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# Saturday, May 12, 2012
"Who Do You Think You Are?": Not All Family Legacies Are Happy
Posted by Diane

The young woman I bought coffee from this morning (before heading to our booth at the National Genealogical Society conference in Cincinnati) was talking about last night's "Who Do You Think You Are?" and how she wants to check out the exhibit hall today. Which is what we hope the show will do--be the spark that takes someone's interest in family history and turns it into action.

So, the show: Actor and comedian Jason Sudeikis researched his dad's paternal line, discovering a legacy of sons who grew up without their dads.

A death record told Sudeikis his dad's dad, Stanley, died young, at age 32, from a fall, and shared a residence in Chicago with an unknown woman who was the informant on the record. A coroner's investigation shed more light on the situation: The woman was a cousin who testified that Stanley abused alcohol and slept in the park.

Court records showed Sudeikis his grandmother had filed for a legal separation from her husband because he'd abandoned the family. He'd never met Sudeikis dad.

It turned out he was living what he knew. In census and marriage records, Sudeikis found that Stanley's father, Stanley Sr., had abandoned his first wife (Sudeikis' great-grandmother) and married another woman in Connecticut. There was no record of a divorce from the earlier marriage.

Stanley Sr.'s father died in Pennsylvania in a mining accident when his son was a boy.

Not all family legacies are positive, but I like how this episode shows family history can be rewarding even when you're learning some sad truths. At the end of the episode, Sudeikis honors his dad for breaking a cycle, and being a great father even though he didn't have a model to follow.

You can watch this show online at the "Who Do You Think You Are?" website.


"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Celebrity Roots

Saturday, May 12, 2012 11:52:20 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
Sunday, May 13, 2012 11:31:28 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
Except there appears to be a little problem with this narrative. In the 1930 census, Stanley is living with Emma and Stanley Jr. in Chicago. Additionally, the Census records Stanley Sr. to have entered the US in 1913, which would be 12 years after the mining disaster. Given that Stanley Sr. was born somewhere in the 1890's and Joseph in the 1900 Census immigrated to the United States in 1884, I think someone made a mistake somewhere.
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