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# Monday, September 16, 2013
Can Your DNA Reveal Where Your Ancestors Came From?
Posted by Diane

One of the caveats of genetic genealogy testing has been that you get only a general idea of where in the world your roots are, such as "British Isles," "Scandinavian" or "West African." (Labels and specificity vary with the testing company and the test you choose.) And the ethnicity estimates you do get can have a significant margin of error.

That could be changing. "The AncestryDNA science team is looking toward a future where we could reveal, in the absence of a family tree, the most probable locations where one’s ancestors lived," writes population geneticist Julie Granka on AncestryDNA's Tech Roots blog.

About 6,000 AncestryDNA customers received a preview last week of a new ethnicity estimate that more-accurately calculates the person's ethnicity based on 26 reference populations around the world.  (The new, finer-resolution estimate works with a customer's existing results, so no new testing is needed.)

Granka's post reveals one example of the more-specific analysis: Her team has been able to separate ancestry from West Africa into six population groups based on genetic data. 

Previously, someone with African-American ancestry might learn they have genetic origins somewhere within the green bubble on the left (this image is from the Tech Roots blog, and used with permission). The new analysis can narrow those roots to one of the six colored bubbles on the right.



Those new ethnicity regions of West Africa are Senegal, Mali, Ivory Coast/Ghana, Benin/Togo, Nigeria, and Cameroon/Congo, each of which has a distinct set of tribal affiliations.

West Africa was the main source of the slave trade to America. This finding provides a new genealogy research path for African-Americans who've been unable to find records of enslaved ancestors.

Here's another example of the ethnicity estimate update:On the Genetic Genealogist blog, Blaine Bettinger shows you a comparison of his old and new AncestryDNA estimates.

You'll know you're one of the lucky 6,000 AncestryDNA customers if you see an orange button that says "New! Ethnicity estimate preview" on your DNA results page. AncestryDNA will roll out the new ethnicity estimate to remaining customers over the next few months.

Bettinger recently presented our Intro to DNA Crash Course webinar to help you figure out how to use genetic genealogy to uncover your family history and get over research brick walls. Check out the webinar in ShopFamilyTree.com.



Ancestry.com | Genetic Genealogy | Webinars
Monday, September 16, 2013 10:42:34 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
Tuesday, September 17, 2013 2:57:04 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
Disappointed with ancestry's DNA because mine came out 76% Scandinavian little Slavic and little Trukish, whereas all my people came from Germany and took the test because thought my people came to Germany after the 30 year war from France. No German or French and should have been some showing.
Richard Piepho
Comments are closed.