heirloom Registry. The post will provide that item's registry code. After you visit each blog, you'll go to the Heirloom Registry website, look up the heirloom using the registry code, view the Registry Certificate for that item, and find a secret code word. Then you'll include the code words from the four blogs on the entry form you can link to from this page.

You'll find all the Heirloom Registry Scavenger Hunt instructions here, and you also can get updates by following Houstory on Facebook and Twitter (#HoustoryHunt).

So I'll see you back here on Monday for the Heirloom Registry Scavenger Hunt, and I'll share a little about one of my favorite family heirlooms. 

Family Heirlooms | Genealogy fun | saving and sharing family history
Thursday, February 28, 2013 2:51:05 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Researchers' Favorite Genealogy Books and History-Related Reads
Posted by Diane

Last weekend's Family Tree University Virtual Genealogy Conference was informative, inspirational and just plain fun. Over the next few weeks, I'll share some tips I picked up from the live chats. (And I'll keep you posted on the next Virtual Genealogy Conference, scheduled for September.)

The genealogy books chat made me plan a trip to the library and start surfing Amazon.com: A bunch of conference attendees got together and talked about their go-to genealogy reference books and favorite history-related reads, including those below (for books we carry in ShopFamilyTree.com, I've linked to the listing):
  • Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills

  • The Family Tree Sourcebook by the editors of Family Tree Magazine

  • The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy edited by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking

  • How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick

  • A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Female Ancestors by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack

  • Women and the Law of Property in Early America by Marylynn Salmon ("helps when looking at court records and understanding how women were treating in regards to their rights to own property," said the chatter, and it covers "1750 to 1830ish")

  • Finding Your Father's War by Jonathan Gawne ("for researching WWII soldiers")

  • Everyday Life in the 1800s by Marc McCutcheon

  • The Family Tree Problem Solver by Marsha Hoffman Rising ("the perfect book for when you're stuck on a line and need inspiration"), which also comes in a digital version

  • Reading Early American Handwriting by Kip Sperry ("the first part explains about the differences in writing styles, while the last three-quarters of the book has examples of documents with the transcriptions")

  • Genealogists Handbook for New England Research edited by Michael J. LeClerc

  • The Genealogist's Companion and Sourcebook and The Sleuthbook for Genealogists by Emily Anne Croom

  • Finding Indiana Ancestors by M. Teresa Baer and Geneil Breeze

  • Bringing Your Family History to Life Through Social History by Katherine Scott Sturdevant

  • Black's Law Dictionary, 4th edition ("the 4th edition is the most recent one that still has the old terms, as I understand")

  • No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting by Anne MacDonald, recommended by a chatter who is into knitting

  • Your Digital Afterlife....When Facebook, Flickr, and Twitter Are Your Estate, What's Your Legacy? by Evan Carroll and John Romano

  • Norwegians on the Prairie by Odd Lovoll

  • Italian Genealogical Records: How to use Italian Civil, Ecclesiastical and Other Records in Family History Research by Trafford Cole

  • Only a Few Bones by John Philip Colletta

  • Finding Italian Roots by John Philip Colletta

  • The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England ("written like a travel guide for people traveling from today back in time to the 14th century")

  • Annie's Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret by Steve Luxenberg

  • The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy by Val D. Greenwood
Would you add any books to this list? Click Comments below and let us know!


Family Tree University | Genealogy books | Genealogy Events
Thursday, February 28, 2013 9:29:32 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [5]
# Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Photo Detective to Uncover Stories of Revolutionary Generation in New Film
Posted by Diane

Family Tree Magazine's Photo Detective, Maureen A. Taylor, is turning her books The Last Muster: Images of the Revolution and the forthcoming The Last Muster: Faces of the Revolution into a film that breathes life into the long-ago Revolutionary War era.

Maureen has discovered and authenticated more than 200 photos of Americans who witnessed the Revolutionary War and survived into the age of photography. "Ten years ago, I was presented with an old photograph and asked to analyze it," she says. "Suddenly, I realized that I was looking into the face of someone who was a young adult during the Revolutionary War."

In "Revolutionary Voices: A Last Muster Film," you'll follow Maureen as she searches for genealogical records of those folks, locates places where they lived and interviews their descendants. See some of those photos and hear about one man in particular, Eleazer Blake, in this video:



Maureen and documentary producers Verissima Productions are raising funds for the project through Kickstarter.com. You can learn more about the "Revolutionary Voices" film and pledge to support it here.


Military records | Photos
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 4:27:30 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Learn How to Interpret German Genealogy Records
Posted by Diane

You're looking for genealogy records of your ancestors in Germany, and perhaps you've even found some. They might look like this:



And it makes you understand why everyone talks about how hard it is to understand German records: Not only are you dealing with an unfamiliar language, but the script makes the words difficult to interpret.

Most German Catholic church records are in Latin; Evangelical (Lutheran) records may be in Latin or German. Records as late as the 1930s are usually written in the old German Gothic script.

But there are tricks you can use to figure out what these church records say about your German ancestors.

Our March 14 webinar, Interpreting German Records, will teach you how to work with German genealogy records, from basic translation to decoding hard-to-read handwriting and typeface. German genealogy expert James M. Beidler will show you
  • tricks for reading German script and type
  • resources for building your vocabulary of German terms and deciphering abbreviations
  • a methodology for solving the quirks of the printed Gothic/Fraktur typeface
  • strategies for transcribing and translating the handwritten German cursive script
The Interpreting German Records webinar takes place Thursday, March 14, at 7 p.m. Eastern Time (that's 6 p.m. Central, 5 p.m. Mountain and 4 p.m. Pacific). You'll save $10 on your registration if you sign up before March 7!

Family Tree University | German roots | Webinars
Wednesday, February 27, 2013 10:23:54 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, February 26, 2013
Rumors Fly: Kelly Clarkson Filming "Who Do You Think You Are?" for TLC
Posted by Diane

Genealogy blogger Dick Eastman spotted an online report that the cable network TLC (The Learning Channel) will pick up the US series "Who Do You Think You Are?," which NBC cancelled after last season.

According to the report on the Taste of Country website, NashvilleGab.com announced that singer and "American Idol" Season 1 champ Kelly Clarkson is filming an episode of the genealogy series.

NashvilleGab.com referenced mjsbigblog (taglined "American Idol—I love This Cheesy Show), which in turn cited a tweet from a man who met Clarkson in Andersonville, Ga., as well as a brief report from that town's paper.

I hope these folks are right! Rumors of TLC's interest in the series circulated last year, and I think it's a great way for the channel to redeem itself after "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo."


Celebrity Roots | Genealogy Industry
Tuesday, February 26, 2013 9:41:56 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Friday, February 22, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, Feb. 18-22
Posted by Diane

  • Ancestry.com has opened its AncestryDNA test to all US residents. From last May until now, the test was open just to Ancestry.com subscribers. This autosomal test analyzes more than 700,000 DNA marker locations and cross-references them with Ancestry.com's catalog of DNA samples.

    The AncestryDNA test also breaks down your ethnic heritage by percentage from 20 populations. See the September 2012 Family Tree Magazine for The Genetic Genealogist blogger Blaine Bettinger's take on the AncestryDNA test.
  • Planning that long-awaited trip to the Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City? Take note that the library will change its Saturday hours in April. Beginning April 13, the FHL's Saturday operating hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (current Saturday hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.).  “This change is being made so that valuable staff and volunteer resources can be allocated to other busier times during the week that have greater patron demand,” says library director Don Anderson.


Ancestry.com | FamilySearch | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | Genetic Genealogy | Libraries and Archives
Friday, February 22, 2013 1:49:29 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Jump-Start Your African-American Genealogy
Posted by Diane

As we enter the last week of Black History month, I wanted to make sure those researching African-American roots know about this new Value Pack of genealogy tools:  our Jump Start Your African-American Genealogy Value Pack.

Slavery and segregation present unique obstacles to tracing African-American family history—but finding those roots isn't always impossible.

The books, articles and classes in this new value pack will help you formulate strategies and uncover sources to help you deal with brick walls in African-American genealogy research. You'll also learn about resources that exist just for African-American ancestors.

The Jump Start Your African-American Genealogy Value Pack contains:
  • Find Your African-American Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Best African-American Genealogy Sources article download
  • Best African American Genealogy Websites half-hour video class
  • Reconstruction 101 for African-Americans half-hour video class 
Getting all these resources in one Value Pack means they're yours for just $29.99 (instead of $75-plus).

Click here for more details on the Jump Start Your African-American Genealogy Value Pack.


African-American roots | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Wednesday, February 20, 2013 3:32:01 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]