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# Monday, January 07, 2013
New Guides Added to "A Genealogist's Guide to Names" Series
Posted by Beth

Four additional PDF downloadable reference guides have been added to the newly released series, "A Genealogist's Guide to Names." Each guide features first names from a specific region or country; naming patterns and traditions; spellings; pronunciations; and meanings that can help your search for ancestors from a given locale.

A Genealogist's Guide to Gaelic Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Irish Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Native American Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Russian Names
 


American Indian roots | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales | UK and Irish roots
Monday, January 07, 2013 9:12:43 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [10]
# Wednesday, January 02, 2013
What's in a Name?
Posted by Beth

Bonne année, Gutes Neues Jahr, Xin nian yu kuai, Feliz Año Nuevo and Kali hronia … Whether you say it in French, German, Mandarin, Spanish or Greek, they all translate to "Happy New Year!" Hope yours is off to a great start!

Speaking of languages, genealogists understand and appreciate the value of names and all the family history information that they can provide. Naming patterns and traditions; spellings; pronunciations; and meanings can impact your search for ancestors from a given locale.

To provide added insight to your ancestral search, we've created 15 PDF downloadable reference guides featuring first names from around the world. Each comprehensive guide is presented in dictionary-style format, making it easy to search for names, spellings and their meanings. For example, A Genealogist's Guide to British Names reveals that the name Harry means "ruler of an estate." Rather prophetic for Prince Harry!

Get more information from your genealogical research this year with a better understanding of your ancestral names!

A Genealogist's Guide to Ethnic Given Names
A Genealogist's Guide to African Names
A Genealogist's Guide to British Names
A Genealogist's Guide  to Chinese Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Eastern European Names
A Genealogist's Guide  to French Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Gaelic Names
A Genealogist's Guide to German Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Greek Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Hawaiian Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Indian Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Irish Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Italian Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Japanese Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Jewish Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Native American Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Russian Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Scandinavian Names
A Genealogist's Guide to Spanish Names


African-American roots | American Indian roots | Asian roots | Celebrating your heritage | French Canadian roots | German roots | Hispanic Roots | Italian roots | Jewish roots | ShopFamilyTree.com Sales | UK and Irish roots
Wednesday, January 02, 2013 12:04:21 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Monday, November 14, 2011
Researching American Indian Genealogy
Posted by Diane

Do you have American Indian ancestry? Many genealogists believe they do and want to find out for sure. Others know they do but don't know how to research those ancestors.

Now's a good time to look for resources: November is National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.

In 1915, Rev. Sherman Coolidge, an Arapaho and president of the American Indian Association, declared the second Saturday of May as American Indian Day and appealed for recognition of American Indians as citizens (Indians were recognized as citizens in 1924).

Later that year, on Dec. 14, Red Fox James, a member of the Blackfeet tribe, arrived at the White House with 24 state government endorsements for a national day to honor American Indians. (Here's a photo from the Library of Congress.) He'd gathered them riding on horseback from state to state.

The first National American Indian Heritage Month was in 1990. (More on national observances here.)

Here are some free FamilyTreeMagazine.com articles to help you trace American Indian roots:

ShopFamilyTree.com resources include:

Some of our favorite websites for American Indian research are:

You'll also find indexes to the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory, March 4, 1907 (known as the Dawes Roll) and Applications Submitted for the Eastern Cherokee Roll of 1909 (the Guion-Miller Roll).


American Indian roots | Celebrating your heritage
Monday, November 14, 2011 3:54:31 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Friday, May 20, 2011
Genealogy News Corral, May 16-20
Posted by Diane

  • A new website called Unknown No Longer: A Database of Virginia Slave Names will launch in September. The site will contain free, searchable information about enslaved Virginians named in manuscripts at the Virginia Historical Society. Read more about the project here
  • FindMyPast.co.uk has completed its two-year project to make the English and Welsh birth, marriage and death records on its site easier to use. This final installment of the project makes more than 85 million death records searchable at once, with as little as a surname. The site’s death records include England & Wales deaths, 1837-2006; British nationals who died overseas, 1818-2005; British nationals armed forces deaths, 1796-2005; and British nationals who died at sea, 1854-1890.

African-American roots | American Indian roots | Celebrity Roots | UK and Irish roots
Friday, May 20, 2011 4:05:58 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]
# Monday, January 31, 2011
Genealogy News Corral
Posted by jamie

Planning to attend the New England Regional Genealogical Conference (NERGC) April 6-10 in Springfield, Mass.? Register soon: The deadline for early bird savings is Feb. 15—after that, the full-conference fee goes from $110 to $135. Learn more on the NERGC website.

Here’s another money-saving tip for you: If you’ve been thinking about joining subscription historical records site Footnote, we got an e-mail about a $49.95 membership sale going on through Jan. 31 (the normal annual membership costs $79.95). Click here to see the offer.

Starting Feb. 12, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis is hosting an exhibition called Red/Black: Related Through History about the interwoven history of African-Americans and American Indians. It gathers personal narratives, paintings, baskets, pottery, photographs and other rare items from across the country to tell the story of the two groups’ shared experiences. (You can read more about “Black Indians” here.)

The National Archives has launched a free mobile app called Today’s Document. It helps you learn what happened on a specific date, search for a document by keyword, or browse historical highlights from the archives’ holdings. You can view photos and documents, and read background information on the selection.  Learn more from this video, and download the app from the Android marketplace or the Apple iTunes Store.


African-American roots | American Indian roots | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Web Sites | Libraries and Archives
Monday, January 31, 2011 9:39:00 AM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Friday, July 30, 2010
Genealogy News Corral: July 26-30
Posted by Diane

Family Tree Magazine’s own Photo Detective, Maureen A. Taylor, will be providing free 10-minute photo consultations in the FamilySearch booth at the FGS conference, Aug. 19-21 in Knoxville, Tenn. You may bring one photo and must reserve a consultation online (looks like Aug. 19 is almost sold out).

Last year, the governor of Michigan announced a restructuring that abolished the state Department of History, Arts and Libraries, which encompassed the Library of Michigan and its genealogy collection. Though the fate of the collection is still unknown, a Library Journal update reports the genealogy collection is still located at the library, which is operating with reduced finding and staff. See the full update here.

Synium Software released Mac Family Tree 6 this week with features including a new tree editor, new reports and charts and integration with FamilySearch databases. The software requires requires Mac OS X 10.5 or 10.6 and runs on both Intel- and PowerPC-based Macs.

A new Chickasaw Cultural Center opened in Sulphur, Okla., with exhibits including a Traditional Village, Spirit Forest and Removal Experience, as well as a Research Center with genealogical, archeological and photo collections. The Chickasaw, one of the Five Civilized Tribes, were forcibly removed to Indian Territory from their homes in Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee in the 1830s.


American Indian roots | Genealogy Events | Genealogy Software | Libraries and Archives
Friday, July 30, 2010 9:33:45 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, November 19, 2009
Footnote Releases American Indian Collection
Posted by Diane

Historical records subscription site Footnote released a new records collection focusing on American Indians. It includes:
  • Ratified Indian Treaties dating back to 1722

  • Indian Census Rolls featuring information including age, place of residence and degree of Indian blood

  • The Guion Miller Roll, an important source for Cherokee ancestors

  • Dawes Packets, containing original applications for tribal enrollments, as well as other documents relating to the Five Civilized Tribes

As with Footnote’s other records, members can search, annotate and add comments to records. Visitors also can view pages for other American Indian tribes, which feature a timeline and map, photo gallery, stories and members’ comments.

The records are available with a $79.95 annual subscription to Footnote (a free seven-day trial is available). Access the collection here.

Related resources on FamilyTreeMagazine.com:


American Indian roots | Footnote | Genealogy Web Sites
Thursday, November 19, 2009 8:01:50 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #  Comments [0]
# Thursday, June 28, 2007
Ancestry.com Adds Indian Censuses, French and Italian Sites
Posted by Allison

From 1885 to 1940, the US government required American Indian reservations to take annual censuses of their members. Those census rolls, microfilmed by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), serve as a good starting place for genealogists investigating American Indian ancestry.

“For the early years, they help bridge a difficult identity transition, listing both an individual’s Indian name and their English or Christian name,” explains professional genealogist James W. Warren, a specialist in American Indian research. Some rolls record annual births and deaths—creating a “vital-records snapshot” of the tribe. “And for many years, they list each individual’s number on the previous year’s census roll, helping researchers identify maiden names and make multigenerational connections,” says Warren.

To use the microfilm (film M595), you have to know what tribe your ancestor belonged to find him in the records. But this week, Ancestry.com added the 1885-to-1940 Indian censuses in searchable, digitized format—offering more flexibility to find ancestors if you don’t know every detail (or it wasn’t recorded as you think it would be). You can search by name, tribe, birth date, family members and other parameters. The new collection is part of Ancestry.com’s US Deluxe subscription ($179.40 per year).

Warren warns that despite the federal mandate, there are record gaps for most reservations and agencies. “But an amazing number of rolls are available,” he says. “Combined with other records generated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Indian census rolls help make reservation-affiliated American Indians the best-documented ancestors in the United States for this time period.”

If your family belonged to one of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes—Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek or Seminole—this collection won’t help you. Instead, you’ll want to use the Dawes rolls, the official roster of those tribes' then-members, created from 1898 to 1907. Both the applications and final enrollment records are available on microfilm (film M1186) and digitally through NARA’s Archival Research Database. (Try Access Genealogy for an easier-to-search index.)

For more help, read the National Archives’ helpful guide to tracing American Indians in federal records.

In other news, Ancestry.com also unveiled two new Web sites for overseas researchers. Ancestry.fr and Ancestry.it bring the genealogy conglomerate’s databases and resources to French- and Italian-speaking users. To learn more, read the announcement.


Genealogy Web Sites | American Indian roots
Thursday, June 28, 2007 1:17:30 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]