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# Wednesday, January 09, 2008
Blog Readers Await WWI Soldier's Letters
Posted by Diane

A British war blog is getting a lot of attention lately. What’s unusual is that it’s from World War I—in a way.

On WWI: Experiences of an English Soldier, blogger Bill Lamin is posting letters his grandfather William Henry "Harry" Bonser Lamin wrote from the trenches in France, Italy and elsewhere in Europe during World War I. Each letter appears 90 years to the day after it's dated.

Readers don’t know whether a letter is Harry’s last, just as Harry’s family—sisters Kate and Annie; brother, Jack; wife, Ethel; son Willie; and niece, Connie (whom Harry and Ethel cared for)—didn’t know.

The letters, which Lamin found in his parents’ home, are filled with battle descriptions, complaints about tight quarters and spare rations, thanks for parcels from home, and requests for more missives from family. Harry dated this letter July 14, 1917:
I’m in good health but we have had a rough time this last week or two going on working parties at night digging trenches and one thing and another. One night we were between our lines and the Germans but we all came out alright. It’s a bit rough but it might be worse.
Lamin supplements the letters with photos, updates from genealogical research on the family, and details from the battalion’s official war diary, which you also can read in a separate blog. (Learn more about British battalion and unit war diaries here.)

If you want to find out more about an American WWI soldier, see the WWI research guide in the November 2007 Family Tree Magazine and use the WWI resource toolkit on FamilyTreeMagazine.com.


Genealogy Web Sites | Military records | Social History
Wednesday, January 09, 2008 8:35:44 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
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