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# Monday, December 23, 2013
6 Simple Ways (3 Are Free) to Use Ancestry.com
Posted by Diane

Genealogy website Ancestry.com encompasses some 31,000 databases with more than 9 billion historical records. Where’s an overwhelmed genealogist to start? Here are six suggestions (half of them free) for family tree tasks you can do on the site.

For Ancestry.com search demos and tips that'll help you get the most out of your subscription (or figure out whether to subscribe), consider our Jan. 23 webinar 10 Simple Strategies for Using Ancestry.com.

1. Explore what’s available for free. The site also offers a surprising number of free data collections. To find them, go to the Card Catalog, type free in the keyword blank and click Search. And remember that many libraries and FamilySearch Centers offer free access to almost all the site's databases through Ancestry Library Edition.

2. Create or upload your family tree. It's free to put your own family tree files on Ancestry.com, a way to share information and organize your research. A subscription will allow you to view the site's suggested matches in records, as well as see other members’ trees that overlap with yours.

3. Follow hints. Once you’ve created a tree, the site will automatically search for record matches. A leaf icon in the corner of an ancestor’s box indicates there's a “hint” for that person. Click the leaf to see the hint (you'll need a subscription to see most hints). If you determine the suggested match really is your relative, you can attach the record to your tree.

4. Scour message boards. The site's vast array of message boards (identical to those on RootsWeb) is free to access. Check boards for all the surnames you’re researching, as well as places where your family has lived.

5. Search. You’ll get the best results by clicking Show Advanced in the upper right portion of the home page and using the advanced search options. Sometimes you get better results by searching a category of records (such as immigration or census records) or a single database. To search a category, select it from the drop-down list under Search. Use the card catalog to find individual databases.

6. Search other trees. See who else is researching your ancestors (and what they're saying about them) by searching the site's Member Trees. As with any online tree site, remember that the information isn't independently verified and may contain errors. Examine any attached records and sources cited, contact the submitter for more details, and do your own research to verify the names, dates and relationships.

The 10 Simple Strategoes for Using Ancestry.com webinar takes place Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 7 p.m. ET (6 p.m. CT, 5 p.m. MT and 4 p.m. PT). It includes a handout of the presentation slides, plus access to view the webinar again as often as you want!

Register now for the early bird discount at ShopFamilyTree.com.


Ancestry.com | Webinars
Monday, December 23, 2013 8:48:43 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
Friday, December 27, 2013 8:34:03 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)
It is probably just me (usually is)
Your card catalog link didn't work for me.
And money makes the world go round, the Public Trees, really should be called "Public but not free" Trees, you will see your ancestor's name 137 times but that is all, poor folks need not apply after spending a small fortune just getting on the internet. Bad attitude, I guess so!!
Henry
Friday, December 27, 2013 1:04:52 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)
Henry,

Here is the address to Ancestry's card catalog: http://search.ancestry.com/search/cardcatalog.aspx

Also, if you are interested in viewing public member trees without a subscription, you can login to mundia.com (Ancestry's free sister site) with your Ancestry credentials and view public trees that way.

Hope this helps,
Rachel
Rachel
Comments are closed.