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# Wednesday, February 26, 2014
How to Connect With Genealogists on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube
Posted by Diane

I'm old enough to remember Web 1.0, when you could view online content, and that was about it.

Wow, have things changed.

Now, we learn about genealogy not only from those with the wherewithal to create and maintain a website, but also from each other, through social media. Friending and following your fellow genealogists can lead you to new genealogy resources, strategies, stories and inspiration.

Plus, it feels good to participate in a community of people as passionate about something as you are.

Yesterday we announced our roundup of 40 genealogy Social Media Mavericks to follow on blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube. You can see the roundup in the March/April 2014 Family Tree Magazine article by Lisa Louise Cooke of Genealogy Gems, and on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.



These mavericks are great "curators" of online genealogy information. They share news and research advice, provide inspiration, ask thought-provoking questions, and offer insight into historical records and photos. I'm glad they're around to help us manage the intimidating amount of online family history information!

Of course, there are a lot of other influential social media channels. If you're new to social media, or you're just beginning to add it to your genealogy bag of tricks, Lisa suggests using these Social Media Mavericks as a starting point. Then branch out to individuals and groups that meet your research needs.

For example, on Facebook, I've joined groups and liked pages related to places my ancestors lived and the orphanage where my grandfather grew up.

Here are ways to connect with researchers on Facebook, Pinterest, blogs, YouTube and Twitter:
  • Once you sign up for Facebook,  in the "Search for people, places and things" box at the top, type a term such as German genealogy. Don't hit Enter. You can choose from the options that automatically appear, or click See more results at the bottom of the list to see more groups (open or closed, meaning you must request to join), pages, people, events and apps related to your search terms.
  • On Pinterest, try entering genealogy into the search box at the top left. You'll see pins related to your search. Click the Boards tab to see other Pinners' boards with genealogy in the title, or click Pinners to see pinners with genealogy in their name. If you've registered for Pinterest, you can repin a pin or follow a board or pinner. Otherwise, click on a pin to link to the source blog or website (although not all pins link to more information). (Here's our guide to using Pinterest for genealogy.)
  • To find blogs about ethnicities or places of interest to you, use the GeneaBloggers search or blogroll, or run a web search on a topic and genealogy blog.
  • YouTube lets you search for videos using the search box at the top of the page. Once you find a video you like, you can click the red Subscribe button (if you're a YouTube member) to make it easy to find that channel again.
  • On Twitter, you can use the search box at the top to find Twitterers to follow (similar to Facebook). Use a hashtag (#) to search for posts tagged with a particular topic. For example, search for #rootstech to find posts about the RootsTech genealogy conference.  

  • Finally, ask your genealogy friends (on Facebook and in real life) who they follow and friend. If your friends find it helpful, there's a good chance you will, too.



Family Tree Magazine articles | Genealogy Web Sites | Research Tips | Social Networking
Wednesday, February 26, 2014 3:24:13 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
Thursday, February 27, 2014 9:13:05 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)
Diane,

You must have missed a step in your validation process of your own work.

..... Random Acts of Genealogy Kindness has CLOSED

see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Random_Acts_of_Genealogical_Kindness
Friday, February 28, 2014 2:43:34 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)
Hi, Jay,
As noted in the Social Media Mavericks article linked in the post, the RAOGK Facebook group is different from the website that is now closed. The wikipedia link you provide refers to the closed website.

The Facebook Group was founded upon the same ideals, and attempts to pick up where the now-defunct site left off. The Facebook group is alive and well—at least it was when I messaged the coordinator Wednesday about the inclusion in our article.
Diane
Diane
Comments are closed.