Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
November, 2014 (16)
October, 2014 (20)
September, 2014 (17)
August, 2014 (18)
July, 2014 (16)
June, 2014 (18)
May, 2014 (17)
April, 2014 (17)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<June 2010>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
303112345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930123
45678910

More Links








# Friday, June 25, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: June 21-25
Posted by Diane

Thanks to the World Cup, you can once again access records on British genealogy site FindMyPast.co.uk free for a limited time this weekend. You’ll need to register for a free account by midnight June 26 for access between 9a.m. Sunday and 9a.m. Monday (note that these are UK times—midnight June 26 in the UK equals 7p.m. EST June 25, according to the World Time Converter, so you'll have to get a move on). Get details about this offer on FindMyPast.co.uk.

FamilySearch is starting new indexing projects for civil births in Jamaica (1878–1899); Arkansas WWII draft registrations (1942); Washington, DC, deaths (1874–1959); and North Carolina Freedmen Letters (1862–1870) from former slaves to the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. The indexes will eventually be searchable free on FamilySearch. To volunteer for any of these projects, visit FamilySearch Indexing.

Ancestry.com has announced its discovery that actor Robert Pattinson, star of the popular “Twilight Saga” vampire books and movies, is related to Vlad the Impaler (considered by some to be the inspiration for Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula) through the British royal family. Genea-Musings blogger Randy Seaver points out, though, that the company doesn’t specify the exact relationship, and that Pattinson’s link to British royals and their link to Vlad the Impaler doesn’t guarantee Pattinson is related to Vlad.


Ancestry.com | Celebrity Roots | FamilySearch | UK and Irish roots
Friday, June 25, 2010 2:37:14 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
See the world with Google Earth
Posted by Grace

We're putting together four new classes for the next session of Family Tree University, which starts July 21! Lisa Louise Cooke's new class Google Earth for Genealogists will show you how to use a powerful free program in your genealogy search. Here's a taste of what you'll learn:
Because land doesn't move, it's one of the few elements of our ancestors' lives that we can always count on. Consider an old photograph: Buildings may have changed but the surrounding landmarks such as hills, valleys and rock formations still stand today and can aid in identification.

Let's start using Google Earth by searching for an address that you probably have to get a feel for what I mean by this: the house where one of your sets of grandparents lived.
  1. In the Search panel type the address in the Fly To box and click the magnifying glass icon.
  2. The globe in the 3D viewer will start to turn and very quickly will zoom in to that location.
  3. Place a placemark on that location so you keep track of the exact spot by clicking the Placemark button in the Viewer Toolbar.
  4. When the New Placemark box opens, label the placemark with the exact street address and your grandparents' names.
  5. Click OK.
You have now located your first ancestral home on Google Earth. Great job! 
Learn more and sign up here

Family Tree University | Research Tips
Friday, June 25, 2010 12:49:02 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, June 24, 2010
Historical Photo Database Shows NYC's Lower East Side Tenements
Posted by Diane

The Tenement Museum in New York City’s Lower East has launched on online database of more than 1,300 images from the museum’s collection.



Photos show the neighborhood, historic and contemporary photographs of 97 Orchard Street (the restored tenement where the museum is located) and historic portraits of people who lived and worked there.

You can browse, run a basic search by keyword, or run an advanced search on a name, place, year range or other terms. If you click on an image in your search results, you can enlarge it or save it to your favorites (in which case you’ll need to create a free account).

By 1900, more than 80,000 tenements had been built in New York City, according to History.com. About 2.3 million people—two-thirds of the city’s population, many of them poor immigrants—lived in tenement housing. The building at 97 Orchard Street was home to 7,000 people from more than 20 nations between 1863 and 1935.

Author and photographer Jacob Riis exposed the miserable conditions of tenement houses in his book How the Other Half Lives, published in 1890. (Read it on Google Books). The book was instrumental in urban reforms regulating the construction of tenements.

Free Databases | Museums | Photos | Social History
Thursday, June 24, 2010 11:04:06 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
10 Reasons to Enroll in Family Tree University
Posted by Allison


Family Tree University is the only program that combines a friendly, accessible style of genealogy instruction—popularized by Family Tree Magazine—with a state-of-the-art online learning environment to make genealogy education rewarding and fun.

Whether you're a family history newbie or veteran researcher, here are 10 reasons to take a Family Tree University course:

1. Easy-to-follow lessons show you how to find and use genealogy resources. Too often, how-to seminars and articles tell you that resources are available to you, but don't explain how to actually use them or where to get them.

2. The content is developed by experts who know genealogy and frequently write and teach about their course topics. You benefit from the expertise of someone who's been there and has experiences to share.

3. Courses are designed specifically for people who do genealogy for fun. Our students are people who, like you, want to get more from their hobby. Family Tree University isn't for professionals seeking certification (although you will get a "diploma" for each course you complete!).

4. There's a course for every genealogist. Class topics cover everything from using different types of records to preserving and sharing your research—check out our complete course list. (Don't see the course you'd most like to take? Email us.)

5. You can go to class in your jammies. There's no set time you have to show up for class—you can log in at 3 in the afternoon or 3 in the morning, whatever's convenient to you. And there's no one else in the room to see your bedhead or bunny slippers.

6. Connect with other genealogists. Each course has a private message board just for the students and instructor, where you can bounce around ideas and share your challenges with other researchers just like you.

7. You'll become a better researcher. The time, effort and money you invest in taking a Family Tree University course will pay dividends by teaching you how to trace your ancestors more efficiently, confidently and cost-effectively.

8. See research tools and techniques in action. Some concepts are easier shown than told. Family Tree University courses integrate photos, screen shots and even video demos into the lessons to enhance your learning experience.

9. You can save class materials for future reference. Each lesson and reading assignment is available as a PDF download, so that even after your course session concludes, you can keep all the materials to refer to later.

10. You'll make research progress. Our classes incorporate exercises that allow you to practice techniques and apply what you've learned to your own family history work.

Be sure to watch our "crash course" video to see a demonstration of how our courses work.


Family Tree University | Research Tips | Videos
Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:30:10 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, June 23, 2010
French Canadian Roots? Search the Drouin Collection Free June 24-26
Posted by Diane

Got French Candian ancestors? You’ll be thrilled to know that subscription genealogy site Ancestry.ca (the Canadian sister to Ancestry.com) is making its Drouin Collection—best available French Canadian genealogy resource—free for three days from June 24-26.

See the full Ancestry.ca announcement on Dick Eastman’s Genealogy blog. The freebie celebrates Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, a national holiday of Quebec on June 24. You’ll need a free Ancestry.ca registration to access the records.

(Note that the Drouin collection also is on Ancestry.com, but isn’t being made free there.)

The Drouin Collection has millions of names from family books of the Drouin Genealogical Institute, founded in 1899. Information comes from Quebec vital and notarial records, Acadian Catholic church records, Ontario Catholic church records and early US French Catholic church records. The collection dates from the beginning of European settlement to the 1940s, documenting many Quebec families over three centuries.

Want more information on researching your French  Canadian ancestors? See the French Canadian research guide in the June 2006 Family Tree Magazine, available as a digital download from ShopFamilyTree.com. (Family Tree Magazine Plus members can access the guide on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.)


Ancestry.com | Free Databases | French Canadian roots
Wednesday, June 23, 2010 1:10:44 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
Tried the Free FamilySearch Record Databases Lately?
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch sent out an announcement that it’s added millions of names and digital images in 29 collections at the FamilySearch Record Search Pilot Site.

The same content is searchable at FamilySearch Beta, where a new interface and search options are being tested. Click Show Advanced to see all the search fields, which include birth and death year and place, as well as information about parents and spouse. You also can add year ranges designate search terms as exact.

I searched for the same ancestor on both sites, and the beta site seemed to do a better job of weeding out irrelevant results.

Many of the new records are international, comprising church, civil registration or census records from Costa Rica, France, Hungary, Mexico and Spain. In addition, the 1910 US census index grew by nine more states.

In all, the site has 428 record collections and counting. You can see them listed both on the Record Search Pilot and on FamilySearch Beta site.

You can get help using the genealogical resources of FamilySearch on FamilyTreeMagazine.com:


FamilySearch | Free Databases | Genealogy Web Sites
Wednesday, June 23, 2010 12:42:52 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Tuesday, June 22, 2010
Here's to the First Decade ... and Many More!
Posted by Diane

As Family Tree Magazine approached its 10th anniversary in 2010, podcast host Lisa Louise Cooke decided it was time to invite back frequent contributor David Fryxell for a behind-the-scenes look at the magazine’s first decade. Cooke wrote this post about their conversation:

As the founding editor, Fryxell couldn’t help but get a little nostalgic about Family Tree Magazine’s early years and vast amount of ground covered since.
 
In Family Tree Magazine Podcast Episode 20, Fryxell explained the difficulties staff faced in getting the magazine off the ground—starting with the lack of a good, compiled list of genealogists to mail to. But thankfully word spread and interest grew quickly.
 
Fryxell summed up his feelings about the expanding reach of the magazine this way: “It’s really been gratifying to see over the years how many people it has helped. People are still excited to discover the magazine!”

And that is so true. I experienced that just last week at the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree. My Genealogy Gems Podcast booth was set up next to the Family Tree Magazine booth, and there were plenty of newbies whose eyes lit up when they discovered free podcasts and a magazine passionately devoted to family history.
 
While articles, graphics and fonts change over the years, Fryxell is confident that some things never change. “The mission was and continues to be to provide you with the tools to make progress in your family history.”
 
But in this high-tech, online world, what does the future hold for a print magazine? Fryxell is confident that with its mission still firmly in place, Family Tree Magazine has much more to offer now and well into the future.
 
“The print medium serves as an entry point to all the stuff that’s online. Family Tree Magazine can show you how to find useful sites and useable search results!” Fryxell declares.
 
I couldn’t agree more. With thousands—if not hundreds of thousands—of genealogy websites, it’s more important than ever to have a trusted friend who can help you sift through all the noise and get to the information that will provide genealogical success.
 
And with the Family Tree Magazine Podcast, we like to think we're giving that trusted friend another voice.
 
Thanks for listening!
 
Lisa Louise Cooke is the voice of the Family Tree Magazine Podcast, as well as an instructor for Family Tree University, writer for the magazine, and publisher of the new DVD Google Earth for Genealogy, available at ShopFamilyTree.com.

Family Tree Magazine's Podcast

↑ Grab this Headline Animator


Family Tree Magazine articles | Podcasts
Tuesday, June 22, 2010 1:43:41 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, June 21, 2010
A Look at the New Land Ownership Maps on Ancestry.com
Posted by Diane

Subscription genealogy site Ancestry.com recently added a collection of US land ownership maps—about 1,200 county land ownership atlases digitized from microfilmed at the Library of Congress. The atlases come from 20 states and date between 1860 and 1918.

Maps show land parcels labeled with owners’ names. They vary in appearance depending on when and where they were published. This one shows Van Buren Township, Ind., in 1914.



You can search the collection by state, county, year or owner’s name. When you click to view an image, it may take awhile to hunt for the name you need (use the magnifying glass in Ancestry.com's record viewer to enlarge the image).

Once you find a relative's parcel, look at the other names. You may see names of people who’ve appeared as witnesses on family documents, or families who’ve married into yours. If you can determine when your ancestor purchased the land, you can contact the county (usually, the county clerk or the recorder's office) to request a deed of sale.

It helps to have a good idea of where an ancestor lived and when he owned land before you search this database. The maps offer no identifying information about the landowners, so if you just search on an ancestor to see if he shows up, you may have a hard time deciding if a match is the right person.

The M. Reuter who owns land at the top of the above map may be a relative of mine (I’m guessing my great-grandfather’s brother).


I found the family in the 1920 census ...



but then I realized I have other work I need to get done today. I’ll let you know what I find out about this.

In the mean time, you can learn more about how to find your ancestors' land records in these resources from Family Tree Magazine:

Ancestry.com | Land records
Monday, June 21, 2010 1:38:46 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, June 18, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: June 14-18
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch has added records from Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Guatemala, Mexico, Spain, and the United States to its Record Search Pilot site and Beta Search site. US additions include indexes to the 1910 census for several states, Massachusetts death records, Minnesota probate court wills.
  • Michigan residents can access state history-related documents (such as personal narratives, memoirs, pamphlets and political speeches) and historical essays through Gale’s collection Michigana, Sources in U.S. History Online, available as part of Michigan eLibrary. (Some eLibrary material is accessible to only those who log in with a Michigan library card, driver’s license or state ID.)


FamilySearch | Genealogy Web Sites | UK and Irish roots
Friday, June 18, 2010 2:55:30 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
Make a Family History Book
Posted by Grace

Have you thought about creating a book about your family but didn't know where to start? One of our new Family Tree University classes, Creating a Family History Book, takes you step-by-step through the process!

Instructor Nancy Hendrickson gives you advice for determining a theme, collecting the information you need for the book and putting the whole thing together. She's also got tips for great family interviews:
Anecdotes are the heart and soul of interviews—they are those wonderful little stories we all love reading. But how do you get those anecdotes? Author John Brady writes, "If he says, 'I owe my 40 years of marriage to absolute understanding and compatibility,' ask him, 'What do you mean by understanding and compatibility? Can you give me some examples?'"
 
Asking follow-up questions is important because it lets the subject know you're genuinely curious and interested in what they’re saying. Although you have a prepared list of questions, don't be afraid to follow one of your subject's comments off into unexpected territory. 
 
If this is your first interview, you may feel nervous and awkward. Take heart. You'll improve with practice. When you think the interview is over, ask one last question: "Is there anything else I should have asked you?" You'll be surprised at the great information this question elicits.
This class starts Monday, June 21 and lasts for four weeks. It's self-paced, so you can work on the exercises and your book project whenever it's convenient for you, and Nancy will give you personalized feedback on your work! You can download a copy of the syllabus here and sign up for the class here.


Celebrating your heritage | Family Tree University
Friday, June 18, 2010 10:07:17 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]