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# Wednesday, December 10, 2008
New Site Details Slave Ships' Voyages
Posted by Diane

A new site just launched to preserve the story of the slave trade and the Africans who became part of the largest forced migration in modern history.



Voyages has an African Names database with details on more than 67,000 slaves who were captive on slave vessels during the 19th century.

None of those Africans made it to the Americas, though—the ships were captured by naval cruisers after Britain and the US outlawed the slave trade in 1807. (Britain abolished slavery altogether in the British West Indies in 1838; the United States prohibited it in 1865.)

For that reason, and because Africans were identified by given names only, it's unlikely you'll find an ancestor here.

A Voyages database details nearly 35,000 journeys of ships (but not the passengers) that did deliver slaves to the New World—you'll see the name of the ship, captain's name, year, and where slaves were purchased and sold.

Through its essays, maps and charts, the site sheds a fascinating light on the slave trade from 1514 until the last recorded slave voyage to the Americas in 1866. Estimates show 12.5 million African slaves were transported across the Atlantic between 1525 and 1866. As late as 1820, nearly four Africans had crossed the Atlantic for every European.

The databases were compiled from data scholars have collected over decades, and published online thanks to several grants. See Voyages' Understanding the Database section for in-depth guidance on using the site.

African-American roots
Wednesday, December 10, 2008 2:56:00 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
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