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# Monday, November 25, 2013
Tips to Find and Share Old Family Recipes
Posted by Diane



Food takes center stage at the holidays, when many families enjoy old recipes passed down from grandmas and great-grandmas. Occasions such as Thanksgiving, Hannukah, Christmas and Kwanzaa are ideal times to gather up family recipes, find out relatives' memories about the dishes, and share them.

Collect and share old family recipes with these guidelines and our Preserving Family Recipes Value Pack:
  • contact relatives near and far and ask them to contribute their family recipes, or their favorite memories of foods they ate on special occasions

  • Host a potluck dinner or family reunion. Invite family members to bring their favorite dishes, along with the recipes, to a holiday dinner or reunion.

  • Take a picture of each relative along with the dish he or she brought.

  • Ask relatives what they remember eating on special occasions, and for their memories of the dish.

  • You can create a simple recipe book with recipes, stories and inserted photos in Word. Make copies at a copy shop (where you can have it spiral bound if you want). Or use an online photo book service; many of which have pre-designed templates especially for creating recipe books.

  • You also could create recipe cards (using a template such as this) and give them in recipe boxes.

  • Invite family members over to cook together. It's a nice way to learn a special recipe from the expert and/or teach it to the next generation. Take photos or record the process. If you need help with old measurements, get our free, printable conversion chart (it's pretty enough to double as frameable kitchen art).

  • If you don't have family recipes, books like these and these about ethnic and historical cooking can help you learn about what your ancestors probably ate.

The Preserving Family Recipes Value Pack gives you a nicely discounted price on our From the Family Kitchen book plus video and written lessons on researching and sharing your family's food history. Get yours while they last in ShopFamilyTree.com.


Family Recipes | Social History
Monday, November 25, 2013 8:49:42 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, October 09, 2012
Coming Soon: The Genealogy Event
Posted by Diane

A brand-new genealogy event is happening soon, and it's called, well, the Genealogy Event. The conference, taking place Oct. 26 and 27 in New York City at the Metropolitan Pavilion, is full of classes, special events and exhibits.

And advance tickets to the Genealogy Event cost just $15 per day! (Click here to order online) On-site tickets cost $20 per day.

The roughly 40 half-hour power-learning sessions cover topics including getting started, genetic genealogy, house history, Irish research, Jewish research, African-American research, family photos, tracing New York ancestors and more. Download a schedule from the website's Attendees page.

Family Tree Magazine is excited to sponsor Past to Apron, a separately ticketed event ($30) that's all about where food meets history. It features a talk by our editorial director Allison Dolan about discovering and sharing your family's food heritage, a giveaway of our beautiful book From the Family Kitchen by Gena Philibert-Ortega (see how pretty it is?)

From the Family Kitchen

and a tasting of the winning dish from the Past to Apron recipe contest (now concluded; judging has commenced). You can choose from sessions at 4 p.m. Friday and 1 p.m. Saturday; order tickets at the same time you get your tickets to the Genealogy Event.

Genealogy Event exhibitors include companies (such as Family Tree Magazine in booth 406), research organizations and societies. Among those offering specials, Photo Detective Maureen A. Taylor will be offering 15-minute consultations about your mystery photos for a just $30. You can reserve your spot here.

Find out more on the Genealogy Event website and Facebook page.

Family Recipes | Genealogy Events
Tuesday, October 09, 2012 10:41:47 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, September 12, 2012
Spice Up Your Roots: Family History and Food Collide at the Fall Virtual Conference
Posted by Tyler

Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist, author and contributor to Family Tree Magazine. Her primary passions are history and food, which she'll blend together like cake batter at this weekend's Fall Virtual Conference. In this guest post, the author of From the Family Kitchen talks in detail about her VC sessions:

Social history and genealogy go hand in hand. As family history researchers we tend to focus solely on the dates and places of our ancestor’s life. That’s important, but it’s one thing to know the dates and places and another to fully understand what was going on during that historical time period. Social history is the story of people’s everyday lives. Social history places your ancestors in context. It will even help make your research more interesting to the non-genealogists in your family. The session itself is called "Top 10 Tools For Social History", in which we'll talk about resources you can use for any research project. These will include images, online catalogs and collections.

My second presentation, "Cook up Answers About Immigrant Ancestors", is a chance to see social history in action. What does food have to do with your ancestor? Everything! Food is so integral to everything we do in our families. It’s part of celebrations, holidays and even somber events. Food and food history resources can help us learn far more about our ancestors. I can’t wait to tell you about all the available resources, such as community cookbooks.

Please join me at the Virtual Conference. What a great way to spend a weekend. Talking genealogy from the comfort of your own home!


ACT QUICKLY:Only three days until the conference! Register now for the Fall Virtual Conference and save $40 with coupon code FRIENDSOFGENA.



Family Recipes | Family Tree University | Genealogy Events | Social History
Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9:28:10 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, March 07, 2012
A Peck and a Pottle: Re-creating Family Recipes
Posted by Diane

Have you ever tried to make a cake or a kugel just like Mom or Grandma used to make? (Or, even harder, just like your husband's mom or grandma used to make?)

A recent Wall Street Journal article profiles several cooks who managed to recreate family recipes by doing these things:
  • Developing a flavor profile describing how the dish tastes, what the consistency was, etc.

  • Running recipes by family members for their input.

  • Scouring old cookbooks for potential recipes.

  • Listing ingredients the original cook would have used by considering her tastes and financial means (some ingredients would've been too expensive for everyday use).

  • Finding out what ingredients were available in the time and place. Old cookbooks from local churches and women's clubs are great for this.

  • Using the same tools as the original cook, including rotary egg beaters instead of a fancy stand mixer and old loaf pans instead of today's nonstick ones.

If you're recreating family recipes, you'll also want to refer to our list of old measurements and their modern equivalents.

Our book From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preerve Favorite Recipes by Gena Philibert-Ortega, now available for pre-order in ShopFamilyTree.com, has tons of advice on finding vintage cookbooks and recreating recipes.

From the Family Kitchen also covers the social history of food and contains a recipe journal so you can write down how to make Mom's delicious banana bread. 


Family Recipes | Genealogy books | Social History
Wednesday, March 07, 2012 4:07:35 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]