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# Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Project to Bring SC Slave Lineages Online
Posted by Diane

For African-American genealogists, breaking through the brick wall of slavery can require thorough, painstaking research into the records of the slaveowning families—with no guarantee of success. You can’t simply log on to a Web site and expect to find meticulously researched and reconstructed lineages of slave families that connect all the dots for you.

But that’s exactly what three organizations plan to create for descendants of the slaves of Charleston, SC’s Magnolia Plantation and others operated by the Drayton family. In a project funded by the plantation’s foundation, the University of South Florida’s all-volunteer Africana Heritage Project will pore over the Draytons' plantation journals to re-create the family trees of its slaves. Those family files will be posted on genealogy wiki WeRelate, where family history researchers will be able to access them for free. Africana Heritage Project founding director Toni Carrier says the files—in GEDCOM format—will appear gradually as the research progresses. "We aim to have the first batch up by mid-July," she says.

Magnolia Plantation is also collaborating with the Africana Heritage Project on a new Web site to be launched in March 2008: Lowcountry Africana will document African-American heritage in South Carolina, Georgia and northeastern Florida’s historic rice-growing region—in particular, its unique Gullah/Geechee culture. The site will feature slaveholding families’ plantation records, a searchable database of primary historical documents, name indexes to Lowcountry history and genealogy books, historical photographs and more.

Carrier encourages genealogists and families with ties (or suspected ties) to Drayton family plantations to contact her organization. "We would love to invite them to join this exciting journey of discovery," she says.


African-American roots
Tuesday, June 26, 2007 1:28:31 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
Wednesday, June 27, 2007 2:34:29 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
good morning,on the 1870 census of polk county,texas is my great great great grandfather and his wife andrew and becky campbell.in their household is becky's mother betsy and both becky and betsy are listed as being from south carolina however i do not know the county? betsy is listed as being 80 in 1870.thank you-p.o.box 338-compton,ca.90223
muhammad abdullah
Wednesday, June 27, 2007 5:51:50 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
Muhammad,

That's a good lead--now you'll have to do some additional research to try to find out where in South Carolina Becky and Betsy came from. First, the census record you referenced says Andrew and his and Becky's children were born in Alabama. That suggests the family might have lived together in Alabama before moving to Texas. I'd recommend focusing your research there first--records from Alabama may point to Becky's South Carolina origins.

You may want to check out an article coming in our November issue on tracing African-American roots. It includes tips for working backward from the 1870 census. Another excellent resource is the book A Genealogist's Guide to Tracing Your African-American Ancestors (look for it in the Family Tree Magazine online bookstore or at your library). It talks about various records and how to use them, as well as provides case studies showing how the authors traced various slave families.
Allison
Monday, July 23, 2007 7:48:05 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)
Dear All,

I'm looking forward to getting involved in the project, since I am descended from the younger brother of Rev.John Grimke-Drayton of Magnolia Gardens. Please take a look at my website. A great deal has taken place since my last visit to Charleston in September last year. I shall be coming over from the UK again this September to continue my research and meet up with friends and colleagues. This project is extremely important for all of us.
Friday, December 21, 2007 12:28:13 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)
I am trying to find Adoption genealogy researcher and I am african-american. I am from Brooklyn, NY. I can't find Adoption Genealogy researcher in NYC. Sighs. I wonder, if someone works at Adoption genealogy researcher like African-American male or woman?

If so, please feel free to contact me. Hope to hear from you soon. Thank you for your time and cooperation.

Capricia Avery
Comments are closed.