Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
October, 2014 (13)
September, 2014 (17)
August, 2014 (18)
July, 2014 (16)
June, 2014 (18)
May, 2014 (17)
April, 2014 (17)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<October 2014>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2829301234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930311
2345678

More Links








# Friday, September 12, 2014
Genealogy News Corral: Sept. 8-12
Posted by Diane

  • Subscription site Findmypast.com  has added more than 240,000 parish records to its marriage and burial records for Surrey, Middlesex and Eastebourne parishes in Britain. (And I didn't know that genealogical socities that transcribe these records for Findmypast get a royalty each time the records are viewed.) The site also has added an "Attach a Tree" button to its images and transcriptions, so you can attach records to your ancestors' profiles in your Findmypast family tree.
  • Here's an alarming heads up from genealogy author Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak: Someone is selling a fake Kindle book with her name on it on Amazon.com. Add it to the list of scams that writers and genealogy consumers have to watch out for. Visit Megan's Roots World blog to see the warning and make sure you don't fall for this one.


Ancestry.com | Celebrity Roots | findmypast | Genealogy books | Genealogy TV | Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, September 12, 2014 10:01:57 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, May 30, 2014
Genealogy News Corral: May 26-30
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch's recently updated collections come from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, New Zealand, Peru, Spain, and the United States. They include Quebec notarial records, Freedmen's Bureau records, and New York passenger arrival records from 1909 and 1925 to 1957 (that's after the time period you can search at EllisIsland.org, and it includes air passengers). Go here to read more about the updates and click through to search or browse each one.

  • Record additions at subscription website findmypast.com include Irish marriage and death notices from American newspapers, 4 million British army service records dating from 1914 to 1920, 19th-century marriage and death notices from New York City newspapers, and more. It's part of the site's 100 in 100 campaign to release 100 new record sets in 100 days.
  • The ScotlandsPeople website has added the wills of 31,000 soldiers from 1857 to 1964. They include records of 26,000 soldiers who died in World War I and 5,000 who died in World War II. A few hundred come from earlier wars. You can read more about this digitization project and sample records here (click Image Gallery). Register for free with the site to search the wills and view basic information; it costs 10 credits (about $2.90) to view a document.



FamilySearch | findmypast | Genealogy books | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Friday, May 30, 2014 12:00:27 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, October 09, 2013
Free eBook: Finding Ancestors With GenealogyBank
Posted by Diane

I've blogged before about my family history finds in newspapers, including my first "big" one, on GenealogyBank—a 1924 Dallas Morning News article about my grandfather, then a boy in a Texas orphanage. It even had a photo of him.

GenealogyBank is letting us offer a free ebook you can download about how to find your ancestors in records on the site (which is known for its huge newspaper collection, although it also has historical documents and books).

Click here to get your free How to Search GenealogyBank.com ebook.





Genealogy books | Newspapers
Wednesday, October 09, 2013 1:53:57 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, October 02, 2013
The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Genealogy How-to for 13 Countries and Regions
Posted by Diane

As you might guess, I enjoy asking people I've just met where their ancestors are from. Here in Cincinnati, the answer often involves Germany, so then I ask about their surnames to see if we have anyone in common. (Then I wrap it up before people start thinking I'm weird.)

Every once in awhile, someone will answer my ancestor inquiry with, "Oh, I'm a mutt" and rattle off a bunch of ancestral homelands.

Well, this is for all you genealogy mutts: The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe.



It collects genealogy research guides to 13 countries or regions of Europe, plus European Jewish ancestors. You'll learn
  • what records are available and where they're kept
  • which records you can get from here in the US using the web, microfilm, books and other sources
  • how to get records from overseas
  • how to deal with language barriers and boundary changes
  • what websites, books, organizations and archives can help in your research
It's a good way to get expert instructions for researching ancestors across Europe in one economical package. The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe is available now in ShopFamilyTree.com (where you'll see the list of countries covered).

You also can get The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe as an ebook.


Genealogy books | German roots | International Genealogy | Italian roots | Jewish roots | UK and Irish roots
Wednesday, October 02, 2013 2:43:52 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, April 26, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, April 22-26
Posted by Diane

  • The Online Historical Directories website, which lists links to old city and other directories, has been updated with links for Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Check out the updates here.
  • Michael Savoca, a college junior from Toms River, NJ, has won a $500 grant for genealogy research and education from the Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Grant program, as well as registration for the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree. Michael has assisted with records for the Gente di Mare Italian website, been an active member of several online genealogy forums, and volunteered at his local FamilySearch Center. He also has researched his Croatian family history on site in the village of Zablaće.

    The grant, awarded annually since 2010 to a genealogist aged 18 to 25, is named for the mother of The Family Curator blogger Denise Levenick.


Genealogy books | Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, April 26, 2013 4:38:01 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, March 28, 2013
History at Your Fingertips
Posted by Diane

Did you know that your California Gold Rush ancestors from the East Coast traveled around six months and spent about $200 to make the trip?

That the city of Vicksburg, Miss., didn't celebrate Independence Day from 1863, when residents surrendered on July 4 after a 47-day Union siege, until 1945?

That during the Oklahoma Land Rush of April 22, 1889, two cities of 10,000 residents each (Oklahoma City and Guthrie) sprang up in less than a day?

The Genealogist's U.S. History Pocket Reference by Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Nancy Hendrickson delivers fascinating facts such as these, plus timelines, charts (one, for example, summarizes the dates, causes and outcomes of the major Indian wars), maps, important dates (including censuses), and lists of popular foods, books, music and trends. It encapsulates historical phenomena you might need a refresher on, such as the Triangle Trade and Bleeding Kansas. 

An awareness of the events your ancestors witnessed can unlock records in your family history research and provide context for the records you've already discovered.

This conveniently sized book is chronologically organized into historical eras for easy browsing of the time periods important to your genealogy research—and to your understanding of your ancestors' lives.

Learn more about The Genealogist's U.S. History Pocket Reference in ShopFamilyTree.com.


Genealogy books | Research Tips | Social History
Thursday, March 28, 2013 8:26:00 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, March 18, 2013
Family Tree eBooks Giveaway Winner!
Posted by Diane

Congratulations to Joyce Shepard of Bedford, Ind., who won our Family Tree eBooks subscription giveaway! She'll enjoy a year of access to our digital library of genealogy how-to books and Family Tree Magazine issues.

Looking for more opportunities to win? Check out our Irish Ancestry Photo Contest—share a picture of your Irish ancestors, and you could win a download of our video class Finding Ancestral Clues in Irish Census Records.

Click here to submit your photo—the deadline is March 26, 2013.


Genealogy books | UK and Irish roots
Monday, March 18, 2013 8:21:29 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Win a Genealogy Library at Your Fingertips
Posted by Diane

Here's a chance to win a genealogy reference library at your fingertips: We're giving away a full year's subscription to our Family Tree eBooks site, which lets you access our digital collection of how-to books on genealogy, history, heirloom identification, sharing and preserving your family history, and more, plus dozens of information-packed issues of Family Tree Magazine. See the contents listing here.



This demo video shows you how easy it is to use the Family Tree eBooks site (there's even a mobile app).

To enter our Family Tree eBooks sweepstakes, fill out this form by 11:59 p.m. ET March 14, 2013. The winner will be chosen at random from all entries received and notified by email. Good luck!

Genealogy books | Genealogy fun
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 3:00:32 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, March 04, 2013
Family Photo Detective Book Winner!
Posted by Diane

Congratulations to the lucky winner of our Family Photo Detective book sweepstakes: Patti Wier of Artesia, NM!

She'll receive a copy of the hot-off-the-presses Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries by Maureen A. Taylor.



Patti will be able to take advantage of Maureen's advice for using clothing, backgrounds, props and photographer imprints to learn more about who's in her old family photographs. Blending this type of photo research with research in genealogy records is a great strategy for discovering details about your ancestors.

Family Photo Detective is available at booksellers including ShopFamilyTree.com.

Genealogy books | Genealogy fun | Photos
Monday, March 04, 2013 9:24:38 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 28, 2013
Researchers' Favorite Genealogy Books and History-Related Reads
Posted by Diane

Last weekend's Family Tree University Virtual Genealogy Conference was informative, inspirational and just plain fun. Over the next few weeks, I'll share some tips I picked up from the live chats. (And I'll keep you posted on the next Virtual Genealogy Conference, scheduled for September.)

The genealogy books chat made me plan a trip to the library and start surfing Amazon.com: A bunch of conference attendees got together and talked about their go-to genealogy reference books and favorite history-related reads, including those below (for books we carry in ShopFamilyTree.com, I've linked to the listing):
  • Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills

  • The Family Tree Sourcebook by the editors of Family Tree Magazine

  • The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy edited by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking

  • How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick

  • A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Female Ancestors by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack

  • Women and the Law of Property in Early America by Marylynn Salmon ("helps when looking at court records and understanding how women were treating in regards to their rights to own property," said the chatter, and it covers "1750 to 1830ish")

  • Finding Your Father's War by Jonathan Gawne ("for researching WWII soldiers")

  • Everyday Life in the 1800s by Marc McCutcheon

  • The Family Tree Problem Solver by Marsha Hoffman Rising ("the perfect book for when you're stuck on a line and need inspiration"), which also comes in a digital version

  • Reading Early American Handwriting by Kip Sperry ("the first part explains about the differences in writing styles, while the last three-quarters of the book has examples of documents with the transcriptions")

  • Genealogists Handbook for New England Research edited by Michael J. LeClerc

  • The Genealogist's Companion and Sourcebook and The Sleuthbook for Genealogists by Emily Anne Croom

  • Finding Indiana Ancestors by M. Teresa Baer and Geneil Breeze

  • Bringing Your Family History to Life Through Social History by Katherine Scott Sturdevant

  • Black's Law Dictionary, 4th edition ("the 4th edition is the most recent one that still has the old terms, as I understand")

  • No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting by Anne MacDonald, recommended by a chatter who is into knitting

  • Your Digital Afterlife....When Facebook, Flickr, and Twitter Are Your Estate, What's Your Legacy? by Evan Carroll and John Romano

  • Norwegians on the Prairie by Odd Lovoll

  • Italian Genealogical Records: How to use Italian Civil, Ecclesiastical and Other Records in Family History Research by Trafford Cole

  • Only a Few Bones by John Philip Colletta

  • Finding Italian Roots by John Philip Colletta

  • The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England ("written like a travel guide for people traveling from today back in time to the 14th century")

  • Annie's Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret by Steve Luxenberg

  • The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy by Val D. Greenwood
Would you add any books to this list? Click Comments below and let us know!


Family Tree University | Genealogy books | Genealogy Events
Thursday, February 28, 2013 9:29:32 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [5]
# Friday, February 15, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, Feb. 11-15
Posted by Diane

  • At the new, free website from Herthstone Legacy Publications called My Genealogy Hound, you can access thousands of biographies extracted from pre-1900 county history books. Biographies from Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Tennessee are available now, with more states to come. Search the site or browse biographies by surname or state and county. The site also has a selection of free, old county maps from Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kanasas, Missouri, Oklahoma (including Indian nations) and Tennessee, with more to be added.
  • The National Genealogical Society (NGS) has implemented student discounts for registration to its 2013 Family History Conference, May 8-11 in Las Vegas. Students can register for the full conference for $50 (NGS members) or $60 (nonmembers), nearly 75 percent off regular rates. To qualify, students must submit a letter on college or university letterhead from the dean or department chair. See the NGS blog for additional details and qualifications.


FamilySearch | Genealogy books | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | MyHeritage
Friday, February 15, 2013 2:49:45 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Monday, February 11, 2013
We're Giving Away a Copy of Family Photo Detective
Posted by Diane

Here's our Photo Detective Maureen A. Taylor's new book about researching your family photos (and those mystery photos that might or might not be your family):



... and you could win a copy by entering your name in our Family Photo Detective giveaway.

What's inside Family Photo Detective? You'll learn how to:
  • Determine whether you have a daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, cabinet card or other type of image
  • Use clothing, accessories and hairstyles to help date the image
  • Research photographer imprints
  • Compare facial features in multiple photos to help identify individuals 
  • Interview family members for information
  • Use photo props and background to add context
The Family Photo Detective giveaway ends Feb. 28 at 11:59 p.m. ET. And if you refer a friend who enters (by sending the link in your entry confirmation), you'll get two extra chances to win. Good luck!


Genealogy books | Genealogy fun | Photos
Monday, February 11, 2013 10:53:51 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, December 18, 2012
The End Is Near?
Posted by Beth

Friday, Dec. 21 is the winter solstice—the shortest day of the year and the date that marks the onset of winter. And, as you've no doubt heard by now, it's also the day the Mayan calendar ends, which many people believe translates to the end of the world. Happy holidays, eh?

This isn't the first time people have predicted the end of days and braced for the apocalypse. Here are three instances featured in Good Old Days, My Ass: 665 Funny History Facts and Terrifying Truths About Yesterday by David A. Fryxell:

  • Way back in 448, Moses of Crete, a rabbi, claimed to be the Messiah as predicted by Talmudic calculations and led his followers to the sea, which was supposed to part so they could reach Palestine. Having given away all their possessions, the rabbi's followers cast themselves into the Mediterranean. Seeing them crash on the rocks or drown, the rabbi declined to follow and "suddenly disappeared," leading some to conclude he had actually been "some malignant fiend" in human form.

  • Then there were the astrological predictions that a 1524 planetary alignment in Pisces would produce an apocalypse. Germans built boats, including a three-story ark constructed by Count von Igleheim, and residents of port cities took refuge afloat. When doomsday arrived with only a light drizzle, angry crowds outside the ark stampeded, trampling hundreds, and stoned the count to death.

  • In America, forerunners of today's Seventh-Day Adventists, the Millerites, followed Baptist preacher William Miller, who concluded Christ would return in 1844. Another Millerite pegged it more precisely on Oct. 22, 1844, a day that came to be known as "the Great Disappointment." Thousands of followers gave  away their possessions and awaited the end. When Jesus didn't appear, one wrote, "I lay prostrate for two days without any pain—sick with disappointment." Even children in the streets would taunt the disappointed Millerites, saying, "Have you not gone up [to heaven]?"

For a look at more interesting and often funny history facts—and terrifying truths—from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries, check out David's book.

And if, by chance, the world is ending on Friday, what's to stop you from indulging in another piece of homemade fudge washed down by a cup of eggnog? After all, it is the holiday season …  


Genealogy books | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Tuesday, December 18, 2012 3:04:26 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, December 05, 2012
Win Your Wish List!
Posted by Beth



What genealogy goodies would you like to find under your tree this holiday season? Enter ShopFamilyTree.com's Win Your Wish List Sweepstakes for a chance to receive them!

To enter: Visit the Win Your Wish List sweepstakes page to find instructions on how to select the five books, CDs, videos or other products you'd most like to win—and how to enter. One winner will be selected at random from all the entries.

Hurry! The entry deadline is midnight ET Monday, Dec. 10!

Genealogy books | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Wednesday, December 05, 2012 10:31:19 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 29, 2012
10 Best Genealogy Gifts for the Holidays
Posted by Beth

Is hard-to-buy-for Aunt Helen the repository for recipes, photo albums and keepsakes? Does Grandpa Joe archive all of your family's facts and dates in his head—not to mention all those lesser-known scintillating tidbits? If you need holiday gift ideas for your genealogically inclined relatives, look no further!

Click here for Family Tree Magazine's 10 must-have items to help discover, preserve and celebrate your family's history, making you the family hero in the process. (And, you can always get a gift for yourself and just wrap it for the big day!)


Genealogy books | saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Thursday, November 29, 2012 9:13:39 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, July 27, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, July 23-27
Posted by Diane

  • I wanted to point you to the Ancestry Insider's interesting post about indexing errors on 1940 census websites. The Ancestry Insider has seen more user complaints about Ancestry.com's index than FamilySearch's, and I'd have to echo that observation (mostly in blog comments and on Facebook). His post includes Ancestry.com's answers to questions about its indexing and auditing processes, and the index augmentation that helps users find records despite indexing difficulties.  
  • This fall, the National Archives will open its new New York City location in Lower Manhattan, in the Alexander Hamilton US Custom House at One Bowling Green (the former facility was on Varick Street in Greenwich Village). The new location will expand the facilitiy's usefulness for research and education, with a welcome center, research center, learning center for school groups, exhibition space and public programs area. Read more about the new location here.
  • Military records subscription site Fold3 has released a new collection of Navy Casualty Reports, 1776-1941, documenting deaths of US Navy personnel in wartime and in accidents outside of war.

    The casualty reports include records of those who were killed, injured, wounded, diseased or imprisoned, but most report only deaths.The records include four titles: Deaths Due to Enemy Action (includes deaths during the Civil War aboard the Cincinnati and in Andersonville prison, and more), Drowning Casualties (1885-1939), Lost and Wrecked Ships, Explosions and Steam Casualties (1801-1941), and Ordnance Accidents, Aviation Accidents, and Miscellaneous Records. This collection is currently free to search.


Ancestry.com | census records | Female ancestors | Fold3 | Genealogy books | Military records | NARA
Friday, July 27, 2012 2:36:03 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Call for Pictures of Ancestors! You Could Win Our Family Photo Detective Book!
Posted by Diane

photo-detective Would you like to win a copy of our forthcoming book Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries, and see your ancestors' faces in Family Tree Magazine?

Send us your favorite old family photo by Monday, June 4, and you could be the big winner (your photos may even appear in the book). Here's what the outside of the book looks like:
 


Inside Family Photo Detective, historical photography and genealogy expert Maureen A. Taylor will show you how to add names and stories to the faces in your old family photos. You'll learn how to use the clues in clothing, hairstyles, background and photographer's marks to identify when and where old photographs were taken. Case studies will show you how to apply photo-identification techniques to your family photos and combine photo evidence with your research in historical records.

The book will include a timeline of photography methods and styles, a decade-by-decade overview of fashion trends for men and women, and worksheets to record discoveries about family photos.

To send us your photo, e-mail it to us or post it to our Facebook page by Monday, June 4.

Note that by submitting your photo, you affirm that you are the owner of the image and it is not subject to copyright by any other party. You also grant Family Tree Magazine permission to crop the digital image as necessary for publication, and to use the image in any and all print and electronic media.

Questions? Comment here or e-mail us.



Genealogy books | Photos
Tuesday, May 22, 2012 2:42:34 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Wednesday, May 02, 2012
How to Savor Your Family's Food History and Save Favorite Recipes
Posted by Diane

I'm in love with our newest book, From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Family Recipes by Gena Philibert-Ortega.

Before you even open the book, it's pretty: Hardbound, with a lovely cover and a cute yellow ribbon bookmark.

From the Family Kitchen book

And then it's about food history and family recipes, a topic that fascinates me.

From the Family Kitchen book

Who better to describe the book than its author? Here's what Gena has to say about this labor of love:

Do you ever wish you knew more about your ancestors’ lives? When I think of my ancestors, I wonder how their lives were similar to mine. I also ponder what I can add to my genealogy research that will be meaningful to future generations. 

From the Family Kitchen will help you understand and appreciate your ancestors’ everyday lives by exploring the foods they ate. These details make your family history more vivid and more interesting to younger folks—not to mention very tasty. 

This isn’t just another guidebook. It’s a keepsake designed to help you gather and preserve your family’s food traditions, past and present. You can use From the Family Kitchen to:

1. Learn where to find recipes Great-grandma would've cooked. I’ll walk you through the history of American foodways, and introduce you to resources for researching the food traditions of specific eras and regions. The book even includes historical recipes, cooking instructions and entertaining advice to give you a flavor of your ancestors’ experiences. 

From the Family Kitchen book

2. Better understand the foods of immigrant ancestors. Your family’s food traditions today might still reflect your ancestors’ cultural heritage—but how have those dishes changed over generations and across countries? I’ll explain how to find out.

3. Interview your family about their food memories. Get tips for gathering recipes and recollections. The book includes dozens of suggested questions to ask. 

4. Record your family food traditions. Within the book are beautiful recipe journal pages for preserving the dishes you discover in your research, and especially today’s family favorites—creating a legacy for future generations. 

From the Family Kitchen book

This is Diane again. This hardcover book is a great addition to your genealogy or cooking bookshelf, and it makes a wonderful Mother’s Day gift. You can order From the Family Kitchen from ShopFamilyTree.com on sale for a short time, for $22.39. 

Bon appétit!


Genealogy books | saving and sharing family history | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales | Social History
Wednesday, May 02, 2012 1:31:57 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Thursday, April 26, 2012
Access a Library of Genealogy Resources With Family Tree Magazine's New E-Books Site
Posted by Diane


If you love getting your genealogy how-to help and guidance digitally, we've come up with a convenient way for you to access Family Tree Magazine's library of genealogy resources.

It's our new Family Tree Magazine E-Books website. With one subscription, you'll get access to hundreds of genealogy books and magazine articles that can teach you how to research your family tree and get the most out of your genealogy hobby.

The e-books (see the available titles here) cover genealogy, history, heirloom identification, sharing and preserving your family history, and more. You'll also get dozens of information-packed issues of Family Tree Magazine.

Use the library anytime online on your computer. (E-book reader apps for Android and iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch support are coming soon!)

This demo video shows you how the site works and the e-reader's features (you even can bookmark places in the text and take notes, and save your bookmarks and notes).

For $79.99 per year, you'll have an entire online library of genealogy resources full of new tips and tricks for discovering your roots.


Editor's Pick | Genealogy books
Thursday, April 26, 2012 12:24:50 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, April 24, 2012
10 Reasons to Visit Family Tree Magazine at the NGS Conference!
Posted by Diane

We at Family Tree Magazine are super-excited our Cincinnati hometown will be the center of so much family history enthusiasm at the National Genealogical Society 2012 conference.

Here are 10 reasons to visit us in exhibit hall booth 432:

1. Ask what goetta is (hint: you might find it on a menu). Or you could cheat and read this blog post.

2.
Pick up a free copy of the May/June 2012 Family Tree Magazine featuring our Cincinnati research guide plus our complete 1940 census guide, Greek genealogy primer, guide to tracing Jewish ancestors, and more.

3.
Ask about local resources we’ve used to research our own Cincinnati ancestors.

4.
Meet the author of My Life & Times: A Guided Journal for Collecting Your Stories, Sunny Jane Morton, Friday, May 11, 2 to 3 p.m.

5. Browse our newest family history books including the Genealogist's Census Pocket Reference, Discover Your Family History Online, From the Family Kitchen and Family History Detective.

6.
Pick up favorites such as our Organize Your Genealogy Life! CD, Family Tree Magazine 2011 Annual CD, My Family History Research Planner and more.

7.
See what we have for helping you trace German ancestors (Germans were about 60 percent of Cincinnati's population by 1900) and African-American Ancestors (Cincinnati was a Great Migration destination in the 1900s).

8.
Drop your name in our fabulous door prize drawing.

9.
Take advantage of show specials for Family Tree Magazine subscriptions and renewals.

10.
Ask for directions to our excellent Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County or the nearest place to sample Cincinnati chili.


Family Tree Magazine articles | Genealogy books | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 4:32:03 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Monday, March 19, 2012
Essential Census Tips and Facts at Your Fingertips
Posted by Diane

Just in time for the 1940 census hoopla to start, our new Genealogist's Census Pocket Reference puts resources, tips, lists and need-to-know facts for searching all US censuses right at your fingertips, in a handy book that's also very cute (it really does fit in your pocket).

Genealogist's Census Pocket Reference

The Genealogist's Census Pocket Reference includes
  • websites with census records and their coverage

  • questions from each US census, 1790 through 1940

  • maps of the territory covered in each federal census

  • a key to common abbreviations in census records

  • instructions given to enumerators for each census (which affects how they were to record your ancestors' information)

  • US population and immigration trends revealed in census records

  • explanations of special nonpopulation census schedules

  • resources for state and international censuses

The Genealogist's Census Pocket Reference is now available. Learn more about it in ShopFamilyTree.com.


census records | Genealogy books
Monday, March 19, 2012 10:13:52 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, March 07, 2012
A Peck and a Pottle: Re-creating Family Recipes
Posted by Diane

Have you ever tried to make a cake or a kugel just like Mom or Grandma used to make? (Or, even harder, just like your husband's mom or grandma used to make?)

A recent Wall Street Journal article profiles several cooks who managed to recreate family recipes by doing these things:
  • Developing a flavor profile describing how the dish tastes, what the consistency was, etc.

  • Running recipes by family members for their input.

  • Scouring old cookbooks for potential recipes.

  • Listing ingredients the original cook would have used by considering her tastes and financial means (some ingredients would've been too expensive for everyday use).

  • Finding out what ingredients were available in the time and place. Old cookbooks from local churches and women's clubs are great for this.

  • Using the same tools as the original cook, including rotary egg beaters instead of a fancy stand mixer and old loaf pans instead of today's nonstick ones.

If you're recreating family recipes, you'll also want to refer to our list of old measurements and their modern equivalents.

Our book From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preerve Favorite Recipes by Gena Philibert-Ortega, now available for pre-order in ShopFamilyTree.com, has tons of advice on finding vintage cookbooks and recreating recipes.

From the Family Kitchen also covers the social history of food and contains a recipe journal so you can write down how to make Mom's delicious banana bread. 


Family Recipes | Genealogy books | Social History
Wednesday, March 07, 2012 4:07:35 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 02, 2012
Search Thousands More Family Histories on FamilySearch.org
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch has moved its online books collection from the Brigham Young Family History Archive site to a beta site at books.familysearch.org. (You also can go to FamilySearch.org and click the Books tab.)

Digital book operations manager Dennis Meldrum says approximately 17,700 books were moved, and a backlog of 13,300 books—which wouldn't fit onto the BYU site—were added.

That means you can now search upwards of 31,000 family history books at FamilySearch.org. Another 4,500 will be added this week, with 25,000 more to come during 2012.

You can keyword-search the entire text of the books and download an entire book (instead of one page at a time, as was the case on the BYU site). "We are working to improve the download experience over the coming weeks," Meldrum says.


We're joining in the RootsTech excitement with conference specials for everyone! You'll get 20 percent off select online genealogy titles at ShopFamilyTree.com.



FamilySearch | Free Databases | Genealogy books | RootsTech
Thursday, February 02, 2012 9:07:14 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [6]
# Monday, December 12, 2011
12 Great Genealogy Gifts (for You or Someone Else), Just $12 Each
Posted by Diane

Have you had your eye on some genealogy helps at ShopFamilyTree.com? Are you searching for last-minute gifts?

We've got you covered with 12 great titles for just $12 each! Choose from:

  • 101 Brick Wall Busters: Solutions to Overcome Your Genealogical Challenges book

  • Remember That? A Year-by-Year Chronicle of Fun Facts, Headlines, & Your Memories book (which I think would be great for the person who doesn't need another pair of slippers, but would love if you bring a baked treat, sit for a spell, and go through this book together and reminisce)

  • Family History Detective: A Step-by-Step Guide to Investigating Your Family History book (terrific for someone who wants to start on his or her genealogy)

  • Family Tree Magazine 2011 Annual CD (update your digital Family Tree Magazine library)

  • Family Tree Pocket Reference book

  • Genealogist's Research Trip Planner digital download (I will be consulting this guide to plan my research in Cleveland this April, which will piggyback on a trip to the Ohio Genealogical Society conference April 12-14)

  • German Newspapers in America video class

  • International Genealogy Passport CD

  • Irish Genealogy Online video class

  • Military Research Guide CD (another good gift for a beginner, or for anyone tracing a Civil War, WWII or other military ancestor)

  • Photo Rescue digital download (wonderful for the keeper of your family's photographic heritage)

Get more details on each 12 for $12 goodie on ShopFamilyTree.com.


12 Days of Genealogy | Genealogy books | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales
Monday, December 12, 2011 11:16:34 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, October 04, 2011
Free Family History Month Webinars
Posted by Diane

You’ve been checking out our Family History Month Daily Deal & Giveaway news (five down, 26 to go!), but I wanted to tell you about two more special happenings this month:
Sunny will share tips and ideas for capturing the stories of a lifetime—your own or those of a loved one. Click here to sign up for this webinar
Allen will share essential advice for getting your family history search off the ground. Click here to sign up.

Family History Month | Genealogy books | Webinars
Tuesday, October 04, 2011 4:26:31 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Wednesday, September 28, 2011
Free September Podcast: Tips on PERSI, Old Books, Online Newspapers
Posted by Diane

The newest free Family Tree Magazine Podcast episode with host Lisa Louise Cooke is now available for listening on FamilyTreeMagazine.com or through iTunes. 

Here’s what’s on tap for this edition:

  • tips for searching online newspaper collections
  • what PERSI is and why you should use it
  • finding historical books on the web
  • News From the Blogosphere

New to podcasts? Cooke explains here what podcasts are and how to use them


Family Tree Magazine's Podcast

↑ Grab this Headline Animator



Genealogy books | Newspapers | Podcasts | Research Tips
Wednesday, September 28, 2011 8:54:07 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, September 15, 2011
Blast From the Past
Posted by Diane

Wondering what hot topics your grandparents discussed with the neighbors, or what tunes your mom whistled as a teen? Want to flesh out your family's story with facts about everyday life? Enjoy reminiscing about days gone by?

Our book Remember That? A Year-by-Year Chronicle of Fun Facts, Headlines and Your Memories, by Allison Dolan and the editors of Family Tree Magazine, is an accounting of the whos, whats, whens and wheres of the 20th century:

  • In 1930, the average annual income was $1,612, milk cost 65 cents a gallon and a home cost $7,146.
  • In 1938, a devastating hurricane hit the Northeast coast.
  • Sales of women's trousers skyrocketed in 1942.
  • Perry Como crooned “Some Enchanted Evening” in 1949.
  • Special K cereal and Crest toothpaste hit shelves in 1955.
  • The FCC chairman called TV a “vast wasteland” in 1961. 

The facts keep coming for each year from 1930 all the way through 2010, categorized into top headlines, prices, government affairs, new products, pop culture phenomena, hit music, popular TV shows and more. It also has pages where you can record your own family milestones and favorites.

You also can download our free "My Life In ..." form from our website that lets you describe your own favorites—clothes, hair, music and more—from three big years in your life (you’ll need to enter your name and e-mail address to access the form). 

Click here to learn more about the book Remember That?.


Editor's Pick | Genealogy books | Social History
Thursday, September 15, 2011 9:38:07 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Thursday, September 08, 2011
FGS Conference Updates
Posted by Diane

It was a long, busy day at the FGS conference, but I do have a couple of updates to share:
  • FamilySearch’s Dennis Meldrum gave me a demo of the soon-to-be-launched new Family History Archives website.

The Family History Archives, now hosted on the Brigham Young university libraries site, lets you search the text of nearly 18,000 family and local history books. But the collection is outgrowing the BYU site, and a backlog of digitized books are waiting to be put online. 

The new site will launch in about a month and a half, says Meldrum, with around 45,000 books from the Family History Library and a half-dozen other libraries. You already can try out the new site in beta at FamilySearch Labs

The new search has one field where you enter a name, subject, author, keyword or any combination of these. You’ll download the entire book that matches your search results, then you can use a PDF viewer for finding your search terms within the book.

  • If you’re researching ancestors in Sweden, you’ll want to explore a site called Lantmäteriet.se. This free site from the Swedish land registration authority (comparable to the US Bureau of Land Management General Land Office) has digitized historical maps and property records, for a total of 3 million maps and 70 million pages of text from the years 1628 to 1927.

I got just a quick demo of this site, but it’s one you could spend a lot of time on. You search by county, municipality and place, and get back maps and records for that place. (The advanced search lets you add more parameters, such as dates.) You’ll need the free DjVu plugin to view the maps. You can click Buy to order a download of the map.

There’s an English version of the maps search, but I found I had to use Google translation tools to read the information about the collection


FamilySearch | Genealogy books | International Genealogy
Thursday, September 08, 2011 11:06:56 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Monday, June 13, 2011
Father's Day Gifts for Family History-Minded Dads
Posted by Diane


Apparently, dads get the short end of the parental appreciation stick. According to the National Retail Federation, Americans will spend an average of $106.49 on their dads this year. Mother’s Day spending averaged $140.73 (but this gap has narrowed in recent years).

So in the interest of fairness this Father’s Day, Sunday, June 19, I browsed around for some ideas for a dad who likes family history. (I’m dying to include what my little Leo is giving his daddy, but I’m afraid of spoiling his surprise, so I’ll show and tell after Sunday.)

  • A framed picture of dad with his kids or grandkids, or dad as a youngster with his dad, is a classic. Or I’ve heard about moms taking pictures of the wee ones wearing dad’s or grandpa’s shoes, tie and hat, and adding a frame. 
  • If you’ve been doing genealogy research, put together some of the items you’ve found into an album (here are some ideas), or burn a CD.

Editor's Pick | Genealogy books | Genealogy fun
Monday, June 13, 2011 5:03:57 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [3]
# Friday, June 03, 2011
150 Years Ago Today in the Civil War: Battle of Philippi
Posted by Diane

This June 3, 1861, battle, which resulted in a Union victory, was part of a campaign by Maj. Gen. George McClellan, then commander of the Department of Ohio, to protect mostly pro-Union western Virginia and secure railroad bridges.

What may be the first battlefield amputations were performed on the Confederate side. Horrible as it was, this common battlefield surgery, which generally took about 15 minutes, saved many lives, according to Michael O. Varhola in the book Life in Civil War America

One of the patients was 18-year-old James E. Hanger, who lost his leg. After returning home, he crafted an artificial leg from barrel staves with a hinge at the knee. He was commissioned to manufacture prosthetic limbs for other wounded soldiers and patented his device. He founded what is now the Hanger Orthopedic Group, still a leading manufacturer of artificial limbs.


Civil War | Genealogy books
Friday, June 03, 2011 9:52:20 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, April 29, 2011
This Week's Life in Civil War America Winner!
Posted by Diane

Congratulations to Malina Duff, the final winner of our Life in Civil War America book sweepstakes. Here’s her entry:


Thanks everyone for telling us about your Civil War ancestors as part of this giveaway—we've enjoyed reading your stories!

There’ll be many opportunities to learn more about your family's experiences as the Civil War sesquicentennial commemoration continues. We’re looking forward to sharing them with you.


Genealogy books | Military records
Friday, April 29, 2011 3:20:42 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, April 04, 2011
Share Your Family Recipes and Food Traditions
Posted by jamie

Food is a key ingredient in every family's history: Dad's Saturday morning pancakes, the marzipan Granny served every Christmas, your Sicilian great-great-grandmother's spaghetti sauce recipe. And we want you to share your family's food traditions with us.

Family Tree Books is collecting short essays for a book about real family recipes and the memories that surround them. We'll select eight submissions to feature in the book based on these criteria:
  • Submissions should be between 1,000 and 2,000 words.
  • Essays should tell the story of a real tradition, including:
  • What is the tradition?
  • Who started it and when?
  • What cultural or regional background does the dish or tradition represent? (for example, is it a US regional specialty or a product of your ancestry in Germany, Sweden, Mexico, etc.?)
  • What does the tradition mean to you and your family?
  • Submissions should include the recipe described in the story and a family photo—of the original chef, people described in the story or yourself. (Pictures of the dish itself may be submitted but likely will not be published.)
To enter: E-mail your essay to FTMedit@fwmedia.com with the subject line Family Food Traditions no later than July 13, 2011. To be considered, submissions must adhere to the following specifications:
  • Essays must be in Microsoft Word (.DOC or .RTF) or plain-text format (.TXT). Do not paste your essay into the body of the email.
  • Photos must be in JPG or TIFF format, with a resolution of 300 dpi or higher.
  • Your name, mailing address, phone number and email address must be included in the email message and the essay document.
For full entry details and official rules, click here.


Genealogy books | Genealogy fun
Monday, April 04, 2011 12:59:36 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [7]
# Tuesday, March 29, 2011
Tech Tips with Lisa Louise Cooke: Online Family History Books
Posted by Lisa

Canadian author and genealogist Dave Obee recently opined on his Facebook page, “I've been hearing about the pending death of the book for several years now. One of these days, the prediction might turn out to be true.”

Obee’s comment kicked off an interesting online conversation. For many genealogists, the surge in online books can sound like a threat to the paper tome. But, as with all things, the market drives business and innovation, and the convenience and flexibility of digital books is very appealing. Here are some Tech Tips to help you dive in and reap the benefits of this growing phenomenon:

Get Started
Allison Stacy, editor of Family Tree Magazine, made this great video for getting started with Google Books.

See How Other Genealogists Use Google Books
Miriam Robbins Midkiff, author of the popular genealogy blog AnceStories: The Story of My Ancestors was featured in this video produced by Google.

Search Within a Book
After conducting your initial search and selecting a particular book, you can search within that book by simply typing specific keywords in the search box found in the column on the left side of the book’s page. This box searches only the book currently being viewed and makes quick work of finding a desired surname on individual pages of a large volume. (Find this tip in my new book The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox.)

Keep Up To Date
The Inside Google Books blog is a great way to keep up to date on the latest news at Google Books. Add the RSS feed to your iGoogle page or favorite reader by simply clicking the Feedburner button found in the column on the right.

Google eBooks
Have you noticed that the Google Books homepage looks different these days? That’s because they have introduced the Google eBookstore to the offering. Here’s a terrific little video that explains the benefits of online books in a fun and simple way:

Google eBooks
Don’t skip Google eBooks just because they offer books for sale. Try this handy tip to unearth free gems:

1. Go to Google Books.
2. Click blue Go to the Google eBookstore Now button
3. Type family history in the search box and click the Search All Google eBooks button.
4. Click the Free Only link in the light blue box at the top of the page.
5. You’ll get a results list full of free books, many hard to find self-published family histories.

Look Elsewhere
When it comes to digital family history books, Google Books isn’t the only game in town Check out the Family History Archive, then watch the video below to learn more about how to use this robust resource.

I've had such a great time sharing Tech Tips with you these last 2 months. Thanks for reading, and I hope you'll join me at the free Family Tree Magazine podcast and Genealogy Gems podcast for more lively conversation about genealogy!

—Lisa Louise Cooke


Genealogy books | Genealogy Web Sites | Tech Advice | Videos
Tuesday, March 29, 2011 9:12:39 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Federal Judge Blocks Google Books Expansion
Posted by jamie

Hopes of expanding the already voluminous Google Books collection (7 million books and counting) were shelved by a New York federal district court Tuesday, the ruling citing anti-trust concerns.

Google previously reached a settlement with authors and publishers to digitize and display excerpts of out-of-print books, even if the materials are not in the public domain or explicitly authorized by publishers to appear in Google Books. This agreement was challenged by the Authors Guild and subsequently struck down because it gave Google a virtual monopoly on digitized books. The settlement also raised privacy rights concerns because it would allow Google to track the books users read.

Despite the setback, the current digital collection allows users to search and preview books, periodicals and other materials from libraries and publishers around the world. Google books is an especially useful tool for genealogists, as users can often find complete copies of published genealogies, directories, local histories and other useful materials. (We've bookmarked some of our favorite family history titles in our Google Books library.)

For more on using Google Books for genealogy, read this Genealogy Insider blog post or watch the video below:



Genealogy books
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 9:49:28 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [2]
# Monday, March 14, 2011
Tech Tips by Lisa Louise Cooke: How to Dig for Genealogy Gold
Posted by Lisa

The other day I was flipping through TV channels when I stumbled upon the reality TV show “Gold Rush Alaska.” As I got lured into watching a couple of episodes (they were running a marathon that day), it all looked very familiar:

Huge excavators were pulling up great bucketfuls of material from the ground. The huge volume of earth would then tumble its way down sifting machines, eventually run across a wave table. The ultimate goal was to sift out the gold nuggets.

Then it hit me: That’s what we do with Google!

Yes, more than once after doing a simple search I have felt like a huge bucket full of earth had been dropped on me. I would stare at the hundreds of thousands of results and wonder, “How am I ever going to sift through all this to find my genealogy gems?” (This concept goes right back to the early days when I began the Genealogy Gems Podcast in 2007. My first gem was on Google, and I have frequently featured the search powerhouse on the show ever since.)

On the show, newbie miners were struggling to figure out which specialized tools they needed to sift immense quantities of dirt and rocks down to the type of material that carries the gold -- the fine black dirt. Then they had to use another set of unique tools to sift the fine black dirt in hopes of finding gold nuggets.

So what are the right tools for the job of sifting through the seemingly endless material on the Internet? And how do we get that unwanted material out of the way so we can get down to the good stuff where our genealogy gems may be hidden?

In the first installment of this Tech Tips Blog Series I shared with you one of my favorite “sifters” –- the dot dot dot (…) technique. But that is just one of a cache of search sifting tools -- known in the search world as operators -- available to family history researchers. Let me share a few more favorites from my new book The Genealogist's Google Toolbox (Genealogy Gems Publications)

Understand the underlying concept: Search is art, not a science!
While search operators behave scientifically and logically, we must construct our search queries artfully. Sometimes it’s what you add in, and sometimes it’s what you leave out, that determines the quality of your results.

Exact phrase sifter
When you want to find an exact phrase in a website, enclose the phrase in quotation marks. For example, “U.S. federal census” will bring up websites with that exact phrase and eliminate all other variations.

Words apart search
While quotation marks can help you zero in, in some cases they may actually prevent the ideal results. (There’s that “art” thing again.)

We have to keep in mind that sometimes the words that we are looking for won’t appear next to each other even though they normally do. For example, you may be looking for a city directory, and normally you would expect to see the two words together as a phrase: city directory. But by using an asterisk to set them apart, you may find the perfect result that searching for them together may have missed.

city * directory

Results could include:

city phone directory

city telephone directory

city and county directory

Related Search
For this little gem, watch my video from the Genealogy Gems YouTube Channel.

I hope these gems bring you a family history strike! Good luck!


Genealogy books | Podcasts | Research Tips | Tech Advice
Monday, March 14, 2011 11:24:56 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, January 19, 2011
More in Store
Posted by Diane

We’ve added on to our ShopFamilyTree.com genealogy store! You’ll now find many more how-to, reference and other helpful genealogy books.

My favorite way to find stuff I need is to type the name of a place (such as a state or country) or research topic (such as military or photos) into the keyword search box in the top left corner of the store.

If you’re a VIP member, remember to log in (click My Account at the very top of the page) for your 10 percent discount.

Here’s a sampling of what’s new:

  • US State Research Guides: Click a state for a list of our familiar State Research Guides, plus new products related to research in that state.


Editor's Pick | Genealogy books
Wednesday, January 19, 2011 1:48:40 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, January 05, 2011
Book Sheds New Light on Atlantic Slave Trade
Posted by Diane

I came across an article about a book you might be interested in, especially if your ancestors were African slaves or involved in the slave trade.

Between 1492 and about 1820, four enslaved Africans left the Old World for every European migrant. According to Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade by David Eltis and David Richardson, we know more about this forced migration than about European migration during the time. That’s because the slave trade generated profits, which usually meant record-keeping.

The book is based in part on the data in the online Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, which Eltis co-edited, containing information on 35,000 slave voyages from Africa to the Americas. (Read our post about the database's online debut in 2008.)

Detailed maps in the book show how almost every port in the Atlantic world at the time organized and sent out a slave voyage. Almost half of those voyages came from ports in the Americas.

The data let the authors determine trading patterns, for example, the United States drew more slaves from the area of Senegambia south to Liberia (on Africa’s west coast) than did any other part of the Americas. The authors also found the slave trade was going strong at the time it was finally suppressed.

The book also gives you a more personal look at the trade with information about people and conditions on board the ships, as well as writings from and images of a few passengers. You can read more about it in the article here, and find it listed on Amazon.com here

For help researching African-American roots, see the articles in our online toolkit. Find eight steps to get started tracing slave ancestors here.


African-American roots | Genealogy books
Wednesday, January 05, 2011 1:07:12 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Saturday, December 18, 2010
12 Days of Genealogy: Family Tree Sourcebook
Posted by Diane

On the sixth day of Christmas, my genea-Santa gave to me … The Family Tree Sourcebook: The Essential Directory of American County and Town Resources.

The Family Tree Sourcebook, a second edition of The Family Tree Resource Book for Genealogists, contains updated information on county-based records such as vital records, land records, probate records and more. You can look up a US county and find formation dates, parent counties, official contact information and websites, and available records and their start dates. 

You’ll also find a how-to article and books, organizations and websites for each state, as well as a listing of national genealogical sites and organizations.

And, the book comes with a month of searchable online access through a Family Tree Magazine Plus membership.

Click here to get yourself a copy of The Family Tree Sourcebook (on sale now at 33 percent off!).


12 Days of Genealogy | Genealogy books
Saturday, December 18, 2010 6:19:13 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Thursday, December 16, 2010
12 Days of Genealogy: Family Tree Legacies
Posted by Diane

On the fourth day of Christmas, my genea-Santa gave to me … Family Tree Legacies!

The book Family Tree Legacies: Preserving Memories Throughout Time is great for beginners, newlyweds or anyone who’s ready to create a lasting family keepsake from their genealogy information. You can get a good look at what’s inside the book in this blog post

It comes with how-to information and pages for recording family information of all kinds, plus a CD so you can print extras. You can download the Military Service Record, for writing about ancestors who served their country, as a free PDF from FamilyTreeMagazine.com

Click here to order Family Tree Legacies from ShopFamilyTree.com


12 Days of Genealogy | Genealogy books
Thursday, December 16, 2010 4:26:58 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, May 04, 2010
Resources for Revolutionary War Soldiers and Criminal Research
Posted by Diane

Our own Photo Detective Maureen A. Taylor’s book, The Last Muster: Images of the Revolutionary War Generation (Kent State University Press), is so new she only had one to bring to the National Genealogical Society conference last week.



The book is full of rare daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and carte des visite paper photographs of Revolutionary War-era men and women in their later years. You’ll also find genealogical information about each person.

Taylor is also the author of Uncovering Your Ancestry Through Family Photographs (Family Tree Books), now on sale at ShopFamilyTree.com.

Last week, we showed you one character making the rounds at the conference. Another one was Ron Arons, founder of Criminal Research Press, who appeared both in gangster getup (below) and prison stripes.



He’s written WANTED! U.S. Criminal Records: Sources & Research Methodology and The Jews of Sing Sing. His website has a search of Jewish inmates of New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility, which was a temporary home to Arons’ great-grandfather.

For help researching criminals, also see the November 2009 Family Tree Magazine.

Genealogy books | Photos
Tuesday, May 04, 2010 9:11:58 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, March 03, 2010
We're Bundled Up
Posted by Diane

…. and we don’t mean because of the weather.



We took our CDs, books and webinars that offer genealogy help with three of the topics you’re most interested in, packaged them up into themed “bundles” and discounted them to give you a great deal. Three bundles are available at ShopFamilyTree.com:
  • The Organized Genealogy Bundle: Organize Your Genealogy Life! CD, Organization Made Easy webinar recording, Organize Now! book, 2010 Family Tree Magazine Desktop Calendar
You'll find more details on the contents of each bundle in ShopFamilyTree.com.

Editor's Pick | Family Heirlooms | Genealogy books | Research Tips
Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:40:40 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, November 18, 2009
Editors Pick: Family Tree Legacies
Posted by Diane


Family Tree Magazine editor Allison Stacy and I talked about everything we’d want in one of those “record your family history” books, and Family Tree Legacies: Preserving Memories Throughout Time is the result. We’re a little biased, but we love how well-organized, versatile and pretty it is (and we think it would make a good Christmas or wedding gift).



This book is a three-ring binder with blank fill-in pages for all kinds of information, and a CD in the back that has printable versions of all the fill-in pages.



Lovely tabbed separators divide the book into themed sections, each focusing on a different type of family history information.



Sections let you record details about your immediate family, extended family, memories and traditions, photographs, family heirlooms, relatives who served in the military, newspaper articles featuring family members, places that are prominent in your family history, family recipes and important dates.

Each section begins with tips and tricks (the one below gets you started finding newspaper articles about your family members) . . .



. . . and then has specially designed pages to record information. The pages below are in the Family Heirlooms section.



There’s also an introduction with 10 steps to discovering your family history and a reference guide with helpful references, websites and books. We also love the fold-out family tree chart (below).



You can use the stickers to mark historical family events in the calendar section, maps in the Places section and more.



We’re hoping Family Tree Legacies will become a keepsake you can pass on to future generations. 

Celebrating your heritage | Family Heirlooms | Genealogy books
Wednesday, November 18, 2009 5:09:46 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [3]