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# Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Family Tree Firsts Blogger Entries Due Friday
Posted by Beth



Just a friendly reminder that if you're a newbie genealogist, you could be Family Tree Magazine's next Family Tree Firsts blogger!

We're looking for someone who enjoys writing and is interested in his or her family history, but is just starting—or hasn't yet started—to research it.

We'll select one winner based on the strength of the application. Over the course of six months, you'll have access to Family Tree Magazine's how-to genealogy products, Family Tree University classes and webinars, as well as other products, services and surprises from our partners. You'll blog once a week to share your genealogical finds, trials and tribulations. We might even include you in a future issue of the magazine!

To enter, click here to fill out an application and compose your first blog post. This will let us get to know you and see how you'd write your blog. But, hurry! The deadline is Friday, Nov. 16. Good luck!


Family Tree Firsts | saving and sharing family history
Tuesday, November 13, 2012 11:25:12 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, November 12, 2012
Document the Lives of Your Military Ancestors
Posted by Beth





Celebrate your ancestors who served in the military or lived through historical conflicts by exploring and documenting their lives. With the Military Research Value Pack, you'll get easy-to-use tools that will guide you through:
  • What records to look for—military or otherwise—and how to locate them
  • How to find and mine online records
  • Research tips and guidance for tracing ancestors' involvement in specific US wars and conflicts
You'll find that many types of military documents—from service to pension to land records—can reveal important information about your family tree, including soldiers' widows and children. Even ancestors who didn't serve might have left behind draft records.

___

And, a reminder:
There's still time to register for one (or more) of the 16 Family Tree University courses that begin today, including:
Use code FTU1112 and save 20 percent!


Editor's Pick | German roots | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Monday, November 12, 2012 10:26:09 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, November 09, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Nov. 5-9
Posted by Beth

  • The University of Indianapolis is teaming up with Ancestry.com in a first-of-its-kind initiative to encourage its students to explore and reflect on how their family history impacts their identity. All UIndy students, faculty and staff have been granted access to all Ancestry.com content available from computers and mobile devices anywhere on campus, as well as to on-campus identity workshops and seminars.


  • Family tree building wiki site WikiTree has released MatchBot, an automated matching tool that crawls the sites database checking for high-probability matches in the trees on the site. When it finds a match, it emails the tree managers with a match proposal. They can merge the profiles, create an "unmerged match" or reject the merge. Until now, members discovered such matches using traditional searches and the not-automated FindMatches tool.

  • In a new blog series on Ancestry.com, the family of Rob and Kathy Brown and their five children are embarking on a family history journey in an RV decorated with Ancestry.com branding. The Browns will travel for six to nine months and more than 10,000 miles, through 42 states and 40 major cities, discovering the stories of their ancestors and blogging along the way. Read blog posts in the Great Ancestry Adventure series here and check out photos on Facebook here.


 



Free Databases | NARA | Research Tips
Friday, November 09, 2012 9:36:34 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 08, 2012
The National Archives of Ireland Launches Genealogy Site
Posted by Beth

Researching your Irish roots? A new Irish online free resource is now available to aid your research.

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht in Ireland, has today formally launched The National Archives of Ireland's new genealogy-specific website. 

The following collections are now freely available on the site:
The census information links to the already established website, but the latter two are newly released today. The Tithe Applotment Books, in particular, are a major resource, being an early 19th century precursor to Griffith's Valuation; these are the actual images from the books.

Joining the site in near future:
  •  Calendars of Wills and Administrations (1858-1922)
  •  Nineteenth-century census survivals (1821-1851)
  •  Valuation Office House and Field Books (1848-1860)
  •  Census Search Forms for the 1841 and 1851 Censuses


Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites | UK and Irish roots
Thursday, November 08, 2012 10:26:51 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
Webinar Sneak Peek: Top 25 Tips for Finding Your Colonial Ancestors
Posted by Beth




Wherever your Colonial kin come from—Jamestown to Roanoke, Plymouth to Massachusetts Bay—you'll discover helpful strategies for researching them in our Tuesday, Nov. 13 hour-long webinar. Here's a sneak peek of this exclusive webinar. Don't miss out; register now! 

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 13
Starting Time: 7pm ET/6pm CT/5pm MT/4pm PT
Price: $49.99
Presenter: D. Joshua Taylor  
Topics:
  • Essential tricks for tracing colonial immigrants
  • A brief history of Colonial America, from the Revolutionary War to the Louisiana Purchase
  • New England, the Middle Colonies, Chesapeake Bay Colonies, the Lower South and the Frontier, including which ethnic groups settled which areas during this period
  • Key strategies for unearthing your early American roots
  • Common and lesser-known resources for records of your Colonial kin
  • Best Colonial genealogy websites and how they can help your genealogy research



Editor's Pick | Research Tips | Webinars
Thursday, November 08, 2012 9:14:22 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 07, 2012
Genealogy Site Mocavo Adds 17,000 Free, Searchable Yearbooks
Posted by Diane

Mocavo, a genealogy search engine and—since the September acquisition of digitization company ReadyMicro—a growing records site, is adding a free collection of about 17,000 high school and college yearbooks. The collection comprises nearly 3.5 million pages and stretching over 100 years of history.

Yearbooks not only give information about a student or school employee, but they also often pair those details with photos. You'll need to create a free Mocavo account in order to search the collection. Here's my search for a great-aunt who lived in Ohio:

Mocavo yearbook collection

Indexing was by optical character recognition (OCR). The search found a yearbook page containing my aunt's given name and surname, but in the names of different people:

Mocavo yearbook collection

If you scroll down on the yearbooks search page, you'll find an alphabetical list of schools included in the collection. Use the search box to filter the list by place:

Mocavo yearbook collection

You can click a yearbook title to search or browse within that book:

Mocavo yearbook collection

Read more about the Mocavo yearbook collection and see an infographic about it on the Mocavo blog.



Got early American ancestors? Our Nov. 13 webinar, Top 25 Tips for Finding Your Colonial Ancestors, will help you overcome the challenges of genealogy during this era. Click here to learn more!

Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites
Wednesday, November 07, 2012 1:00:06 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
Tips for Researching Your Ancestors' Military Records
Posted by Beth

Veterans Day is Sunday, Nov. 11, a time to honor those military men and women who have served our country.

Chances are strong that someone in your family was a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, guardsman or state militiaman. Even if you don't have irrefutable evidence of an ancestor's military service, make a timeline of wars he lived through; check for military records if his age made him eligible to enlist. And, don't assume your female ancestors didn't leave records: They may have served in WWII Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, for example.

Because military service was so common, you'll find lots of online resources—everything from huge, government-sponsored databases to a tiny town's WWI casualty list. Military records even encompass those who didn't serve in the armed forces; for example, after the Selective Service Act of 1917, 24 million men ages 18 to 45 filled out WWI draft registration cards between June 1917 and September 1918. Even if he didn't enlist, your ancestor's draft registration card is probably available at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).

To get started, check out these free military research articles from FamilyTreeMagazine.com:

And, ShopFamilyTree.com also offers military research resources:  

Did You Know?
Veterans Day originated as Armistice Day on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Seven years later, Congress passed a resolution for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday in 1938. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the holiday's name to Veterans Day as a way to honor those who served in all American wars.

Today's Veterans, By the Numbers
The US Census Bureau shares the following veteran statistics based on its 2011 American Community Survey findings:
  • 21.5 million military veterans
  • 9.2 million veterans ages 65 and older
  • 2.3 million black veterans
  • 1.6 million female veterans
When They Served
  • 7.5 million Vietnam-era veterans
  • 5.4 million peacetime-only veterans
  • 5.1 million Gulf War veterans (representing service from Aug. 2, 1990 to present)
  • 2.4 million Korean War veterans
  • 1.8 million World War II veterans



Military records | Research Tips
Wednesday, November 07, 2012 10:53:15 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, November 06, 2012
A Quick Take on US Voting
Posted by Beth

Hello! I'm Beth, former editor of Memory Makers magazine, and I'll be sharing genealogy-related information with you while Diane Haddad heads out on maternity leave until mid-January.

As you head to the polls to cast your vote today (unless you voted early, like me), it's a great time to appreciate your right as an American citizen. Not every American has had this privilege available in his or her lifetime.

Here's a quick look at the US voting timeline:
1789: Constitution empowers states to set voting rights; most enfranchise only male property owners age 21 and older
1830s: Property requirements begin to ease
1848: Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY, launches suffrage movement
1870: 15th Amendment extends voting rights to African-American men
1890: Wyoming allows women to vote
1920: 19th Amendment grants women's suffrage
1940: American Indians are recognized as citizens, although not all are allowed to vote until 1947
1964: 24th Amendment prohibits poll taxes
1965: Voting Rights Act protects minority voters
1971: 26th Amendment lowers voting age to 18

For more interesting tidbits on the history of US voting, see this article on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.

Wondering if your ancestors declared their political leanings?

  • Check with your ancestor's county board of elections, local library, town hall or historical society for information on old voter registration records in the area.
  • The Family History Library (FHL) may have town or county lists of registered voters or those who paid poll taxes. Search your ancestral state archives website for voting, and try running a keyword search of the FHL online catalog on the town, county or state name and the word voting.
  • Subscription website Ancestry.com has some voting-related records and digitized books, so if you're a member, run the same search of its online catalog.

Be sure your voice is among the 90 million Americans expected to cast their vote today!  


Ancestry.com | Family Tree Magazine articles | Public Records
Tuesday, November 06, 2012 8:31:06 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, November 05, 2012
Why Yes, It Is Possible To Do Genealogy Online for Free!
Posted by Diane

Free is such as nice word—and we're going to help you apply it to your online genealogy research in our next One-Week Workshop.

Using Free Genealogy Websites One-Week Workshop

Our Using Free Genealogy Websites weeklong online workshop, taking place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 7, will teach you how to make the most of free websites and services to help you discover your roots. You'll learn:
  • secrets to glean more ancestral information from free sites and databases
  • how to search the web more effectively
  • the best free online genealogy tools—including those you’re not already using
The workshop gives you access to nine pre-recorded video classes—including encore presentations of some of our best Virtual Genealogy Conference sessions—featuring on-screen demos of the recommended websites and strategies.

Classes cover topics such as powering up your web searches, how to find online historical books mentioning your family, searching the free Ellis Island passenger database, using online newspaper research tools and more.

You'll also participate in daily message board discussions to ask questions, exchange ideas and connect with other students and expert workshop staff.

You can participate at your convenience throughout the week: Watch one class per day or fit them all in over a long weekend, then immediately apply what you’ve learned to your genealogy research.

Regular tuition for the Using Free Genealogy Websites One-Week Workshop is $129.99. But you can save $35 by using code WORKSHOPEARLY at checkout. Just hurry, this special code expires Friday, Nov. 16.



Family Tree University | Free Databases | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Web Sites | Videos
Monday, November 05, 2012 9:57:54 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Friday, November 02, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Oct. 29-Nov. 2
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch has announced its US Immigration and Naturalization community indexing project is halfway to its goal of creating a free online collection of US passenger lists, border crossing records, naturalization records, and other immigration documents. Two months into the project, 85,000 volunteers have indexed more than 15 million records.

    FamilySearch hopes to have 30 million records indexed by the end of the year.  You can see what's been indexed so far and register to help out at FamilySearch.org/immigration.
  • According to Ancestry.com, actor George Clooney is Abraham Lincoln's half-first cousin five times removed through Lincoln's maternal grandmother, Nancy Hanks. Then men also share a home state of Kentucky: Clooney was born in Lexington; Lincoln, in Hardin County.

    Most genealogists understand such connections aren't really big news—with every generation, each of us has exponentially more cousins, and some of them are bound to be famous (others are bound to be deadbeats)—but writing this little blurb let me gaze at photos of George Clooney.
  • Speaking of making money doing genealogy, the Board for Certification of Genealogists is offering new video testimonials from professional researchers to help you decide if certification is right for you. The site also has posted an hour-long seminar about what you can expect from the certification process (and what's expected of you). 


Ancestry.com | Celebrity Roots | FamilySearch | Genealogy societies | immigration records
Friday, November 02, 2012 11:28:10 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]