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# Monday, June 30, 2008
The Importance of Enunciation in Genealogy
Posted by Diane

Reason No. 437 why you can't always believe oral history ...

One of our coworkers just celebrated her 50th wedding anniversary. The other day, she told her husband that after this year’s family reunion in New England, she wants to go up to Prince Edward Island to see where her dad came from, and taste the nearly golf ball-sized blueberries and swim in the Gulf Stream-warmed water he always talked about.

"Prince Edward Island?" my coworker told me her husband answered. "I thought your dad was from Ireland."

True story. He confessed that throughout their half-century of marriage, he's also told people her mom was born in Scotland (it was Massachusetts).

My coworker wonders what else they don’t know about each other after 50 years together. At least they kept a sense of mystery, I say.

This is just one example of how family stories can get altered over the years—and why it's a good idea to look for records that confirm what Great-grandma or -grandpa told you.


Genealogy fun | Research Tips
Monday, June 30, 2008 3:51:42 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [1]