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# Monday, April 09, 2012
Ancestry.com to Release AncestryDNA Autosomal DNA Test
Posted by Diane

Before the 1940 census came out, genealogists on Facebook were buzzing about a new DNA test Ancestry.com has been teasing but hasn't yet released.

Blaine Bettinger, who shares his expertise on on using genetic genealogy for family history research on his The Genetic Genealogist blog, tried out the new test for Family Tree Magazine. In this guest post, he explains what it can do for your family tree:

With each year, it seems, genealogists get new tools for examining their family trees. 2012 has already given us the 1940 census to spend countless hours with, and now Ancestry.com plans to launch a new autosomal DNA test, AncestryDNA, later this year.

Autosomal DNA tests examine thousands of locations throughout your genome, and that information is used to estimate the percentage of the genome that's derived from regions around the world (called "admixture"). Test results also can help you identify genetic cousins by comparing your DNA to all other DNA in the company’s database.

AncestryDNA offers both admixture and matching, which they call “Genetic Ethnicity” and “Member DNA Matches:”

  • Genetic Ethnicity: This calculation is based on roughly 22 populations around the world from proprietary and public databases, with more likely to be added.

  • Member DNA Matches: This tool shows the individuals with whom you share DNA through a common ancestor. You also receive an estimate of the predicted relationship range (such as third cousin, fourth cousin). This tool also offers what I believe is the most interesting aspect of the AncestryDNA test: the automatic comparison of matches’ family trees.

    In other words, if John Doe and I share DNA, AncestryDNA will compare my family tree to his (if he has a public tree on Ancestry.com) to determine whether any surnames or even individuals overlap. If there are overlaps, both users will be notified.

    As someone who's spent many hours comparing family trees looking for common ancestors with genetic cousins, I believe this tool will prove to be very useful.

AncestryDNA is currently in beta and isn't yet available for purchase. No pricing information is available yet.

Disclaimer: This information is based on the beta version of the AncestryDNA test. Accordingly, results and features are subject to change before the full launch of the test. Further, I received a complimentary test from Ancestry.com in order to evaluate the product.


Ancestry.com | Genetic Genealogy
Monday, April 09, 2012 9:59:16 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [7]
Monday, April 09, 2012 3:23:40 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
My beta version of the AncestryDNA test was not complimentary, but it's cost was very nominal (about $10). Although I have not had a chance to thoroughly review my recent results, initially I am pleased. I was given information about 4 other ancestry.com members with a 95% or greater confidence that they match in my family tree. I did not have any new or shocking results with my genetic ethnicity summary, but all in all my results were very interesting. As with every "Aha!" moment in genealogy, there is always more to discover, and I am excited about doing just that!
Penny Maynard
Tuesday, April 10, 2012 8:33:32 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
Thank you for sharing this information, Penny!
Diane
Tuesday, April 10, 2012 2:18:47 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
I also did the test in November 2011, but have not yet received any results from Ancestry. My cost was also about $10.00 for the Beta testing. Hopefully I will receive some news in the near furture.
Lisa
Lisa
Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:22:29 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
I had Autosomal DNA done at FamilyTree. Can I share those results with Ancestry to increase the pool of potential cousins? Have found several already :-)
Judith Heald
Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:38:05 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
I bought the beta test kit also with no news up to first of April so I emailed Ancestry. They checked, found my sample was "insufficient" so they sent me a more comprehensive kit at no charge. Just sent if back so no results yet, but so far with a little prompting they have been compliant. Can't wait to get the results; am especially interested in the ethnicity profile. --Ellen
Ellen
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 12:43:44 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
How is this test different or similar to the standard X and Y testing offered by Ancestry.com? I am a male and have had a 46 marker test performed by ancestry.com. Do you know if I need to submit a new sample or is this information extracted from my existing results?

Also wondering how you (author and readers) became aware of the beta test? Were you randomly selected? Is there a way I can volunteer?
M.F.
Friday, May 04, 2012 5:05:42 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
@Judith - right now there is no option available to transfer autosomal DNA into AncestryDNA's database.
@M.F. - Beta testers were sent invites by Ancestry.com many months ago. They chose 12,000 participants from previous DNA testers and subscribers. The selection seemed random, but probably wasn't. Blaine and I and a handful of others also received kits as bloggers. As of yesterday, they are going to begin offering the test for $99 to all Ancestry.com subscribers.
They did try to use some of the biobanked DNA, but ended up having to send a new kit in many cases. Autosomal DNA tests take quite a lot of DNA.
Y-DNA testing only informs us about our direct paternal ancestors (father's father's father, etc...) and mtDNA only informs us about our direct maternal ancestors (mother's mother's mother, etc...). Both of those tests give us a glimpse into our deep ancestry on those lines (only) based on our haplogroups. Autosomal DNA is inherited from all of our great grandparents and therefore potentially informs us about all of our relatively recent ancestors. Anyone can take this test because everyone has autosomal DNA.
CeCe
Comments are closed.