Free Updates

Let us tell you when new posts are added!

Email:

Navigation

Categories
August, 2014 (18)
July, 2014 (16)
June, 2014 (18)
May, 2014 (17)
April, 2014 (17)
March, 2014 (17)
February, 2014 (16)
January, 2014 (16)
December, 2013 (11)
November, 2013 (15)
October, 2013 (19)
September, 2013 (20)
August, 2013 (23)
July, 2013 (24)
June, 2013 (14)
May, 2013 (25)
April, 2013 (20)
March, 2013 (24)
February, 2013 (25)
January, 2013 (20)
December, 2012 (19)
November, 2012 (25)
October, 2012 (22)
September, 2012 (24)
August, 2012 (24)
July, 2012 (21)
June, 2012 (22)
May, 2012 (28)
April, 2012 (44)
March, 2012 (36)
February, 2012 (36)
January, 2012 (27)
December, 2011 (22)
November, 2011 (29)
October, 2011 (52)
September, 2011 (26)
August, 2011 (26)
July, 2011 (17)
June, 2011 (31)
May, 2011 (32)
April, 2011 (31)
March, 2011 (31)
February, 2011 (28)
January, 2011 (27)
December, 2010 (34)
November, 2010 (26)
October, 2010 (27)
September, 2010 (27)
August, 2010 (31)
July, 2010 (23)
June, 2010 (30)
May, 2010 (23)
April, 2010 (30)
March, 2010 (30)
February, 2010 (30)
January, 2010 (23)
December, 2009 (19)
November, 2009 (27)
October, 2009 (30)
September, 2009 (25)
August, 2009 (26)
July, 2009 (33)
June, 2009 (32)
May, 2009 (30)
April, 2009 (39)
March, 2009 (35)
February, 2009 (21)
January, 2009 (29)
December, 2008 (15)
November, 2008 (15)
October, 2008 (25)
September, 2008 (30)
August, 2008 (26)
July, 2008 (26)
June, 2008 (22)
May, 2008 (27)
April, 2008 (20)
March, 2008 (20)
February, 2008 (19)
January, 2008 (22)
December, 2007 (21)
November, 2007 (26)
October, 2007 (20)
September, 2007 (17)
August, 2007 (23)
July, 2007 (17)
June, 2007 (13)
May, 2007 (7)

Search

Archives

<August 2014>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

More Links








# Thursday, June 26, 2014
Free Canadian Genealogy Records on Ancestry.ca Through July 1
Posted by Diane

Are you researching roots in Canada? Ancestry.ca, the Canadian sister site to Ancestry.com, is offering free Canadian genealogy records now through July 1 at 11:59 p.m. to celebrate Canada Day.



That includes Canadian censuses, voter lists, vital records, military records, passenger lists and more. Some of the site's records, such as border-crossing records and the US and Canada Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s, also pertain to those tracing US ancestors.

Once you run a search and click on a result, you'll be prompted to sign up for a free account in order to view the matching record.

Click here to search the free Ancestry.ca Canadian genealogy collections.

Canadian roots | Free Databases
Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:39:14 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, March 28, 2014
Genealogy News Corral, March 24-28
Posted by Diane

Online registration is now open for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) Conference, happening Aug. 27-30  in San Antonio. Register by July 1 for the early-bird discount. I'm especially excited for this one because my dad's dad's family lived for a time in Texas, although conference sessions—taught by many of the experts whose books, blogs and Family Tree Magazine articles you read—will cover topics to help you research across the United States and abroad. Learn more about the FGS 2014 conference, read the conference blog and register here.

Registration also is open for the Indiana Historical Society's 2014 Midwestern Roots conference, Aug. 1-2 in Indianapolis, Ind. Coincidentally, my dad's mom's family is from the Hoosier State. Among the speakers will be Genealogy Gems' Lisa Louise Cooke (who is presenting a pre-conference Great Google Earth Game Show on July 31), Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Director Curt Witcher, professional genealogist Amy Johnson Crow and other experts. Learn more about the Midwestern Roots 2014 conference and register here.

The Archivist at Pennsylvania's Bethany Children's home, which was established in 1867 and remains in operation today, emailed to let me know that MOcavo has digitized and indexed the home's early records. They're in three collections called Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania, Bethany Children's Home Book of Children One Index, Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania, Bethany Children's Home Book of Children Two Index, and Bethany Children's Home Book of Life Index. On Mocavo, you can search and view records in one collection at a time for free. With a subscription, you can  search and view records from multiple collections simultaneously. Learn more about the Bethany Children's Home records on Mocavo's blog.

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is launching a portal to give you access to photos from residential schools dating from 1885 to 1996. The LAC notes that 150,000 Aboriginal children attended more than 130 residential schools around the country. You already can see 65 photos from schools in Alberta, and you'll be able to find more photos by province or territory as they become available. Descriptions are included with dates, school names and locations when available (so far I haven't found any names of students shown in photos).


Canadian roots | Free Databases | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | Genealogy Web Sites
Friday, March 28, 2014 10:24:00 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 07, 2013
Search Canadian Old Military Records Free Through Nov. 11
Posted by Diane

In honor of Canada’s Remembrance Day, which coincides with Veterans Day in the United States, subscription genealogy website Ancestry.ca is providing free access to more than 4.4 million military records now through Nov. 12.

The records come from the First and Second World War, the Rebellion of 1837 and the War of 1812.

You'll need to register for a free Ancestry.ca account (or log into your account, if you've already set one up) in order to view records that match your search. Learn more about Ancestry.ca's free military records offer and start your search here.

Researching ancestors in Canada? The tools in our our Canadian Genealogy Value Pack (now on sale for $18 off) will get you started. Find Canadian immigration records with our Canadian Immigration Records video class or our Canada Immigration Genealogy Guide download.


Canadian roots | Military records
Thursday, November 07, 2013 9:07:21 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, November 01, 2013
Search Canada's 1921 Census Free on Ancestry.ca
Posted by Diane

Ancestry.ca's free 1921 Canadian census collection is now indexed. That means you can search the records by name and other criteria instead of having to know exactly where your ancestor lived, and then browsing by location. 

The census will be accessible free on Ancestry.ca for at least three years, says spokesperson Matthew Deighton. You'll need to set up a free registration (or log into your account, if you already have one) in order to view the records.

The 1921 Canadian census is the country's most recent census available to the public. It lists everyone in a household and contains details including birthplace (for a person and his or her parents), immigration year and religion, says Family Tree Magazine's Document Detective George G. Morgan.

Morgan will show you clues in the 1921 Canadian census in our January/February 2014 issue, on ShopFamilyTree.com and newsstands Jan. 7.

The 1921 Canadian census also is part of the subscription collection on Ancestry.ca's US sister site, Ancestry.com.


Canadian roots | census records | Free Databases
Friday, November 01, 2013 11:03:33 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, September 27, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, Sept. 23-27
Posted by Diane

  • Origins.net and the Devon Wills Project have compiled a free index of pre-1858 Devon wills, administrations and inventories. Most of the records indexed here were destroyed during World War II in 1942, according to the site, so "the overall aim of this index is to create a finding-aid to enable the researcher to determine what probate materials were originally recorded." You'll get source information for any surviving documents that match your search.  The Devon Wills Project, 1312-1891 is searchable free at Origins.net
  • The free FamilySearch.org records collection has grown by 192 million indexed records and record images from Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Spain, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. Notable US additions include Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933. See the full list of new and updated collections and click through to search or browse them from the FamilySearch News and Press Blog.
  • Subscription genealogy site findmypast.com has launched an Irish Newspaper Collection of nearly 2 million searchable Irish newspaper articles dating as far back as the early-to-mid 1800s . The papers come from the British Library and include The Belfast Morning News, The Belfast Newsletter, The Cork Examiner, The Dublin Evening Mail, The Freeman’s Journal and The Sligo Champion. The collection is available on findmypast.com and with a World subscription on findmypast.com international sites.


Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Free Databases | International Genealogy | Newspapers | UK and Irish roots
Friday, September 27, 2013 2:29:15 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, August 09, 2013
1921 Canadian Census Record Images Free on Ancestry.ca
Posted by Diane

Ancestry.com's Canadian website Ancestry.ca is now offering free access to record images for the 1921 census of Canada.

Ancestry.com is still working on a searchable index, so you'll need to browse the records by place.  Use the Browse This Collection box on the right to choose the province, district and subdistrict where your relatives lived in 1921, then sign up for a free basic account (if you don't already have one) to view the census images.

This census was recently the subject of a petition seeking its release to researchers. The privacy period expired June 1, and the records reportedly had been transferred to the Library and Archives Canada and digitized. But until now, no plans had been announced for their release to the public.

You can read more about the backstory on the 1921 Canadian census release on the Olive Tree Genealogy Blog.

Browse the 1921 census on Ancestry.ca by clicking here.


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots
Friday, August 09, 2013 10:05:21 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, July 12, 2013
Genealogy News Corral, July 8-12
Posted by Diane

An online petition to release the 1921 Canadian census is circulating. You can read more about it and link to it on the Olive Tree Genealogy blog.


Canadian roots | Celebrity Roots | findmypast
Friday, July 12, 2013 10:18:57 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, October 08, 2012
Canadian Genealogy Websites, Tips and Resources
Posted by Diane

Happy Thanksgiving to our friends in Canada! The second Monday in October (that's today) is the holiday when Canadians celebrate the harvest.

The holiday hopped around from Nov. 6 in 1879, to the third Monday in October for many years, until Parliament set the date on the second Monday of October in 1957. You can read more about the history of Canada's Thanksgiving on the Armchair Genealogist blog.

If you've got the day off for Canadian Thanksgiving (or if you're American, for Columbus Day), take some time to trace your Canadian kin with advice from these FamilyTreeMagazine.com articles (all free) and resources from ShopFamilyTree.com:



Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites
Monday, October 08, 2012 11:03:34 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, August 29, 2012
Finding Females and Cramming Canadian Genealogy
Posted by Tyler

In this guest post, Presenter Lisa A. Alzo breaks down her sessions on Canadian immigration records and tracking down evasive female ancestors at the Family Tree University’s Fall 2012 Virtual Genealogy Conference:

Secrets to Tracing Female Ancestors

When I started my genealogy research over 22 years ago, I began with a female ancestor: my maternal grandmother. This was before the Internet and without the luxury of FamilySearch, the Ellis Island Database or Ancestry.com. Nothing like starting out with a challenge! But I used the information available to me—family documents, interviews, church records, court documents and microfilm—as well as made trips to the library and visited the places she had lived. I was thus able to learn the details of her life, which I chronicled in my book Three Slovak Women. In my Virtual Conference session, “Secrets for Tracing Female Ancestors”, I will reveal my secrets for locating and using online and offline resources, and will share other tips and tricks you’ll need to find the elusive women in your family tree!

Canadian Immigration Records

As a child, my family would visit my father’s cousin in Ontario, Canada. At the time I fleetingly wondered why he lived so far away, but never questioned it until I became a genealogist and began tracking down clues about my Alzo ancestors. Curiosity led me to investigate sources in Canada, with some very interesting and surprising results! If you have ancestors who immigrated to Canada (or even think it’s a possibility), then join me for the session Canadian Immigration Records, where I’ll walk you through the basics of searching in the Great White North. You’ll learn about websites, databases and printed resources to help you locate passenger lists, border crossings and other immigration records, as well as search secrets to draw your ancestors out of hiding!

Learn more about the Fall Virtual Conference.

Canadian roots | Family Tree University | Female ancestors | French Canadian roots
Wednesday, August 29, 2012 3:45:13 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Tuesday, August 28, 2012
Our Ancestors' Odd Jobs in Genealogy Records
Posted by Diane

Just in time for Labor Day (or Labour Day, depending which side of the border you live on), Ancestry.com's Canadian genealogy site, Ancestry.ca, offers this list of unusual occupations gleaned from its Canadian census collection (1851-1916):
  • Danise Barzano, living in Ottawa in 1901, gave her occupation as "baseball field" (“terrain de baseball”).
  • Saint John, New Brunswick, resident John Corbett offered his job title as “lunatic keeper” in the 1901 census.
  • Also in 1901, Torontonian Mary Brown was a “pig nurse.”
  • William H. Butler of Ottawa was a “bell hanger” in the 1881 census.
  • Also in 1881, John Dade was working as a “lamp lighter” in Toronto.
  • John Middleton, a 19-year-old resident of Algoma, Ontario, was listed as “criminal” in 1901.
  • The 1901 occupation for Georgia Wilcox, a 38-year-old BC resident, was “idiot”—a historic reference for a patient in an asylum.
You'll find even more odd and archaic job titles in these free FamilyTreeMagazine.com articles:
Interested in learning more about your ancestor's work? Learn how using these resources:


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Family Tree Magazine articles | Research Tips | Social History
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 10:27:04 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, June 27, 2012
Search Canadian Genealogy Records Free Through July 2
Posted by Diane

In honor of Canada Day, which celebrates the July 1, 1867, enactment of the British North American Act uniting three colonies into the country of Canada, Ancestry.ca is offering free access to 40 million historical records today through July 2.
 
The free records cover the years leading up to and following Confederation and come from some of the largest collections on Ancestry.ca, including:
  • Canadian passenger lists and ocean arrivals: These name the masses of people who arrived by ship at port cities across Canada
  • The 1871 Census of Canada: This was the first census Canada conducted as a nation. It reveals household members, ages, jobs, parents' birthplaces and more.
  • Birth, marriage and death records: These come from British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia.
  • Military records: These come from the War of 1812 and World War I, as well as lists of officers from 1832 and 1863 to 1939.
Visit www.ancestry.ca to search the free databases. You'll need to register for a free Ancestry.ca account to view your full search results.


Canadian roots | Free Databases
Wednesday, June 27, 2012 2:10:15 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [4]
# Tuesday, June 12, 2012
War of 1812 Bicentennial: Genealogy Resources
Posted by Diane

Two hundred years ago June 18, President James Madison signed the United States' war declaration against Great Britain, starting the War of 1812.

Contributing to the declaration were British impediments to American trade with France, the impressment of American merchant sailors into Britain's Royal Navy, and Britain's support of American Indian tribes against American expansion into the Old Northwest as a buffer for Canada. Some Americans including Thomas Jefferson even saw the war as an opportunity to acquire Canada.

The war lasted until 1815 and ended in what many historians consider a draw, with neither side gaining or losing significant territory.

Psychologically, though, Americans felt they'd won a second war of independence. Canada successfully repelled US invaders, giving the war a prominent spot in Canadian national consciousness. Great Lakes and Southeast American Indians lost their hold on their lands. Many left, made deals with the US government or were removed to Indian Territory. 

You can learn more about the war and watch PBS' documentary on the network's War of 1812 website.

Find bicentennial events, a timeline, and museum and historic site information at the Official War of 1812 Bicentennial website.

Also check state commemorative websites such as Ohio's War of 1812 and Maryland's StarSpangled200. The Battle of Baltimore, of course, inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the "Star Spangled Banner."

The Navy, which emerged as the key to US defenses, is posting information and commemorative events at OurFlagWasStillThere.org and the War of 1812 Bicentennial Network Facebook page.

If your ancestors fought in the War of 1812, here are some free FamilyTreeMagazine.com articles to start your research:
  • At Your Service: Compare your ancestor's birth date to this chart to see if he might have fought in the War of 1812 (or another war).
  • War of 1812 Records: Our AncestorNews columnist links to several of her favorite, free War of 1812 online databases. (Note that the Library of Virginia database linked on this page is down June 12 due to a power outage at the library.)

Here are some resources from ShopFamilyTree.com that you might find helpful.



Canadian roots | Family Tree Magazine articles | Military records
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 1:43:44 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, May 23, 2012
Canadian Genealogy for Americans
Posted by Diane

Has your genealogy research led you to ancestors in Canada? That's not surprising—folks have been crossing the US-Canadian border for a loooong time. Consider:
  • After the American Revolution, around 35,000 Loyalists headed for Canada's Maritime Provinces.
  • By 1812, about 80 percent of the estimated 100,000 settlers in southern Ontario province were of American origin.
  • Approximately 900,000 French-Canadians emigrated to the United States from 1840 to 1930.
  • As available US land diminished in the late 1880s, Canada's Prairie Provinces saw a massive influx of Americans.
  • Around 1895, when US border-crossing records begin, as many as 40 percent of immigrants to Canada planned to end up in the United States.
  • In 1897, the Klondike Gold Rush spurred a stampede of Americans to the Yukon.

Fortunately for US residents tracing Canadian ancestors, an abundance of resources is available—but where do you start?

Why, with our next webinar, Canadian Genealogy for Americans

Author and lecturer Lisa A. Alzo will introduce you to major Canadian genealogy resources and websites, key record groups and essential history. You'll also receive our digital Canadian Genealogy Guide when you register. 

Here are the Canadian Genealogy for Americans webinar details:

  • Tuesday, June 5, 2012
  • 8 p.m. Eastern (7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain, 5 p.m. Pacific) 
  • Duration: 60 minutes 
  • $49.99 (but register now to save $10!)
  • Registration includes: participation in the live event, access to the recording to watch again as often as you like, a PDF of the presentation slides, our Canadian Genealogy Guide

Our Canadian Genealogy for Americans webinar will enable you to formulate a solid research plan for discovering your Canadian kin. Register at ShopFamilyTree.com.


Canadian roots | French Canadian roots | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales | Webinars
Wednesday, May 23, 2012 1:28:05 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, May 04, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, April 30-May 4
Posted by Diane

  • Canadian historians and genealogists are concerned over the impact of budget cuts on federal libraries and archives. Library and Archives Canada will have to eliminate 20 percent of its workforce, and government libraries housing archival collections in the transport, immigration and public works department will be closed. Read more about the cuts on the CBC News website
  • The National Park Service (NPS) has launched a new Civil War website where you can explore the war and historic sites associated with it. On the home page, you can see a timeline, find NPS sites to visit and link to the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. Click Stories for history about the war; click People for introductions to the era's central figures, and click Places to virtually visit the NPS' war-related sites.


Canadian roots | Civil War | Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives
Friday, May 04, 2012 3:23:55 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, February 16, 2012
Free for a Limited Time: Canadian Vital Records, Japanese Internment Camp Records, 1930 Census
Posted by Diane

Two Ancestry.com sites have limited-time free record offers:
  • Ancestry.com is offering free access to two databases now through Feb. 23 to mark the 70th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, which sent 120,000 Japanese-Americans and residents to internment camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor: 
  • Update: I also just received an Ancestry.com newsletter stating that the site's 1930 US census collection will be free through Feb. 20.

In both cases, you'll need to set up a free account with the site (or log into your existing account) to view record matches.


Asian roots | Canadian roots | census records | Free Databases | Vital Records
Thursday, February 16, 2012 11:33:21 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [7]
# Friday, February 10, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Feb. 6-10
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch has added another 30 million new, free records to its historical records website—16 million indexed names and 14 million browsable images. Highlighting the additions are new databases from Canada, England, Germany, Italy, Micronesia, Slovenia and the United States. The new records also include millions of US births, marriages and deaths, and over 9 million church records from Sweden. See the list of new collections here.
FamilySearch also has launched a free mobile app for the iPad, iPhone and Droid that lets volunteers index digitized records. You can find it by searching for FamilySearch Indexing in the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace.
  • Library and Archives Canada is starting a monthly podcast series called Discover Library and Archives Canada (LAC): Your History, Your Documentary Heritage. Episodes will introduce you to LAC services and archivists. You can subscribe to episodes using RSS or iTunes, or tune in on the LAC website.
  • Genealogists have formed the Family History Information Standards Organisation (FHISO), to develop standards for the digital representation and sharing of family history informaiton. The goal is to make data exchanging work with different genealogy websites, software, applications and other services. FHISO will sponsor the Build a BetterGEDCOM Project, a grassroots effort started last year.

Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Free Databases | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | Historic preservation
Friday, February 10, 2012 3:00:43 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, January 13, 2012
Genealogy News Corral, Jan. 9-13
Posted by Diane

  • All 397 US national parks will offer free admission Jan. 14-16 to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. You can visit the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Georgia, the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail in Alabama, or the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC—just a few of the many national parks that have ties to Dr. King or the Civil Rights movement. 
Use the directory at NPS.gov to find a park.
  • Library and Archives Canada has added digitized images of Upper Canada land petitions (357,831 new images in all) to its website. First search the index here (use the search link at the left; the one on the bottom didn't work for me) to find the microfilm number you need, then use the “microform digitization” research tool to you can browse the image page by page.
  • FamilySearch has added 119 million new, free records to the record search at FamilySearch.org (that includes about 64 million indexed names and 55 million browsable images). They come from more than 30 countries including Australia, the Czech Republic, Italy, Portugal, Sweden and the United States. See the full list of new and updated databases here.

African-American roots | Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Free Databases | Museums | Social History
Friday, January 13, 2012 4:54:31 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [7]
# Friday, December 02, 2011
Genealogy News Corral, Nov. 28-Dec. 2
Posted by Diane

  • Ancestry.com has upgraded its mobile app for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. New features include 99-cent in-app purchasing of individual records for non-Ancestry.com subscribers (such as World War I draft cards, census records, birth and death certificates, and school yearbook photos), the "shaky leaf" hints indicating a possible record match to somone in a user's family tree, and easier updating of family trees with information from historical records.

The app, which boasts more than 1.7 million downloads to date, is free from the Apple App Store.

  • FamilySearch.org has added more than 18 million records from Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, Haiti, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Peru, South Africa, Spain, the United States and Venezuela. US records include a Texas death index (provided by Ancestry.com); naturalization index cards from Louisiana, Texas and Wisconsin; county records from several states and more.

You can view all the new and updated collections and click to each one here.

  • SavingOurs.com is a new volunteer group dedicated to saving historical newspapers and other documents. The organization will work with local volunteers, companies and governments to digitize these documents and ensure they're available free to the public. Visit SavingOurs.com to learn more or volunteer.

  • Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has started a blog as a four-month-long pilot project. It'll offer tips and tools on LAC's records and navigating its website. Posts so far cover war diaries, Royal Canadian Navy ledger sheets, the newly digitized Lord Elgin collection and more. Visit the LAC Blog here.

Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Military records
Friday, December 02, 2011 10:58:54 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, September 07, 2011
FamilySearch Adds to Civil War Records
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch.org added millions of new records this week of both Confederate and Union soldiers who served in the American Civil War.

Those include veterans applications for military headstones, records of headstones for deceased Union veterans, Confederate POW records, registers of homes for disabled soldiers, service records and more.

Also newly added are notarial records from Canada, church records and civil registrations from Mexico, and a variety of records from England.

You’ll find a chart here listing the new collections and linking to the individual databases. Note that not all of the collections are searchable. Indexes haven’t been completed for some, such as U.S., Records of Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861–1865. In that case, you’ll need to browse collections by date or place.


Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Wednesday, September 07, 2011 10:04:00 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [6]
# Friday, August 26, 2011
Genealogy News Corral, August 22-26
Posted by Diane

  • FamilySearch added to collections from seven countries, including 6 million record images from Mexico. Other additions include parish register records from Belgium and England, and church book records from Russia. New records were added from eight US states: Maryland, Montana, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Vermont, and Virginia. Click through to the new and updated collections from here.
  • UK family history site Genes Reunited has released a variety of military records from WW1 and the Second Anglo-Boer War. Collections include Royal Naval Officers' Medal Roll 1914-1920, New Zealand WWI Soldiers, Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-1919, and records with 258,800 names of men and women who fought during the Second Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902.
  • Subscription genealogy site Ancestry.com has expanded its US school yearbook collection, adding nearly 25,000 new yearbooks. It now totals more than 35,000 books with 155 million records from 1884 to 2009. The books come from high schools, junior highs, academies, colleges and universities. They're also are available on the Canadian-focused Ancestry.ca.
  • Jill Barone of St. Petersburg, Fla., won the Red Star Line Museum's "Do You Know This Girl?" social media contest. Barone wins a trip to Antwerp, Belgium, for the official pre-opening festivities of the Red Star Line Museum in May 2012, and a $1,000 shopping spree at Diane Von Furstenberg's Antwerp boutique. The museum will open in spring 2013.

Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites | Military records | Museums | UK and Irish roots
Friday, August 26, 2011 1:14:46 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [5]
# Friday, July 22, 2011
Genealogy News Corral, July 18-22
Posted by Diane

I'm back at it after a short vacation (which involved my first visit to a Civil War battlefield—I'll show and tell next week) to post this week's news roundup. Here goes:
  • The new Black Sea German Research site is for those tracing families who migrated from Germany, Alsace, Poland or Hungary to the Black Sea region of South Russia (now Ukraine) in the early 1800s. Search a database of names, upload your GEDCOM and share historical information at this free, volunteer-run site.
  • NBC is re-running “Who Do You Think You Are?” season 2 episodes Saturday nights this summer. Check your local listings if you missed an episode or want to watch your favorite again.

Canadian roots | Celebrity Roots | German roots | Photos | UK and Irish roots
Friday, July 22, 2011 2:14:46 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [8]
# Wednesday, January 19, 2011
Good News for Canadian Roots Researchers!
Posted by Diane

I’ve heard about some exciting developments for those researching Canadian roots, so I thought I’d lay ‘em out here:

Perhaps most thrilling for Canadian researchers, Library and Archives Canada (LAC), the country’s main repository of historical records, has announced plans to put most of its services online within the next seven years—in time to celebrate the confederation’s 150th anniversary in 2017. That plan includes several goals, among them:

  • Starting this year, you'll be able order digital copies of documents in LAC’s collection; paper copies will be phased out by April.
  • Over the next year, LAC will double the volume of its already exceptional online content, adding millions of genealogy images in partnership with Ancestry.ca (sister site to Ancestry.com).

The Canadiana Discovery Portal is a beta site that lets you search more than 60 million pages of Canadian content from archive collections in libraries, museums, universities and government agencies across the country. Just type a search term, such as a name, place or topic, into the box on the home page. You’ll get digitized books, photos. audio and video You can sort results by relevance or newest/oldest, and filter by language, media (image, audio or video), contributing archive or date range covered.

You can raise your glass to this: Ancestry.ca is honoring the 225th anniversary of Molson Brewery with “mug-rattling” family stories of the Labatt and Molson families, Canada’s most famous brewers. One such tale you can read about in old newspapers: Harry Markland Molson, great-grandson of John Molson, perished with the Titanic in 1912. 

If you're looking for some guidance in your Candian roots research, here are some of Family Tree Magazine’s resources to check out:


Canadian roots | Family Tree Magazine articles | Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives
Wednesday, January 19, 2011 11:55:24 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, December 17, 2010
Genealogy News Corral Dec. 13-17
Posted by Diane

  • Another new database from Library and Archives Canada is Medals, Honours and Awards, containing more than 113,000 references to medal registers, citation cards and records of military awards. It also has digitized images of some medal registers. You can search the database by name, regiment, rank and more; if you find a match, you’ll learn the medal awarded, the related battle or conflict, and a citation for the record containing the information. Because no service files exist for the Canadian military in the 1800s, these records may provide the only proof of service for 19th-century conflicts. 
  • FamilySearch has added nearly four million new digital images—nearly 1.7 million of them indexed—to its historical records collection. The additions include records from South Africa, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Guatemala, the Netherlands and the United States. Visit FamilySearch for a list of the collection titles with the new images, and how many of the records are indexed. Unindexed collections aren’t searchable, instead, you’ll need to browse those collections and view the records to find your ancestor’s name.
  • Richard Heaton e-mailed us about his site called Last Chance To Read, a searchable collection of thousands of pages of scarce British and Irish newspapers and other publications, most printed between 1710 and 1870. Once you register for a free account, you can do a search and order PDF copies of articles for about $4.75 via PayPal. See included titles here (scroll down).  
  • RootsMagic released a free update to version 4, version 4.0.9.8., which update adds several user-requested features and fixes a number of issues. Users may be automatically notified to download the update; if not, open the program and go to Help>Check for Updates or click here.

Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Genealogy Software | Military records | Newspapers | UK and Irish roots
Friday, December 17, 2010 4:06:12 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, November 12, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: Nov. 8-12
Posted by Diane

It’s been a good week for researchers with British and Canadian roots! In this genealogy roundup:
  • In honor of Remembrance Day, Canadian subscription genealogy site Ancestry.ca has added a huge collection of Canadian WWI death and burial records.
Canada, CEF Commonwealth War Graves Registers, 1914-1919 details the circumstances of death for more than two thirds of the 60,000 Canadian soldiers who fought and died in Belgium, France and the United Kingdom. Canada, CEF Burial Registers, First World War, 1914-1919 details temporary and final resting places of soldiers who died.
  • Ancestry.com and UK website Thegenealogist.co.uk have reached an agreement with the UK national archives to publish the 1911 census of England and Wales, the most recent UK census available to the public. The companies will work together to transcribe the census, creating a searchable database. Ancestry.com will add the records by county, starting in late 2010 and finishing up in 2011. (You can search this census now on subscription site 1911census.co.uk, operated by UK genealogy site FindMyPast.co.uk.) 
  • British genealogy subscription site FamilyRelatives.com has added a million records from post office directories. Similar to phone books, these directories name local people and businesses. The growing collection currently covers more than 25 British counties and major cities, and spans nearly a century. Read more on FamilyRelatives.com.
  • British genealogy website FindMyPast.co.uk is working with FamilySearch to post online indexes and images of Welsh parish registers dating as far back as the 16th century.
FamilySearch will digitize about the images containing baptisms, marriages and burials; FindMyPast.co.uk will transcribe them. Over the next two years, you’ll be able to search a free index on FamilySearch, with the records available for a fee on FindMyPast.co.uk. In Wales, users will be able to access the records free through Welsh Archives Services

Canadian roots | census records | Military records | UK and Irish roots
Friday, November 12, 2010 2:26:40 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, July 16, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: July 12-16
Posted by Diane

  • Ancestry.com has completed its acquisition of Genline.se, the leading Swedish family history Web site. Ancestry.com acquired all shares of Genline for approximately 53 million Swedish kronor, about $7.2 million.
  • Ancestry.com also has updated its New Search screen to add maps you can click to browse data collections associated with a state or county, as well as access to your recent searches and recently viewed data collections. To use these features, click the search tab on Ancestry.com’s home page (if you see a New Search link in the upper right, be sure to click it—these updates aren’t in the old search). See more details and screen shots on the Ancestry.com blog.

  • British subscription site FindMyPast.co.uk has made it easier for you to find birth records on the site. More than 100 million records were re-indexed.  Now, your search results will be in a list of individual names, rather than a range, so you won’t have to view pages and pages of records in order to find your ancestor. In the advanced search, you can now search records from one or more counties. Search FindMyPast.co.uk birth records here. Fully indexed marriage and death records should follow later this year.
  • Subscription site Ancestry.ca has launched 16.3 million Parisian birth, marriage and death records dating from 1700 to 1907. French is the second most common ancestry in Canada. Use these links to access the records:
Paris, France & Vicinity Marriages, 1700-1907
Paris, France & Vicinity Births, 1700-1899
Paris, France & Vicinity Deaths, 1707-1907

Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Genealogy Industry | Newspapers | UK and Irish roots
Friday, July 16, 2010 1:58:26 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, May 28, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: May 24-28
Posted by Diane

Library and Archives Canada has begun adding digitized copies of service files to its database of more than 600,000 men and women who enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) during World War I as soldiers, nurses and chaplains. When a photocopy or digital copy is requested, the file will be scanned and the digital images added to the database.

Subscription genealogy site Archives.com has provided all 9,000 members of the National Genealogical Society (NGS) a three-month membership. (Those who join NGS during the next six months also can take advantage of this offer.)  Archives.com also has added The Dictionary of American Family Names to its databases, letting members look up the origins of more than 70,000 US surnames. Read more about both developments on the Archives.com blog.

As mentioned in yesterday’s post about military research, subscription site World Vital Records is making its military records collection free through June 1. You’ll find more information in the site’s announcement.

This was a fun post on the National Archives blog: The staff compares modern facial hair standards for members of the US Army (only men can have it!) with photos of Civil War US Army officers whose mustaches might get them reprimanded today.


Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites | Military records | NARA
Friday, May 28, 2010 10:35:36 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, May 07, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: May 3-7
Posted by Diane

  • The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) plans to launch a public wiki that will allow you to create pages on records or themes. If you can't attend the organizing meeting at the NARA building in Washington, DC, on May 7th, you can contribute ideas by e-mail—see the archives’ blog post for details.
Also check out the archives’ wiki for planning the wiki.


Asian roots | Canadian roots | NARA
Friday, May 07, 2010 3:21:09 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, March 26, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: March 22-26
Posted by Diane

Tonight is Matthew Broderick’s big night on “Who Do You Think You Are?” Looks like we’ll see some parallels between Broderick’s character, Robert Gould Shaw, in the 1989 movie Glory (which I love) and the actor’s real-life Civil War ancestors. Tune in at 8 pm/7 pm central.

You can follow the National Archives' upcoming Civil War sesquicentennial (I love that word!) exhibit on Twitter. Tweets will highlight people and stories of the Civil War and link to images of items in the exhibition. Part I will be open April 30 to Sept. 6; Part II will be open Sept. 10 to April 11 of next year.

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is holding its 27th annual Gene-O-Rama Conference—themed Researching Your Female Ancestors—this weekend. You can register at the door for $40 (members) or $45 (non members). Get more information on the society’s website.

Ancestor Seekers, a company that provides research services and organizes genealogy trips to Salt Lake City, has started a fundraiser program for genealogical societies. Guests attending a trip can request to have 5 percent of the fee go to a participating society. Interested societies can contact Ancestor Seekers for more information.


"Who Do You Think You Are?" | Canadian roots | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | Libraries and Archives
Friday, March 26, 2010 1:09:56 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, January 15, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: January 11-15
Posted by Diane

  • Ancestry magazine, published for 25 years by Ancestry.com, will be discontinued after the March/April 2010 issue. For more information, see the staff's message on the magazine’s website.
  • In case you missed it, NBC has announced that the US version of "Who Do You Think You Are?" will air Friday, March 5, at 8 p.m.


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Genealogy Events | Genealogy societies | Videos
Friday, January 15, 2010 3:36:48 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, December 04, 2009
Genealogy News Corral: Nov. 30-Dec. 4
Posted by Diane

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has posted some of its digital images from World War I on photo-sharing site Flickr. Images show soldiers, nurses, battles, posters and more. Get more details about LAC’s WWI photo collection on its website.

Two new online videos you might want to take a peek at:
The National Archives and Records Administration’s NARAtions blog is running a “Family History Friday” series, which explains a different genealogical record or resource each week. This week, read about seamen’s protection certificates, a kind of early passport mariners purchased to identify their nationality in case of impressments by the British.

If you’re planning to create family photo gifts for the holidays, keep an eye on sites such as Snapfish and Shutterfly. Snapfish is running a deal a day through Dec. 25; Shutterfly also has a bunch of sales. Feel free to click Comments and add other photo bargains you know of.


African-American roots | Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Libraries and Archives | Photos
Friday, December 04, 2009 3:18:20 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, July 24, 2009
Genealogy News Corral: July 20-24
Posted by Diane

This week sure flew by, didn’t it? Here’s our news news roundup:
  • New records this week on the free FamilySearch Record Search Pilot  include an index to Cheshire, England, Non-conformist records (1671 to 1900), and index to the 1895 Minnesota state census, and images for the 1905 New York state census (the index is still in progress).
New indexing projects are underway for Italy, New Zealand, Perú and the United States; volunteers who can help with foreign language projects are needed. Go to the FamilySearch Indexing site for more information.
  • The International Association of Jewish Genealogists conference is coming right up Aug. 2-7 in Philadelphia. Besides genealogy classes and an exhibit hall, you can use a Resource Room stocked with research materials and computers. Extracurriculars include walking tours, bus tours and cemetery research trips. Visit the conference Web site for registration information.
  • Ancestry.com has upgraded its “hinting engine” for FamilyTreeMaker. Now a faster, higher-capacity engine will automatically search Ancestry.com and display a leaf next to a name in FamilyTreeMaker's pedigree and detail views if there's a potential match. The new engine also searches Ancestry Member Trees instead of One World Tree data.


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | FamilySearch | Free Databases | Genealogy Events | International Genealogy | Jewish roots
Friday, July 24, 2009 2:25:54 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, July 01, 2009
Search Canadian Passenger Lists Free Through July 3
Posted by Diane

To celebrate Canada Day, subscription genealogy data service Ancestry.ca—the Canadian sister site to Ancestry.com—is making its collection of passenger lists from Canadian ports free through July 3.

The lists cover 1865 to 1935 and include names of more than 5.6 million individuals. An estimated 37 percent of Canada’s population has ancestors in the lists. US residents also may have relatives who arrived in Canada, then later traveled south to settle in the States.

See the full announcement here.

Access the Canadian passenger list collection here.

Canada Day, formerly Dominion Day, is July 1. It celebrates the anniversary of the British North America Act of 1867, which united Canada as a country of four provinces.


Canadian roots | immigration records
Wednesday, July 01, 2009 8:43:55 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Search Four Canadian Census Indexes Free Online
Posted by Diane

FamilySearch has added indexes to the 1851, 1861, and 1871 Canada Census to its record search site (click North America on the map, then scroll down to the list of Canadian records).

The 1881 census already was online, and plans are in place to add the 1891 census.

All are the products of a three-way partnership: Ancestry.ca provided indexes to the 1851 and 1891 censuses, and FamilySearch created indexes for the 1861, 1871, and 1881 censuses. (Both sites offer these indexes.) The originals are housed at Library and Archives Canada.

Information in these census might include your ancestor's name, age, birthplace, religion, occupation, residence and ethnicity. Some information on the records is in French.

Note that FamilySearch has posted only the indexes, not the record images. It will eventually release record images to “qualified FamilySearch members.” (I believe this means volunteer indexers who’ve indexed a certain number of records.)

If you find ancestors in the free FamilySearch index for the 1851 census, you can use the location information to find those folks in the unindexed 1851 census images at the Canadian Genealogy Centre Web site. (The Canadian Genealogy Centre also has 1901, 1906 and 1911 census images, but you must know about where your ancestor lived to use them.)

The Family History Library also has the records on microfilm (run a Keyword search of the online catalog on Canada census). You can rent the film through your local Family History Center.

The digitized records also are available on the subscription sites Ancestry.ca and Ancestry.com (which also have the 1901, 1906, 1911 and 1916 censuses).


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | census records | FamilySearch | Free Databases
Wednesday, June 10, 2009 12:30:53 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, May 22, 2009
Genealogy News Corral May 18-22
Posted by Diane

Here are some quick genealogy news updates for the week. We hope you have a wonderful Memorial Day weekend, and get an opportunity to reflect on your ancestors’ sacrifice for their country.
  • British subscription and pay-per-view site Familyrelatives.com added more than 200,000 Canadian civil service records from 1872 to 1918. The records reveal the civil servant's name, position, department, length of service, salary and date of appointment. The earliest ones also provide civil servants' national origins and religion.
  • FamilySearch has added a total of 3.5 million-plus new records to 13 collections on the free FamilySearch Record Search pilot. The additions come from Brazil, the Czech Republic and Italy; and the US states of Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina and South Carolina.
  • The State Library of North Carolina and the North Carolina State Archives have posted a free collection of North Carolina family records including nearly 220 family Bible records and the six-volume Marriage and Death Notices from Raleigh Register and North Carolina State Gazette: 1799-1893.

Canadian roots | Free Databases | Genealogy Industry | Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives
Friday, May 22, 2009 4:38:34 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, May 08, 2009
Genealogy News Corral, May 4-8
Posted by Diane

Here are the news bits that came across our desks this week
  • Subscription genealogy site Ancestry.com launched a collection of German phone directories dating from 1915 to 1981. The books, which are, of course, in German, list names and addresses of more than 35 million people who lived in Germany’s major cities, as well as many businesses. 
  • British subscription and pay-per-view site FindMyPast.com added merchant seaman crew indexes with 270,000 names of seafarers between 1860 and 1913. British ships created these lists every six months, including everyone from captains to able seamen, from engine room staff to stewardesses.
  • The 1916 census of Canada is now available free at Family History Centers through their on-site Ancestry.com service. (Meaning this census isn’t on the FamilySearch pilot site—you must go to a Family History Center to search it.)
  • A late addition: The New England Historic Genealogical Society is adding digitized back issues of the journal The American Genealogist, to its subscription databases at NewEnglandAncestors.org. Vols. 1 through 8 (published as Families of Ancient New Haven) and Volumes 9–13 (dated from 1933 through 1937), are available now in separate databases. Additional volumes will be added. NEHGS memberships start at $75.

Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives | UK and Irish roots
Friday, May 08, 2009 2:02:07 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Wednesday, April 22, 2009
Ancestry.ca Adds Border Crossings into Canada
Posted by Diane

Those who used the May 2009 Family Tree Magazine article on immigrants to Canada will be pleased to learn that Ancestry.ca, sister site to Ancestry.com, has added border-crossing records from the United States to Canada between 1908 and 1935. (Thanks to Dick Eastman for the tip.)

The database may hold the key for "missing" immigrant ancestors. Between 1901 and 1914, more than 750,000 people entered Canada over the US border. Many were European immigrants who originally settled in the American West.

Americans also routinely crossed the border to visit friends and family.

But this database isn’t available with the $155.40 US-focused Ancestry.com subscription, reports Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings. You need an Ancestry.ca or a World Deluxe subscription to access it.

Note Canadian citizens returning home weren’t recorded, nor were those who had a Canadian parent. And Lisa A. Alzo, who wrote our May 2009 article, says those who crossed where ports either didn’t exist or were closed wouldn’t be listed.


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | immigration records
Wednesday, April 22, 2009 2:59:15 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, February 17, 2009
Chinese Canadians Profiled on Genealogy Wiki
Posted by Diane

Canada’s Vancouver Public Library (which started the Chinese-Canadian Genealogy Web site) and Library and Archives Canada have created a genealogy wiki centered around the country’s Chinese Immigration List.

The list bears the names of Canadian-born Chinese who registered with the government as required by the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923. Designed to curtail Chinese immigration to Canada, the act joined a procession of laws levying head taxes on Chinese immigrants. The regulations were finally lifted in 1947.

The wiki contains transcribed information on 461 people recorded on the list, covering the years from Won Alexander Cumyow’s birth in 1861 to Lee Kang Gee’s birth in 1900 (both were born in British Columbia, where most of Canada's Chinese residents lived).

Researchers with more details on any of the 461 individuals can help build their profiles—see the Participate page to get started.

You can search 98,361 names from Canada's General Registers of Chinese Immigration at the online Canadian Genealogy Center.

See the May 2009 Family Tree Magazine (now mailing to subscribers; on sale March 10) for more help researching immigrants to Canada from all over the world.


Asian roots | Canadian roots | Free Databases | immigration records
Tuesday, February 17, 2009 2:27:10 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Tuesday, November 11, 2008
Canadian Censuses To Be Digitized and Indexed
Posted by Diane

The subscription site Ancestry.ca (a Canadian records-focused sister site to Ancestry.com) and FamilySearch are partnering to digitize and index Ancestry.ca’s Canadian census records.

They’ll be available to Ancestry.ca subscribers in 2009, and the indexes will be free to the public on the FamilySearch Web site. The images will be free at FamilySearch Family History Centers.

Canadian national censuses were taken every 10 years starting in 1871; earlier censuses cover various areas of Canada. Under the agreement, FamilySearch will provide Ancestry.ca with images and indexes for 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1916 censuses. Ancestry.ca will provide FamilySearch with indexes for the 1891 and 1901 censuses.

This partnership should ease Canadian roots research a bit. Only the 1901, 1906 and 1911 censuses, as well as part of an 1851 census, are indexed by name. To find your ancestor in other censuses, you need to know his or her district and subdistrict—which could change between censuses.

The Web site Automated Genealogy is coordinating a volunteer indexing project for the 1901, 1906 and 1911 censuses; search the growing database free. If you find an ancestor’s name and district information, look for him listed in the free census images on the Library and Archives Canada Web site.

Library and Archives Canada recently announced a digitization partnership with Ancestry.ca. No specifics were available about which records are up for indexing.


Ancestry.com | Canadian roots | FamilySearch
Tuesday, November 11, 2008 10:42:46 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 06, 2008
Remembering Canadian Veterans, Re-Watching The War
Posted by Diane

We’re coming up on Veterans Day (in the United States) and Remembrance Day (in Canada), and our contributing editor Rick Crume told me about a neat remembrance of the 68,000 Canadians killed in World War I.

Nights through Nov. 11, those names will be projected onto the National War Memorial in Ottawa and buildings elsewhere Canada, and onto the side of Canada House in London's Trafalgar Square.

At the 1918 Vigil site, you can search for names of Canadians killed in the Great War to learn the person’s service number, rank, regiment, death date and the when the name will be displayed.

Also marking Veterans Day, many PBS stations are re-airing Ken Burns’ WWII documentary The War. It had me riveted to the sofa last year when it first aired.

Click here to search for broadcasts on your PBS station. You can get more veterans’ stories on the Veterans History Project's special Web site Experiencing War. (I got a chance to talk with Ken Burns recently, and I’ll share some of the conversation in a later post.)

For more on military records, see the Genealogy Insider military records category and the FamilyTreeMagazine.com online toolkit.

Canadian roots | Military records | Social History
Thursday, November 06, 2008 8:18:09 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, October 17, 2008
101 Best Web Sites: Canadian Census and Jewish Resources
Posted by Diane

Here's a look at two of our 101 Best Web Sites picks for 2008:
  • Automated Genealogy: Those with Canadian roots will appreciate this free, volunteer site with transcriptions and indexes of Canadian censuses.
Transcribed and in various stages of proofreading are the 1901, 1906 (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) and 1911 enumerations. The 1851-1852 census is underway, with an ambitious effort to link to other online records about each individual.
  • Avotaynu: Use this site’s Consolidated Jewish Surname Index to run a Soundex search of information about 699,084 surnames, mostly Jewish, in 42 databases totaling more than 7.3 million records. You also can subscribe to Avotaynu’s free e-mail newsletter on Jewish genealogy.
See the rest of the 101 best at FamilyTreeMagazine.com.


Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites | Jewish roots
Friday, October 17, 2008 1:12:21 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Monday, July 30, 2007
Search Lower Canada Land Petitions Free Online
Posted by Diane

A new Library and Archives Canada land petition database can help you find ancestors who lived in Lower Canada (where present-day Quebec is) between 1764 and 1841.

When New France became a British colony in 1763, the land-distribution system changed. New lands were now granted as part of townships instead of as seigneuries (the term for land the Crown granted to landlords, who in turn leased it to settlers).

With the change, many settlers submitted land petitions to the governor. The Lower Canada Land Petitions database indexes their petitions for grants or leases of land, as well as other administrative records. The site contains more than 95,000 references to individuals.

Search it by surname and given name. Try spelling variations and surname-only searches, since there’s no Soundex searching.

Some records are linked to digitized images, but in most cases, matches show a year, volume and page number of the original record, and a microfilm number. Use the information to request microfilm copies from the Bibliothèque et Archives Nationales du Québec (Quebec national archives).

You can access the Canadian national archives' Lower Canada Land Petitions and other databases from the Canadian Genealogy Centre Web site.


Canadian roots | Genealogy Web Sites | Research Tips
Monday, July 30, 2007 8:34:59 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]